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Thread: Swat in Control of Taliban

  1. #1
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    Default Swat in Control of Taliban




    this news is taken from dawn newspapers -


    THERE is no percentage in talking to people who despise the values one holds dearest and are committed to inflicting death and destruction aimed at overthrowing the state of Pakistan. There is no scope here for negotiation until — and that time is still distant — the Pakistan government and military can dictate terms and talk to the Taliban from a position of strength. The deals cut in the past in sheer desperation encouraged the militants. They sent a signal that the Tehrik-i-Taliban was in the ascendancy and could call the shots as it pleased. They allowed the militants to regroup and recruit more unemployed, brainwashed young men who have been led to believe that the west (all of it, without exception) is evil, that democracy is abhorrent and Pakistani political leaders who espouse secular values and enjoy popular support are worthy of death. Gen Musharraf did us no favours by playing a double-game: keeping the threat of militancy alive while claiming to tackle it. If it weren’t for me, he was telling the neocons in Washington, Pakistan would fall to the Taliban. Nothing could be further from the truth. He was part of the problem, not the solution. Gen Musharraf was interested only in his personal survival and the fate of the country was secondary.

    Control of the army is now in abler hands that are not distracted by politics. The government and the security forces seem to be on the same page for the most part. Some gains have been made in parts of Fata and the militants there appear to be on the back foot for now. But the situation in Swat is still dire. President Zardari hit the nail on the head on Friday when he said that 'the absence of options makes the choice abundantly clear.' There can be no let-up in military operations until the obscurantists have been routed, and dictated to in a manner supported by the majority of the nation. Friday’s security meeting, chaired by the president, also expressed satisfaction with the way operations are proceeding against militants. This is an optimistic view, to say the least. There have been gains, yes, but the situation in Swat is deteriorating by the day and the Taliban now control most of the valley.

    Scores of policemen are deserting. Locals are demanding an end to a military operation that is killing more civilians than militants. The security agencies, wanting to avoid their own casualties perhaps, have been reluctant so far to put boots on the ground and take on the Taliban one-to-one. They have resorted to indiscriminate artillery shelling that results in ‘collateral damage’. These are civilians, human beings, who are dying, partly at the hands of the Pakistani state. The fight must go on but the tactics have to change.

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    Pakistan’s sharia deal to embolden Taliban




    ISLAMABAD: Pakistan has gambled that an offer to introduce Islamic law to parts of the northwest will bring peace to the troubled Swat valley, but analysts fear any lull won't last long and appeasement will embolden the Taliban.

    Western officials fear Pakistan is taking a slippery road that will only benefit al-Qaeda and the Taliban, but Pakistani authorities believe the alternative of using overwhelming force on people who are, afterall, Pakistani posed a greater danger.

    The central government has said the Sharia Nizam-i-Adl, or the judicial system governed by Islamic sharia law, won't be implemented in the Malakand division of North West Frontier Province, which includes Swat, unless the guns fall silent.

    The Taliban announced a 10-day ceasefire on Sunday, while the NWFP government has said that while the military will remain deployed in Swat, there won't be any offensives, only reactive actions.

    Amnesty International estimates that between 250,000 and 500,000 people have fled their homes since late 2007, when the Taliban revolt began in Swat, an alpine region 130 km northwest of Islamabad.

    Tens of thousands have fled since August last year after an earlier peace deal broke down.

    PUBLIC BEHEADINGS

    Known as Pakistan's 'Switzerland' and once a popular tourist destination, Swat has become associated with sickening sights.

    People in the scenic valley witnessed public beheadings and summary executions by Taliban fighters administering their brand of justice.

    Bombs have targeted security forces, schools have been torched as part of a campaign against female education, and aid workers running immunisation programmes for children have been chased away by militants.

    'If peace comes through this agreement, then we wholeheartedly accept it. Afterall, we're Muslims and want Islamic system,' said Mohammad Naeem, a teacher in Mingora, the main town in Swat, whose own school was destroyed.

    Analysts, however, see the pact as little more than a tactic to buy time, as the government seeks a firmer foothold in a region over which it had lost control.

    They fear reluctance to permanently deal with reactionary forces will lead to greater problems later on. That has certainly been Swat's history in the last two decades.

    'I think this is going to be another blunder by the government,' said Khadim Hussain of the private Aryana Institute for Regional Research and Advocacy.

    'There may be a lull for awhile, but I think the government will again be trapped in more fighting. There will be more violence.'

    Monday's agreement was the third such pact signed by Pakistani authorities with Sufi Mohammad, a radical cleric who began a violent campaign for the enforcement of Islamic sharia law in the region in the 1990s.

    The first agreement provided for the appointment of a Qazi, or an Islamic jurist, to assist a judge in deciding disputes in line with Islamic injunctions, though the jurist's advice was non-binding.

    In the second pact signed in 1999, the advice of the jurist was made binding though it was never enforced.

    The latest accord, sets time limits on how long a court can take to decide a case, and establishes a designated appellate bench, meeting two key desires by the people for better justice.

    Analysts say the government may be trying to drive a wedge between hardline followers of the elderly Mohammad and even more radical militants led by his young son-in-law, Fazlullah.

    BAD PRECEDENT?

    It is a risk.

    Even if the laws being brought are far softer interpretation of sharia than the harsh Taliban version, giving ground to religious hardliners would set a 'bad precedent,' analysts said.

    It could convince the most irreconcilable militants that their violent campaign was working.

    'The present Talibanisation is not just a movement for enforcement of sharia,' Asad Munir, a former military intelligence official who served in NWFP and adjoining tribal areas in the wrote in a Pakistani daily.

    'The mullahs want power, authority and a defined role in decision-making in the social system of Pashtun society.'

    Pakistani authorities have struck a number of deals in the past with militants in the tribal areas, known sanctuaries for al-Qaeda and the Taliban.

    Generally, the violence dies down for awhile and then flares again.

    Analysts didn't foresee Fazlullah and his fighters staying quiet for long.

    'The militants are not going to give up their control...They will be getting more capability to launch more strikes, more violence if the agreement does not work,' Hussain said.

  3. #3
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    Guys this is just a news which i have published
    '
    if you want to make any comments. Pls keep them reasobnable and calm

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    nice info buddy ... lets c wat r the repercussions of this action ...

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    As a result, Islamabad's faltering military campaign there has been put on hold, and the militants have agreed to a tentative cease-fire. But many observers fear that, far from calming the conflict, the government has capitulated to the Islamist guerrillas and set a worrying precedent — one that will surely displease the U.S. officials who want the Pakistani government to take a harder line against militants.

    ...
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    Quote Originally Posted by !! K a r a n !! View Post
    as a result, islamabad's faltering military campaign there has been put on hold, and the militants have agreed to a tentative cease-fire. But many observers fear that, far from calming the conflict, the government has capitulated to the islamist guerrillas and set a worrying precedent — one that will surely displease the u.s. Officials who want the pakistani government to take a harder line against militants.
    what i am most afraid of is they are only 100 km from our border

    who knows what will hapeen

    the indian army and bsf have to be very careful now

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    {Forum Emperor} Lieutenant General !! K A R A N !!'s Avatar
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    Scarcely 100 miles from the Pakistani capital, Taliban forces loyal to jihadist preacher (and former chairlift operator) Maulana Fazlullah have brutally advanced across Swat — a region once known as the "Switzerland of Asia" — capturing more than four-fifths of the plush valley. Once a choice destination for honeymooners, Swat has over the past two years seen more than 1,500 people killed, close to 200 schools destroyed and girls' education banned, scores of beheadings and kidnappings, and more than 100,000 people driven from their homes.


    ...
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    "Tђモ MΘĐΞЯ@t◎Я"
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    According to the terms of the agreement, "all non-Shari'a laws" have been abrogated in Malakand. Security forces "will only act if fired upon by militants." And if the "writ of the state is restored," the army's 12,000 troops will be withdrawn from the valley. The agreement, which enjoys the support of President Asif Ali Zardari and the army, came about after talks with Islamist leader Sufi Mohammed — Fazlullah's father-in-law and rival.
    It is unclear what Mohammed's precise role will be, or how much leverage he has in Swat. The militant leader emerged as a force in the mid-1990s, when his loyalists, sporting black turbans, seized control of buildings and courthouses before the government of then Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto was able to tame the revolt and sign a truce. In late 2001, Mohammed led thousands of young men — including Fazlullah — to Afghanistan to fight the Western forces that had invaded in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. Upon their return, Mohammed was arrested and imprisoned. His release last year was contingent on his disavowal of militancy and an agreement to cooperate with the government.

    ...
    "I can't escape the consequences of my actions. My actions are the ground on which I stand !!!

    "Tђモ MΘĐΞЯ@t◎Я"
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    Quote Originally Posted by !! K A R A N !! View Post
    Scarcely 100 miles from the Pakistani capital, Taliban forces loyal to jihadist preacher (and former chairlift operator) Maulana Fazlullah have brutally advanced across Swat — a region once known as the "Switzerland of Asia" — capturing more than four-fifths of the plush valley. Once a choice destination for honeymooners, Swat has over the past two years seen more than 1,500 people killed, close to 200 schools destroyed and girls' education banned, scores of beheadings and kidnappings, and more than 100,000 people driven from their homes.

    Aww..

    shit man...

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    █●тнє ρяιη¢є σƒ вєηgαℓ●█ Lieutenant-Colonel Sujoy's Avatar
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    I dunno wats wrong wid Pakistan..!!

    y they are not getting tht if they bend to Taliban's demand..

    infuture..

    pakistan situetion will worsen and will b like afganistan...!!

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    For long we have been saying this. The Beitullah Masud announcement that 50,000 Taleban ladakas were ready in case India struck Pakistan was evidence enough. I think they are reaping what they sowed.....But the biggest and serious threat is the Pakistani Nukes. Pakistan I am afraid is on brink.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Singh_king View Post
    For long we have been saying this. The Beitullah Masud announcement that 50,000 Taleban ladakas were ready in case India struck Pakistan was evidence enough. I think they are reaping what they sowed.....But the biggest and serious threat is the Pakistani Nukes. Pakistan I am afraid is on brink.....
    this is the biggest problem facing india

    what if pakistan falls in the hands of taliban

    with nukes they can do anything



    more reports from dawn]





    Ayesha Jalal speculates on the challenges which face this country in future years as part of Dawn.com's launch special 'Flash Forward Pakistan: Where do we go from here?'

    Not for the first time in its short and eventful history, Pakistan stands poised to make the proverbial descent into anarchy or, if wiser counsels prevail, settle down to being the normal place so many of its citizens and well wishers abroad would like it to be.

    As on many occasions in the recent past, Pakistanis are divided and confused about how to avert disaster without compromising on what they value as emblems of their national sovereignty and Islamic identity. Whether reading newspapers or watching any of the newly set up television channels, it is impossible to avoid the sinking feeling that comes from a realization of an ever-widening gulf between ground realities and the sharply varied perceptions of them among Pakistanis. Being in denial about the threat posed by the expanding web of militancy gripping the northwest of the country is a relatively minor problem compared to the naïveté expressed in some newspaper columns and television talk shows about settling matters with the militants through political dialogue and accommodation.

    It is true that purely military solutions never work and have to be supplemented by political approaches in order to resolve intractable conflicts that have got out of hand. Yet, history is replete with evidence that there can never be lasting peace unless all sides in a dispute acknowledge some sort of constituted authority and agree to work within its legal parameters. However well-meaning, suggestions by certain ‘experts’ in Pakistan to bring the bands of armed men galvanized around the likes of Maulana Fazlullah in Swat and Beitullah Masud in South Waziristan into the political fold, are ultimately wrong headed.

    Unless they agree to lay down their arms and accept the writ of the state, it is futile to expend energy on engaging in political dialogue with such elements. Talking to random armed militias that are devoid of any legitimate authority – popular, lay or religious – defies all logic. These elements have no qualms about taking human life or destroying public and private property and have shown themselves to be enemies of not just education for girls but all forms of knowledge. The excesses of American firepower in Afghanistan, and of late in Pakistani territory, may be fuelling this tortured line of reasoning that favors concessions to murderous obscurantists. It is hardly the best way of resisting the United States and its self-seeking designs in the region.

    Of all the fallacies informing the debate on how to tackle the encircling militancy, none is more misplaced than the notion that those locked in grim battle against the Pakistani state in parts of the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), Swat and surrounding areas are ‘jihadis’. By no stretch of the imagination, far less by the principles of Islamic law and history, can the current war being waged by the militants be described as a ‘jihad’. In the Islamic tradition, an armed jihad can only be sanctioned and directed by the state upon the advice of the religious guardians.

    Today so-called ‘jihadis’ reject these restrictions by maintaining that those at the helm of modern Muslim nation states like Pakistan are complicit with infidels and, therefore, traitors who cannot be deemed legitimate rulers under Islamic law. This is a debatable argument at best since even by their own supposedly high standards of Islamic morality, these non-state ‘jihadis’ can be found seriously wanting. Those calling so loudly for the establishment of Shariah cannot violate the sanctity of life, property, knowledge, and human dignity without subverting the very basis of Islamic law. This is why Muslim jurists throughout history have always held that these vital principles of human society cannot be protected and preserved without a semblance of order and stability. Those undermining law and order in a Muslim society are perpetrating fitna, literally social and political disorder, and not jihad. This type of fitna is fundamentally at odds with jihad as a central principle of Islamic ethics.

    The call to negotiate with those who are fomenting fitna has arisen because the Pakistani state has in recent years surrendered a lot of ground to the forces of disorder. If talking to armed militants has become to some extent a matter of pragmatic necessity, such negotiations cannot be conducted by undermining the legitimacy of parties and popular representatives that won the confidence of the people in the north-west frontier regions as recently as the elections of February 2008. That reference to the people had been a substantially free and fair one and its verdict ought not to be set aside lightly. The electorate rejected the politics of religious extremism by a substantial margin. The recent assassination attempts on Awami National Party leaders and killings of elected representatives by the extremists are instances of a lethally armed minority holding to ransom the will of a democratically inclined majority. To concede to such intimidation would be to acquiesce in a virtual coup by religious extremists.

    This is not to say a fitna cannot be dealt with through a combination of firm resolve and a willingness to talk without surrendering the irreducible elements of state authority and the basic principles of democratic governance. The mainstreaming of jihad in its true sense would mean restoration of ethics and humanity in the politics and public affairs of Pakistan. Allowing those who are engaged in the current fitna that violates all principles of humanity and equity to steal the mantle of jihad would be an unholy compromise with injustice and wrong.

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    [IMG]Swat students seek migration after threats[/IMG]


    PESHAWAR: Over an application of 42 girl students of Saidu Medical College in the restive Swat valley, seeking migration to colleges in other areas, the Peshawar High Court on Tuesday summoned the vice chancellor of Khyber Medical University, Pakistan Medical and Dental Council secretary, principals of public sector medical colleges in the province and other high-ups.

    The applicants, Ms Kulsoom Khattak, and 41 others had sent an application to the Peshawar High Court Chief Justice Tariq Pervez Khan who converted it into a human rights petition.

    The petition was fixed before a two-member bench comprising Justice Dost Moammad Khan and Justice Said Maroof Khan. The bench observed that the issue was of immense importance and all the officials concerned should appear in person on Feb 18, the next date of hearing.

    The bench put on notice PMDC secretary, KMU vice-chancellor, provincial secretary of health department, principals of Saidu, Khyber, Ayub and Gomal medical colleges, secretary of Higher Education Commission and others.

    The court ordered that service should be made to those high-ups through ordinary mode as well as through fax and courier service. It was added that the entire expenses of the case would be met by the high court.

    When the bench took up for hearing the petition it asked senior lawyer Waseemuddin Khattak to assist the court on the issue. Later on, the court also summoned the section officer (litigation) of health department and counsel of KMC and asked them about a way out in the instant case.

    Finally the bench decided to hear high-ups of different departments and colleges in person so as to resolve the issue and provide relief to the applicants.

    The applicants have stated that due to precarious law and order situation in swat district they could not go there to attend their college. They added that the college, which was closed for winter vacation, would reopen in March.

    The applicants claimed that militants had placed a ban on female education and announced through their FM radio station that they would not be allowed to attend educational institutions.

    They stated that in present circumstances it had become next to impossible for them to attend the college.

    They requested the chief justice to order their migration to other public sector medical colleges in other areas so as to save their precious year.

  14. #14
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    i think pakistan know what he is doing

    i think it wants shelter those taliban from usa army

    but that is short term,pak must think abt its long term effect
    or pak is playing is there any game or ppl of swat vally wants taliban or shariyat rule

    its very interesting to see what our paki frnds comment abt this
    ?

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