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Thread: Comics and Sex

  1. #1
    💥💥💥💥💥💥 Lieutenant General hotspicyhot's Avatar
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    Cool Comics and Sex

    Comics and Sex




    Sex in comic books is a curious thing. There is a common stigma against it, particularly from women. Part of it is because of this perception of comic books as an adolescent MALE fantasy. Easy to see why: all the females are big-chested, curvy, long-legged, and wear revealing skintight costumes. Of course, an argument can be made that the male heroes are also Adonis-shaped and available to ogle at, but their fitness are always portrayed as strength, not beauty. With the women, it’s different. Their physique is eye-candy. Otherwise, they would look butch and muscle-clad, not like supermodels.

    The Teen Titan Starfire was created pretty much as a sex symbol, and has stayed that way since. She seems to ooze sexuality every chance she gets, and is often portrayed as the means for Nightwing’s – er – unloading. Though she's been an important and respectable part of the Titans, there's really no question what her primary function is.

    In the 90s, sex was a major selling point for mainstream comics. With Image Comics’ rise to the top of the industry, they set a not-so-good example for Marvel and DC. Following artist Rob Liefeld’s, shall we say, dynamic anatomical drawings, all of a sudden the popular thing to do was to give male heroes bigger muscles and the female heroes bigger melons. Then there's a whole 'nother thing with armors, shoulder pads, and big honkin' guns. It was a silly trend then, and it's still silly today. Take a look at the inspiring costume The Invisible Woman had during this sordid period:



    Thank god it passed.

    Because of Frank Miller’s seminal and more adult-themed portrayal of Batman in The Dark Knight Returns, superhero comics have been trying to push the violence further. There is a rising popularity of “badass” heroes. Those of you eagerly anticipating Spider-Man 3, do know that Venom is one of the results of the demand for darker stuff. It’s telling that he went from a Spidey villain to getting his own book and becoming an anti-hero of sorts. In his 90s solo title, Venom earned a license to kill and became a government-sanctioned “lethal protector,” a Jack Bauer who eats the brains of terrorists to protect innocents.

    Yet, sex stays stifled. Perhaps not repressed, but definitely shallow. The extent of sex in comics was basically the equivalent of sultry Bond girls. True, maybe superhero comics are not the right venue to discuss the more honest and mature aspects of sex. We accept that heroes have biological needs too, but there’s no need to be explicit about it. In fact, in one instance where Avengers tried, it was just… strange.

    The instance in question is an infamous sex scene between Hank Pym (Ant Man/Giant Man/Yellowjacket) and his wife Janet (The Wasp). The couple has a lot of history between them. Hank had a nervous breakdown and ruined their superhero marriage by verbally abusing and then hitting Janet; an incident that, decades later, still earns him the label of a wifebeater among fans. Janet divorced Hank and the Avengers chucked him out of the team (I suppose Captain America was not too appreciative of spousal abuse). In the fairly recent and controversial Avengers #71, the issue was supposed to show Hank and Janet rebuilding their relationship. Though she refuses to marry him again, the issue shows them on a lover’s trip to Vegas. It opens with Hank and Janet having sex, where apparently Hank uses his size-shifting ability to shrink himself and give Janet a full-body oral sex.



    I’m pretty sure I’ve seen this same scenario in a Japanese hentai somewhere…

    Anyhoo, the villain Whirlwind later shows his obsession towards Janet, by killing a prostitute dressed in the Wasp costume and then, when he has the real Wasp in his grasp, proceeds to l!ck her. This is but one of the pretty disturbing trend in modern comics to “up the ante,” as they say, in making villains more of a threat. The easiest way to show a supervillain being demented? Rape, of course. As proven effectively in DC Comics’ best-selling mini-series Identity Crisis, by thriller novelist Brad Meltzer. In a shocking flashback, the story reveals that years earlier, frequent Teen Titans villain Dr. Light snuck into the Justice League headquarters and raped Elongated Man’s wife Sue Dibny. The fact that the rape scene was showed on page upset quite a lot of fans.

    Just as controversial is an issue where Nightwing, in a state of daze, gets man-raped by the vigilante Tarantula. To point out another example, longtime Daredevil villain The Purple Man was risen to new dastardly heights in Brian Michael Bendis' mature readers book Alias, where he is shown using his mind control powers to get college girls to have sex with him and playing submissive roleplay games with the book's heroinne Jessica Jones. What exactly is up here?


    Last edited by hotspicyhot; 14-04-2009 at 01:57 PM.

  2. #2
    💥💥💥💥💥💥 Lieutenant General hotspicyhot's Avatar
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    Similarly, Amazing Spider-Man writer J. Michael Straczynski got a face-full of feces from angry fans when he besmirched the legacy of Spidey’s ex Gwen Stacy. In the now legendary story “The Night Gwen Stacy Died”, Norman Osborn (Green Goblin) abducts Gwen and drops her off the Brooklyn Bridge, just to mess with Spiderman (the scene was referenced in the first Spider-Man movie, but with Mary-Jane and had a happy ending). Spidey shoots his web trying to save Gwen, but the whiplash from his web-line ends up snapping her neck. Straczynski controversially changed this, by offering a flashback where the wholesome goody-goody Gwen Stacy felt the call of the wild and seduced Norman Osborn of all people to sleep with her. This took away the weight of her death. She was supposed to be pure, innocent, and her death was there to remind readers that Peter Parker’s decision to put on that red-and-blue costume has some serious side-effects. Guilt has always been a part of Spidey’s lore. Now with this new revelation, Gwen was to fault for her own death.

    Again, just like issues of 9/11 we talked about in our previous Captain America panel, this is the face of comics today. The Superman villain Toyman went from a genius toymaker to a psychotic pedophile who hears the voices of “Mother” in his head telling him to abduct children. In today’s world, it’s not enough for a villain to have death gadgets and world conquest plans. Al Qaeda has them beat. No, villains have to be vile and repulsive to elicit a stronger emotion from readers. In theory, at least. I personally have no problem with old-fashioned villains and their gimmicks. Not everything has to be grim and oh-so-dementedly-violent.

    So what, then? The graphic portrayal of sex and the sinister part of it are alive and well in comics. However, the issues surrounding sex are nowhere to be seen. They’re either pornographic, or juvenile. We’re lucky, then, that comics don’t exist in the DC/Marvel dualism only. There are always independent comics to go against the grain and stir the pot. Still, not a lot of them deal with sexuality directly. Most of them, when they deal with sex, are alluding to relationship problems and coming-of-age maturity stories. One of my favorite graphic novels of all time, Craig Thompson’s Blankets, touches beautifully on the guilt of sex in a Christian-infused society in Middle America. However, the bulk of the story is the building relationship and love, not sex. Same thing with Jeffrey Brown’s charmingly crude series of autobiographical work, ranging from Clumsy to Unlikely to Be A Man… They show honest renditions of Brown’s own sexual encounters, but they are still part of his relationship dramas.

    One exception is Charles Burns’ Black Hole, an excellent surrealistic horror comic that deals with teenagers in the 1970s as they maneuver through a life of emptiness, social ladder, drugs and sex. The kids in Black Hole are afraid and abusive towards the freaks, a band of teenagers with strange physical deformities. If you sleep with one, you’ll catch their disease and mutate into another freak. It’s a creepy and very trippy comic that discusses young people’s ignorance towards STDs and outcasts, and how the choices you make regarding your sexual growth in your green years affect your future paths. This fantastic story is currently being developed into a horror film, with Alexander Aja (Haute Tension, Hills Have Eyes) directing and the script being written by fantasy master Neil Gaiman and writer/director Roger Avary (Pulp Fiction).


    We’ll end it here for now. But next time, we’ll be back with more sex in comics – and this time, we’ll take a look at the ones that really spread it all out, pun fully intended.
    Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you react to it.

  3. #3
    █●тнє ρяιη¢є σƒ вєηgαℓ●█ Lieutenant-Colonel Sujoy's Avatar
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    Sex must...

  4. #4
    सत्यमेव जयते Field Marshal Baadsah's Avatar
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    Wonderful thread!

    Rep error but due.
    You will never reach your destination if you stop and throw stones every dog that barks.
    -Winston Churchill



  5. #5
    Machinehead Lieutenant General ignoramusenator's Avatar
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    Sexy comics


    Make My Day

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    SB Addict shahbaz_major@hotmail.com's Avatar
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    Thanx For Sharing....

  7. #7
    SB King Field Marshal
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    thanx buddy


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