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Thread: India’s Math genius - Srinivasa Ramanujan

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    Cool India’s Math genius - Srinivasa Ramanujan

    Renowned Mathematician






    Srinivasa Ramanujan is declared as one of the most famous mathematic geniuses in India. The Central government celebrates Ramanujan’s birthday as the National Mathematics Day every year on 22nd December.

    And 2012 has been declared as the National Mathematical year.


    Srinivasa Ramanujan has made contributions to the analytical theory of numbers and has also worked on elliptic functions, continued fractions and infinite series.


    Ramanujan was born on December 22, 1887 in Erode, Madras. As a student, he faced numerous difficulties in Primary school. In High school he developed an interest in learning and proved to be an all round scholar. In 1900, he began to work on his own on mathematics, summing geometric and arithmetic series.


    During High school he came across a book by G.S. Carr called Synopsis of Elementary Results in Pure Mathematics. This book helped him learn mathematics without any help. This book was published in 1856, which was out dated by the time Ramanujan laid his hands on it. This is when he began upgrading theorems and in the process, created new theorems as well.


    Slowly and steadily he showed a deep interest in the subject. He began mathematical research. He investigated the series ∑ (1/n) and calculated Euler's constant to 15 decimal places. He began to study the Bernoulli numbers, although this was entirely his own independent discovery.


    In 1904, Ramanujan was awarded the K. Ranganatha Rao prize for mathematics by the school's headmaster, Krishnaswami Iyer. Iyer introduced Ramanujan as an outstanding student who deserved scores higher than the maximum marks. He received a scholarship to study at Government Arts College, Kumbakonam. The following year, however, his scholarship was not renewed so he devoted his time to mathematics. Without the money he soon started facing difficulties and ran away from home to Vishakapatnam.


    He continued his mathematical work, this time on hypergeometric series and investigated relations between integrals and series. He was to discover later that he had been studying elliptic functions.


    Ramanujan continued studying fractions and divergent series in 1908. At this stage he became seriously ill again and underwent an operation in 1909. Soon after this, he was married.


    This did not change anything. He continued to develop his mathematical ideas and began to pose problems and solve problems in the Journal of the Indian Mathematical Society. After publishing a research paper on Bernoulli numbers in 1911 he gained recognition for his work. Despite his weak educational background, he became well known in Madras as a mathematical genius.


    Ramachandra Rao who was a Collector at Nellore helped Ramanujan get a job of a clerk at The Presidency College in Madras. In 1913, Narayana Iyer, Ramachandra Rao and E. W. Middlemast tried to present Ramanujan's work to British mathematicians. M.J.M. Hill of University College London, commented that Ramanujan had the ability and talent but due to a weak educational background the foundation could not accept him as a mathematician. Soon after this, Ramanujan wrote to G.H. Hardy.


    It was a series of formulae which was hard to believe as it came from an unknown mathematician. The theorems were breathtaking and Hardy couldn’t believe it. He wrote to Ramanujan inviting him to England where Ramanujan spent nearly five years in Cambridge collaborating with Hardy and Littlewood.


    In 1918, he became the first Indian to be elected a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge.


    Staying away from home, he fell sick and was diagonised with Tubercolosis and confined to a sanatorium. Ramanujan returned to Madras, and died in 1919.


    Ramanujan’s work has played a fundamental role in the mathematics of the 20th century. His theorems are used far and wide for solving various problems. He is considered to be India’s greatest mathematician after Aryabhata and Bhaskaracharya.






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    THE MAN WHO KNEW INFINITY....

    vry talented man..........



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    Quote Originally Posted by Facele$$ View Post
    THE MAN WHO KNEW INFINITY....

    vry talented man..........



    indeeed........!!!




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    This guy was genius........no doubt !!!!!
    "I'm always ready to learn although I do not always like being taught"

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    gr8 man .............














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    ....................................
    Live amongst people in such a manner that if you die they weep over you and if you are alive they crave for your company.

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    Bushara, I can't resist to share what I read about this great man. Hope you don't mind. -


    When he was in hospital, Hardy, along with two or three other mathematician friends, went to see him. As it happened, he parked his car in such a place so that Ramanujan could see its number plate. When Hardy went into Ramanujan’s room, he told Hardy that his number plate was unique: it had four special aspects to it. After that, Ramanujan died. Hardy took six months to understand what Ramanujan meant, but he could only discover three of the four aspects. On his death he left a will that research work on that number should continue, to find out the fourth aspect. Because Ramanujan had said there was a fourth, there had to be. Twenty-two years after Hardy’s death, the fourth was discovered. Ramanujan was right.

    Whenever he began to look into any mathematical problem something began to happen in the middle space between his two eyebrows. Both his eyeballs turned upwards, centering on that middle space. In Yoga, that space is described as the third eye spot. It is called the third eye because if that eye becomes activated it is possible to see events and scenes of some different world in their entirety.
    It is like looking out of your house through a small hole in the door, and suddenly, when the door opens, you see the whole sky. There is a space between the two eyebrows where there is a small aperture which sometimes opens – as in the case of Ramanujan. His eyes rose to his third eye while solving a problem. Neither Hardy could understand this phenomenon nor would other Western mathematicians ever understand it in the future.

    Source – Osho Book “Dimensions Beyond the Known”
    ............retired.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger69 View Post
    Bushara, I can't resist to share what I read about this great man. Hope you don't mind. -


    When he was in hospital, Hardy, along with two or three other mathematician friends, went to see him. As it happened, he parked his car in such a place so that Ramanujan could see its number plate. When Hardy went into Ramanujan’s room, he told Hardy that his number plate was unique: it had four special aspects to it. After that, Ramanujan died. Hardy took six months to understand what Ramanujan meant, but he could only discover three of the four aspects. On his death he left a will that research work on that number should continue, to find out the fourth aspect. Because Ramanujan had said there was a fourth, there had to be. Twenty-two years after Hardy’s death, the fourth was discovered. Ramanujan was right.

    Whenever he began to look into any mathematical problem something began to happen in the middle space between his two eyebrows. Both his eyeballs turned upwards, centering on that middle space. In Yoga, that space is described as the third eye spot. It is called the third eye because if that eye becomes activated it is possible to see events and scenes of some different world in their entirety.
    It is like looking out of your house through a small hole in the door, and suddenly, when the door opens, you see the whole sky. There is a space between the two eyebrows where there is a small aperture which sometimes opens – as in the case of Ramanujan. His eyes rose to his third eye while solving a problem. Neither Hardy could understand this phenomenon nor would other Western mathematicians ever understand it in the future.

    Source – Osho Book “Dimensions Beyond the Known”
    The number that is being talked about is "1729"


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    List of numbersIntegers
    1k 2k 3k 4k 5k 6k 7k 8k 9k
    1729
    Cardinal
    One thousand seven hundred
    [and] twenty-nine

    Ordinal
    1729th
    Factorization
    7 . 13 . 19
    Divisors
    1, 7, 13, 19, 91, 133, 247, 1729
    Roman numeral
    MDCCXXIX
    Greek numeral
    ,αψκθ
    Binary
    11011000001
    Octal
    3301
    Duodecimal
    1001
    Hexadecimal
    6C1

    1729 is the natural number following 1728 and preceding 1730. 1729 is known as the Hardy–Ramanujan number after a famous anecdote of the British mathematician G H Hardy regarding a hospital visit to the Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan In Hardy's words:


    I remember once going to see him when he was ill at Putney. I had ridden in taxi cab number 1729 and remarked that the number seemed to me rather a dull one, and that I hoped it was not an unfavorable omen. "No," he replied, "it is a very interesting number; it is the smallest number expressible as the sum of two cubes in two different ways."
    The two different ways are these:
    1729 = 13 + 123 = 93 + 103
    The quotation is sometimes expressed using the term "positive cubes", since allowing negative perfect cubes (the cube of a negative integer) gives the smallest solution as 91 (which is a divisor of 1729):
    91 = 63 + (−5)3 = 43 + 33
    Of course, equating "smallest" with "most negative", as opposed to "closest to zero" gives rise to solutions like −91, −189, −1729, and further negative numbers. This ambiguity is eliminated by the term "positive cubes".

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