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Thread: Diwali "The Festival Of Lights"...........All about Diwali.

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    Default Diwali "The Festival Of Lights"...........All about Diwali.

    Diwali falls, the Indian festival of lights, falls on the day of 'Amavasyaa', when the moon does not rise and there is darkness all around. Light, being symbol of hope and positive energy, indicates the victory of good over evil. By spreading light in every corner of our premises, we try to destroy the reign of darkness, on the night of Diwali. People decorate their premises with diyas, electric bulbs and other decorative electric lighting fixtures, to make their surroundings filled with colorful light and to make it bright and beautiful. Go through the following lines to learn more about Diwali and its significance.

    What Is Diwali

    Deepavali - the very name of this festival reveals its meaning. The festival is all about the lighting diyas. Later the term 'Deepawali' became 'Diwali'. Deepawali or Diwali is also known as 'the festival of lights', because on this day, people illuminate their home and premises with diyas and colorful lights. Celebrated usually in the month of October or November, Diwali bears significance in the Hindu culture as well as among Buddhists, Sikhs and Jains. The legends connected to the festival are different for different religions.



    Wo Acha Hay Tou Behtar, Bura Hay Tou Bhi Qabool
    Mizaaj-E-Ishq Mein Aib-O-Hunar Dekhe Nahi Jatay...!!!


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    Importance of Diwali


    Diwali is the Indian festival that brings a series of festivals with it. One after another, we get a chance to celebrate five ceremonious occasions. The people of all age groups and classes with equal zeal and enthusiasm celebrate Diwali throughout India. They put on new apparels and participate in the various activities that are related to Diwali celebrations. It is a festival of celebrations such as lightings, crackers, cleanliness, colorful rangoli making, social gatherings to exchange greetings and sharing sweets with your loved ones. Diwali is a festival filled with spiritualism and religious activities, such as worship of Goddess Lakshmi, worship of Lord Ganesha, worship of Ma Kali, worship of Lord Chitragupta and worship of Govardhan Parvat.

    The celebration of the five-day long festival, Diwali, begins on Aswayuja Bahula Chaturdashi and concludes on Kartika Shudha Vijaya. The first day of this festival begins with 'Dhan Trayodashi' or 'Dhanteras'. After the Dhanvantari Trayodashi the second day of Diwali is 'Narak Chaturdashi', which is popular as 'Chhoti Diwali'. The third day of Diwali, which is also called 'Badi Diwali' is the main day of celebrations of the festival of Diwali. People perform Lakshmi Pujan (worship of divine Goddess Lakshmi) on this day and offer prayers to her to bless them with wealth and prosperity. The fourth day of Diwali is devoted to Govardhan Pooja (worship of Lord Govardhan Parvat). The fifth day of the Diwali is Bhai Dooj, the time to honor the brother-sister relationship.


    Wo Acha Hay Tou Behtar, Bura Hay Tou Bhi Qabool
    Mizaaj-E-Ishq Mein Aib-O-Hunar Dekhe Nahi Jatay...!!!


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    History of Diwali

    Five Days of Diwali Celebrations

    The first day of this festival begins with 'Dhan Trayodashi' or 'Dhanteras'. After the Dhanvantari Trayodashi, the second day of Diwali is called 'Narak Chaturdashi', which is popular as 'Chhoti Diwali'. The third day of Diwali, which is also called 'Badi Diwali' is the main day of celebrations of the festival of diwali. The fourth day of the festival is devoted to Govardhan Pooja (worship of Lord Govardhan Parvat). The fifth day of the festival is Bhai Dooj, the time to honor the brother-sister relationship.

    Dhanteras History

    The first day of Diwali celebration is marked by Dhanteras. According to the legends, during the churning of ocean by the Gods and the demons, Dhanvantari - the physician of the Gods came out of the ocean on the day of Dhanteras, with a pot of amrita that was meant for the welfare of the humankind. This day also marks the arrival of Goddess Lakshmi, which is celebrated by drawing small footprints of the deity, with rice flour and vermilion powder.

    Narak Chaturdashi (Choti Diwali) History

    One famous story behind the celebrations of Diwali is about the demon king Narakasur, who was ruler of Pragjyotishpur, a province to the South of Nepal. During a war, he defeated Lord Indra and snatched away the magnificent earrings of Mother Goddess Aditi, who was not only the ruler of Suraloka, but also a relative of Lord Krishna's wife - Satyabhama. Narakasur also imprisoned sixteen thousand daughters of Gods and saints in his harem. A day before Diwali, Lord Krishna killed Narakasur, released the jailed daughters and restored the precious earrings of Mother Goddess Aditi.

    Diwali And Shri Ram of Ayodhyaa

    The most famous legend behind the celebrations of Diwali is about the prince of Ayodhya Nagri - Lord Shri Ram. According to the legend, the king of Lanka, Ravan, kidnapped Lord Ram's wife (Sita) from the jungle, where they were staying as per the instructions of King Dashratha, father of Lord Ram. Then Ram attacked Lanka, killed Ravan and released Sita from the custody. He returned to Ayodhya with his wife Sita and younger brother Lakshamana after fourteen years.

    Therefore, the people of Ayodhyaa decorated their homes as well as Ayodhyaa, by lighting tiny diyas, in order to welcome their beloved prince Shri Ram and Devi Sita. It was the day of 'Kartik Amavasyaa' when they also celebrated the victory of Shri Ram over the King of Lanka, Ravan. Ram is considered the symbol of good and the positive things and Ravan represents the evils. Therefore, Diwali is considered the festival, which establishes the victory of good over the evil. On the night of Diwali, people light diyas, which is again an icon of positive energy to conquer darkness, the is symbol of negative energy.

    Govardhan Puja History

    'Govardhan' is a small hillock situated at 'Braj', near Mathura. The legends in 'Vishnu Puraan' have it that the people of Gokul used to worship and offer prayers to Lord Indra for the rains, because they believed that it were He, who was responsible for rainfall for their welfare. However, Lord Krishna told them that it was Mount Govardhan (Govardhan Paevat) and not Lord Indra, who caused rains. Therefore, they should worship the former and not the latter.

    People did the same, which made Lord Indra so furious that the people of Gokul had to face heavy rainfall because of his anger. Lord Krishna came forward to ensure their security and after performing worship and offering prayers to Mount Govardhan, he lifted it as an umbrella, on the little finger of his right hand, so that everyone could take shelter under it. After this event, Lord Krishna was also known as Giridhari or Govardhandhari.

    Bhai Dooj History

    According to the legends, Lord Yamraj, the God of Death, visited his sister Yamuna on the 'Shukla Paksha Dwitiya' day in the Hindi month of 'Kartik'. When Yamraj reached Yamuna's home, she welcomed him by performing his aarti, applying 'Tilak' on his forehead and by putting a garland around his neck. Yamuna also cooked varieties of dishes, prepared many sweets for her brother and offered all those to Him.

    Lord Yamraj ate all those delicious dishes and when he was finished, he showered blessings on Yamuna and gave her a boon that if a brother visits his sister on this day, he would be blessed with health and wealth. This is why this day of Bhayya Duj is also known by the name of 'Yam-Dwitiya'. Thus, it has become a tradition that on the day of Bhai-Dooj for the brothers to visit their sisters' home and offer them gifts. Sisters also make various dishes for their brothers and give gifts to them

    .

    History Of Sikh Community's Diwali

    In the Sikh community, Diwali celebrations have special importance as for them it, is popular as the day when their sixth Guru, Guru Har Govind ji came back from the captivity of the fort of Gwalior city. The people illuminated lamps in the way to Shri Harmandhir Sahib, which is known by the name of 'the Golden Temple', to honor and welcome their beloved Guru.

    History of Jain Community's Diwali

    For the Jain community, the festival of Diwali has special significance. It is the day when the famous Jain prophet Bhagvaan Mahaveer, the founder of Jainism, attained 'Nirvana'. Therefore, the people of Jain community celebrate the festival of Diwali in remembrance of Lord Mahavira.
    Wo Acha Hay Tou Behtar, Bura Hay Tou Bhi Qabool
    Mizaaj-E-Ishq Mein Aib-O-Hunar Dekhe Nahi Jatay...!!!


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    How can we celebrate Diwali without harming the environment?


    Think Diwali, and the first thing that comes to your mind are firecrackers. There’s been growing alarm at the long term ill effects of the fireworks on the environment, apart from the noise pollution and the streets littered with paper and the contaminated air that we breathe. What steps can we take to ensure that this Diwali and subsequent Diwalis are eco-friendly and safe?


    WE CAN HAVE A CRACKERS SHOW FOR 2 HOURS IN A COMMON PLACE WHERE PEOPLE CAN SEE AND ENJOY THE CRACKERS, INSTEAD OF EACH DOING AT THEIR HOME IN A SMALL WAY AND MAKING THE WHOLE CITY DUSTY WITH PAPER
    IF IN A COMMON PLACE



    (1)THE SOUND WILL BE ONLY FOR A PARTICULAR TIME

    (2) THE PAPER DUST WILL BE ONLY IN ONE PLACE

    (3) THE COST OF DIVALI CELEBRATIONS CAN BE REDUCED

    (4) NO NEIGHBOURS ENVY

    (5) ONLY A LITTLE OF AIR AND SOUND POLLUTION

    (6) CAN BE HAD IN A PLACE FAR FROM HOSPITALS

    (7) SAFE MEASURES CAN BE ENSURED IN THAT PLACE

    (8) MONITERING OF THE SAFETY OF THE PEOPLE IS EASY

    (9) ENJOYMENT CAN BE SHARED BY ALL AT THE SAME PLACE

    (10) A GET-TOGETHER IS EASY
    Wo Acha Hay Tou Behtar, Bura Hay Tou Bhi Qabool
    Mizaaj-E-Ishq Mein Aib-O-Hunar Dekhe Nahi Jatay...!!!


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    1. Dress for Diwali

      Step 1

      Perform a ritual bath on the evening before Diwali begins and before you put on any new clothing. This should be followed by the anointing of oils and perfumes, and a puja, which is a specific prayer and meditation period observed by Hindus.

      Step 2

      Use the first day of the Diwali celebration, known as Dhan teras, to shop for all of your clothing. Spending all of Dhan teras shopping for supplies, such as fireworks, diyas (clay pots filled with oil that are lit like lamps), sweets and clothing is part of the Diwali tradition.




      Step 3

      Make sure that all of the clothing you wear on Diwali is new, which is also part of the tradition. This is to give thanks to Lakshmi Mata, the goddess of light and prosperity, for providing you with good fortune.





      Step 4

      Dress in clothes that are brightly colored and might be considered extravagant under ordinary circumstances. Diwali is a time to "dress for excess," and you should choose apparel that reflects the themes of light and illumination. Children should be dressed in colorful robes or dresses, as well



      Step 5

      Add plenty of jewelry to your Diwali outfit. While gold and silver are preferable, you may include any costume jewelry that is brightly colored and contributes to the joy of the Festival of Lights.


      Step 6

      Decorate your hands, if you are a female, with henna paints or temporary henna tattoos. Traditions state that such body art is to be treated as a blessing that will light up the soul, which is consistent with the celebration of Diwali.
    Wo Acha Hay Tou Behtar, Bura Hay Tou Bhi Qabool
    Mizaaj-E-Ishq Mein Aib-O-Hunar Dekhe Nahi Jatay...!!!


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    Nice Bhai Nice...
    Thanks

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    Have a Safe Diwali


    Diwali is one of the most widely celebrated festivals in India. It symbolises the victory of good over evil, and new beginnings. Diwali is celebrated over a period of five days namely - Dhanteras, Narakachaturdashi, Diwali, Padhwa and Bhai Dhooj.

    Links with Nature

    Did you know that Diwali actually falls on the darkest night of the year? The new moon night of the month of Ashwin ( of the Hindu calender) which may arrive either in October or November ( of the Gregorian calender) is considered to be the darkest night of the year by the Hindus. The tradition of lighting lamps on this night may have come from the need for light on this intensely dark night.

    Diwali also celebrates the abundance of the autumn harvest. The autumn harvest (kharif) of rice for example, accounts for 53 percent of total production. It is sown between March and August and harvested between June and December.


    In Nepal, the first two days of Diwali are celebrated by worshipping animals. On the first day, cows are given offerings, in appreciation of the food they have given and agricultural work they have performed. On the second day, dogs and all living animals are revered and offered special food.





    Celebrate an ecosensitive Diwali this year!

    The first step towards celebrating an ecosensitive Diwali is to become aware of the impacts the festival of Diwali has on Nature. Here are three such imapcts:

    1. Firecrackers and Air Pollution

    Firecrackers are the fun of Diwali! These aesthetic forms of light seem so appropriate when celebrating the 'Festival of Lights'! But in our increasingly polluted cities, the temporary joy of watching the firecrackers is soon replaced by the intense air pollution caused by these. The toxic substances used in the firecrackers release toxic gases that are harmful to the health of all living beings. The high level of noise generated by the crackers also cause immense sufferring to birds and animals and are dreaded by the sick and the ailing.

    Besides few of us realise that the firecrackers are made by very young children using child labour. Since the substances being handled are extremely toxic many of these children get sick and die in their early teenage years.

    Say No to Fire crackers and ‘Yes’ to life!


    Harmful effects of chemicals used in crackers

    Copper: Irritation of respiratory tract
    Cadmuim: Anaemia and damage to kidney
    Lead: Affects the nervous system
    Magnesium: Dust and fumes cause metal fume fever
    Sodium: Reacst violently with moisture and can attack the skin.
    Zinc: Leads to vomiting
    Nitrate: Could lead to mental impairment
    Nitrite: Could lead to coma

    Let there be an explosion of joy without crackers!

    Noise Pollution due to Fire Crackers

    Crackers that make a noise of more than decibels upto a distance of metres are banned by the law.

    Noise pollution leads to hearing loss, high blood pressure, heart attack and sleeping disturbances.

    Sudden exposure to loud noise could cause temporary deafness or permanent relative deafness.

    2. Consumerism

    An indirect but equally significant impact of Diwali on nature is due to the increased consumption. Since Diwali is also a celebration of abundance and wealth - many people believe that it is a good time to buy. Often, people go out and buy new items even when they dont need them. Advertisements and hoardings scream out to people offerings sales extravaganzas, bargains, discounts encouraging us to buy and buy more!

    How does this increased consumption affect Nature?

    All man made items are made out of materials that come from Nature. Be it plastic, metal, paper or cloth – the raw materials for all of these come directly from nature. Those sources that are non renewable ( cannot be grown back) such as fossil fuels and metal ores get depleted and will one day run out. Depletion of non renewable natural resources is one of the most significant impact of consumerism. The gold earrings that you will buy from Diwali is coming from a gold mine that is not only depleting the gold resources of the earth, but in the process of mining is probably ruining several ecosystems.

    Where do all the things we throw away go finally? Solid waste created by human beings which is non biodegradable ( does not easily decompose ) has to be filled into holes dug up in the ground. These ‘landfills’ as they are called may exist for centuries without completely getting integrated into the soil. The plastic toys that you are throwing away today, may exist in a landfill several generations after yours!

    This is why to be able to conserve our natural environment it is important to
    • Reduce : the amount of things we use
    • Reuse : the things we have in different forms until we have absolutely no use for them
    • Recycle : items that are no longer functional.


    In addition we could add two more principles
    • Rethink : the choices we make when deciding to buy something and
    • Refuse : things that we do not need at all.

    Before you buy something new this Diwali apply the above five principles and only then pay at the counter!

    3. Energy Consumption

    The festival of lights puts a considerably heavy load on electrical energy sources that are already overloaded. The use of electric lights to adorn homes, business establishments, monuments and roads requires a huge amount of electricity.

    The older tradition of burning oil lamps is a possible alternative to electric lights – even though it does use oil, the duration of the lamps is shorter.

    Wo Acha Hay Tou Behtar, Bura Hay Tou Bhi Qabool
    Mizaaj-E-Ishq Mein Aib-O-Hunar Dekhe Nahi Jatay...!!!


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    Traditional Deepavali Pooja



    Diwali Pooja is performed in different families in a different way depending upon their regional and cultural customs. In villages, even the cattle are adorned and worshipped by farmers on this occasion as they regard them as their main source of their income. In south India also, cows are offered special veneration this day as they are supposed to be the incarnation of Goddess Lakshmi. However, in most of the families the Pooja is done in a simple way by installing the idols of Goddess Laxmi and Lord Ganesha on the eve of Diwali.

    The Pooja begins by the gathering of the entire family in the Pooja room and installation of the new idols of the deities in the small mandir at home. The senior most member of the family along with the priest of the family performs all the ritual. The ritual begins with the purification ceremony, each of the deities is bathed first with water, then with panchamitra (a mixture of milk, curd, ghee sugar & honey) and then with water again, this is actually a process of the purification of the idols before deities are invoked into it. After this, five pieces of ghee diyas are lit in front of the deities in order to drive away the shadows of evil spirits. The pooja thali containing all kids of prasads are then placed infront of the deities.

    All the members of the family are then asked to close their eyes and chant the mantras as recited by the priest. Even if they do not know the mantra they can simply close their eyes and remember the deities with full devotion. It is said that if you remember the God by true heart, they certainly come to your place to bless you. Once the mantras are over, all the members of the family offer auspicious items like abir (red colour), sindoor (vermillion) and haldi (turmeric), flower and sweet dishes to the deities. They also light incense sticks and diyas infront of the deities and seek their blessings. People also offer silver or gold coins, nariyal and jewelries to the deities.

    Once the offering and individual Pooja is over, people do arti and sing bhajans for welcoming the god in to their home and thanking them for being kind to their family till now. Ganesh Aarti is followed by Lakshmi Aarti. The aarti thali is then taken in each room of the home to purify the entire home. After the aarti is over, the priest of the family is presented with gifts and the process of lighting diyas in the entire home begins. After the lighting is done, people take the ‘prasad’ and burst crackers.
    Wo Acha Hay Tou Behtar, Bura Hay Tou Bhi Qabool
    Mizaaj-E-Ishq Mein Aib-O-Hunar Dekhe Nahi Jatay...!!!


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    The Lone Ranger Lieutenant General rishabhd's Avatar
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    Presents For Deepavali

    Dry Fruits Gift Basket


    Dry fruit gift basket is one of the most common and preferred gifts for Diwali. Gift packs containing an assortment of several varieties of dry fruits including nuts, cashews, chestnuts, almonds and many more are available in the market. You may choose the price range for the gift basket as well.

    Traditional Indian Outfits

    Since Diwali is a ceremonious occasion, consider sending traditional Indian outfits to your near and dear. You may either opt for readymade garments or buy the materials for salwar-kameez, suit etc.

    Sweets Pack

    A traditional Diwali gift, sweets are inevitable parts of the celebration. Consider buying a gift pack of mixed sweets for your relatives. Ensure that you satisfy their taste. In case you are presenting the gift to calorie conscious people, you may opt for the low-calorie sweets.

    Jewelry

    Buying and exchanging jewelry as gifts on Diwali is considered auspicious. You may buy A piece of jewellery made of silver, gold or diamond such as bracelets, rings, chains, pendants, cufflinks, tie-pins etc. Jewellery boxes are also good gift items.

    Time Piece

    In the present time, wrist watches are not only used to check the time, but also worn as accessory, matching the attire. Hence, wrist watch makes a perfect Diwali gift item, to bestow upon an individual. In case you are purchasing present for a family, you may buy wall clocks that are now available in various attractive shapes and sizes.

    Gadgets

    Electronic devices like television, mobile phone, DVD player, home theatre system, mp3 player are perfect gifts for the entire family. During the festive season, a number of electronic manufacturers come up with attractive offers, like 'buy one get one free' or exchange offers. Make the most of the offer, during the festive season!

    Kitchenware

    Utensils used in the kitchen, including pots and pans, mixing bowls, cutting boards, knives and spoons are included in kitchenware. You may purchase crystal glass, optical fiber, plastic or crockery, depending upon your budget.

    Showpiece

    If you are planning to buy showpiece for your relatives, then consider buying artworks. You may also go for wall hangings. A wide variety is available in the market, during the festive season.

    Wo Acha Hay Tou Behtar, Bura Hay Tou Bhi Qabool
    Mizaaj-E-Ishq Mein Aib-O-Hunar Dekhe Nahi Jatay...!!!


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    Fun Activities For Deepavali

    Playing Games


    Playing cards is a good old tradition of Diwali. It is the one of the best pastimes for the occasion. While playing cards, be sure not to keep a lot of money on stake. You may play cards without gambling as well. Rummy is a popular game of cards. Apart from card games, you can utilize the time in playing indoor games such as 'dumb charades', 'pass the parcel', 'musical chair', and outdoor games such as 'scavenger hunt', 'hide and seek' etc.

    Bursting Crackers

    It is said that Diwali is incomplete without bursting crackers. Although people are well aware of the harmful effects of the chemical, noise and pollution emitted by the crackers, they would not mind bursting them, on the occasion of Diwali. The best way to ensure that you do not do much harm to your environment is to use crackers that do not make much noise and are safe to use. Children should burst crackers only under the guidance of adults.

    Feasting

    Diwali is a festival when people feast on lavish meal. Delicious sweets are prepared by the women, to serve on sumptuous dinner and lunch. You may call upon and host a dinner or lunch. Although feasting is not mandatory for Diwali, many households take immense pleasure in hosting lunch or dinner, because they get a chance to strengthen their social ties, through the get-together.

    Cleaning And Decorating Home

    The home is scrub cleaned few days prior to the festival, in order to welcome Goddess Lakshmi - the Goddess of Wealth. People ensure that every nook and corner of their home and premises is cleaned. Apart from cleaning, they would decorate their place with flower garlands, torans, wall hangings, embellishments made of bells and mirrors etc. Making rangoli is a beautiful aspect of the festival.

    Making Crafts

    Beautiful crafts are made on the occasion of Diwali. People who have a creative mind explore their surroundings and collect items that can be used to make beautiful embellishments for their home. Making diya is a popular activity, because it gives them the opportunity to illuminate their home with a wide variety of diyas. Kids especially feel special about making decorative items on their own.

    Cooking

    It can be said that cooking is an inevitable activity for Diwali. This is largely because during the season, numerous varieties of mouth-watering sweets are prepared. Cooking is something that keeps the people, who have interest in the culinary art, busy for many days.
    Wo Acha Hay Tou Behtar, Bura Hay Tou Bhi Qabool
    Mizaaj-E-Ishq Mein Aib-O-Hunar Dekhe Nahi Jatay...!!!


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    Man that`s what i called a complete info..........TFS & happy diwali 2 U in advance added.
    I Am Free Of All Prejudice. I Hate Everyone Equally.

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    The Lone Ranger Lieutenant General rishabhd's Avatar
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    frndz if want to share smthing or want to know smthind regarding Diwali plz feel free to post it here..................like ur way of celebrating diwali, ur way of decorating ur house etc..........
    Wo Acha Hay Tou Behtar, Bura Hay Tou Bhi Qabool
    Mizaaj-E-Ishq Mein Aib-O-Hunar Dekhe Nahi Jatay...!!!


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    wow nice thread

    Happy deepavali man

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    Chhupa Rustam Lieutenant-Colonel vicky.'s Avatar
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    wow nice thread................

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    nice thread.

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