View Poll Results: PM for 2014

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  • Narendra Modi

    75 89.29%
  • Nitish Kumar

    2 2.38%
  • Mulayam Singh

    0 0%
  • Rahul Gandhi

    7 8.33%
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Thread: Best PM candidate for 2014 - My Vote - Narendra Modi

  1. #1
    SB MahaGuru Colonel dsocialdoctor's Avatar
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    Default Best PM candidate for 2014 - My Vote - Narendra Modi

    In April of last year, while on the stump for Delhi’s local body elections, Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit picked on an unlikely campaign theme, which held no relevance to the bijli-sadak-pani issues that agitated voters’ minds. Addressing an election rally in the Old Delhi constituency of Ballimaran, which has a high concentration of Muslim voters, Dikshit pulled out the same old bogeyman that that the Congress has been invoking for more than a decade now to keep old wounds agape in the hope 0f profiting electorally from the politics of identity.

    Dikshit said at that time that the BJP often claims that Narendra Modi would be its next Prime Ministerial candidate, “but they never call him for campaigning in elections.” She even proffered a ‘reason’ for this. “It’s because,” she said, “they know that if ever comes here, he will be stoned by the people.”
    On Wednesday, Sheila Dikshit was given a lesson in humility – and on the vicissitudes of politics.
    Narendra Modi inspires Young India in a way that Rahul Gandhi doesn’t. PTI.

    Narendra Modi, the bogeyman she invoked, rode into town like a strong gust of the wild West Wind, and far from being “stoned by the people”, was received with much adulation for channelling a vibrant, can-do spirit among the cream of Delhi’s youth, and for instilling in them a yearning to reach for the stars – for their own sake and for their country’s.
    And what kind of a day did Sheila Dikshit herself have? She was, metaphorically speaking, pelted with verbal stones for her statement that plumbed the depths of widespread despair over an ineffectual government that cannot provide women of Delhi the most fundamental of rights: the right to safety.
    For sure, there were a few hundred student protestors, most of whom held Leftist affiliations, who gave voice to their dissent over the invitation extended by a reputed academic institution to Modi. In their ideologically-motivated estimation, Modi represents the sum of all evil, and the invitation to address business students gave him a free pass to advance what they perceive as his prime ministerial aspiration.
    But it’s just as true that Sheila Dikshit herself cannot walk 20 paces in Delhi today without requiring her security cordon to whisk her away to safety from those who feel incensed by her government’s abject failure to offer governance – and her recent attempts to milk the popular outrage against the Delhi gang-rape to shore up her dwindling popularity.
    But yesterday wasn’t about Sheila Dikshit, a septuagenarian politician who has lost the trust of her people and remains in office solely on the strength of the backing of India’s foremost political dynasty, to which she pays ritual obeisance in public – as when she tearfully kissed Sonia Gandhi‘s hand at the recent Congress conclave in Jaipur.
    Yesterday was about Modi, who even at age 62 demonstrates an enviable ability to connect with young audiences and inspires them to rise above their constituency – of caste, religion and class – and dream big dreams, by holding out inspirational examples of entrepreneurial success from his home State of Gujarat that are worthy of emulation.
    That someone who doesn’t hail from an aristocratic class (far from it, in fact), who started life as a tea vendor, but was propelled by a quirk of circumstances to become Chief Minister of arguably India’s most industrialised State – and who, despite the aberration of the 2002 riots, has raised the benchmark for good governance in India, isn’t easy to explain.
    But it is this that stands in stark contrast to a Manmohan Singh or a Rahul Gandhi. Manmohan Singh, for all the respect he once commanded for his erudition, has abysmally failed to channel the restless energy of India’s youth. Instead, alongside Sonia Gandhi, he has guilt-tripped an entire generation of Indians into believing that they are not worthy of higher aspiration. That’s pretty ironic, since the first-generation of India’s economic reforms in 1991, which unleashed Indian entrepreneurial energy, happened when he was Finance Minister (although the political risk was borne by Prime Minister PV Narasimha Rao).
    Likewise, Rahul Gandhi, who although younger to Modi by 20 years and given to spouting management jargon, has failed to articulate anything close to a larger vision that resonates with young audiences beyond corralled Congress supporters. (Watch this recent interaction of Rahul Gandhi with Young India, at which he channelled the Kennedy-esque ‘Ask not what your country can do for you’ sentiment, but came across merely as someone who ‘outsources’ all responsibility for India’s problems to the very people who ask him to outline his vision.)
    Management guru Peter Drucker defined leadership as “lifting a person’s vision to high sights, the raising of a person’s performance to a higher standard, the building of a personality beyond its normal limitations.” On that count, Modi’s speech to Young India on Wednesday ticked all those boxes: he demonstrated, as nearly as words can, that a nation buoyed by a forward-looking, hope-inspiring leader can aspire to reshape its destiny.
    There may be many reasons not to have a Prime Minister like Modi. Those affronted by his government’s perceived complicity in or passivity during the 2002 riots have made a persuasive case for a decade now. And, yet, today, the critical consideration that ought to weigh with voters is the opportunity cost that India would pay if it persists with dysfunctional non-governance of the sort that Manmohan Singh offered for close to a decade – and which Rahul Gandhi will likely continue. For that would truly crush India’s spirit for eternity, and India deserves better than that.
    Modi, for all his perceived faults, today channels the aspirations of an India that can break free of the politics of caste, class and religion, change its karma, and strive for excellence. He has demonstrated this in Gujarat over the past decade, and reckons that his Gujarat model can be replicated across India, by offering “less government, more governance.”

    It is this template, more than anything else about Modi’s record in office in Gujarat, that requires pan-national amplification. Our national discourse on economics, which has always been weighted in favour of the far left, needs a corrective balancing force. Even the BJP, for all its record of advancing economic reforms between 1999 and 2004, has lost its nerve and is positioning itself even further to the left of the Congress. That economic discourse, like much of the dead political thought that characterises the polity today, needs a countervailing force. It would be vastly improved by having a strong gust of a wild wind whip up some creative destruction, engender a Clash of Ideas and clear the cobwebs.
    Whenever Manmohan Singh wanted to hardsell his economic reforms (in the time that he was committed to them), he was given to quoting Victor Hugo’s line about them being “an idea whose time has come.”
    Much the same can be said of Narendra Modi today.

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    SB MahaGuru Colonel dsocialdoctor's Avatar
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    No one jokes about Narendra Modi. If you google “Narendra Modi jokes”, you get links to news items about Modi joking about something, or Congress statements that “Rahul vs Modi” is a joke. But when you google “Manmohan Singh jokes” or “Rahul Gandhi jokes”, hundreds of authentic gags pop up. And Twitter overflows daily with cheeky one-liners about them. But no one jokes about Modi. Apparently, you can hate him or love him, but he has left no scope in the public space for satire, irony or disdain.


    Modi is clearly a force the likes of which Indian politics has not seen for decades. And when on Wednesday, at the Shri Ram College of Commerce (SRCC), he delivered his first speech in Delhi after his victory in Gujarat, what one saw was a man at the top of his game. At the very least, it was a lesson to every Indian politician on what to say and how to say it to young Indians.


    The statistic we are constantly bludgeoned with is that nearly 60% of India is under the age of 40. A recent Asian Development Bank report mentions a more palpable figure: a million young Indians will be joining the workforce every month for the next 20 years. This is both terrifying and exhilarating. How Indian polity and economy respond to this will, quite simply, determine the country’s future for the next 50 years. If these massive waves of aspiration find no productive network of channels, we could be looking at a disaster of unimaginable scale: a tsunami of anarchic despair. At SRCC, Modi faced 1,800 soon-to-be members of that great wave. Yes, they will be among the most privileged (SRCC is the country’s top commerce college), but Modi’s words went out to millions of other young men and women looking for their destinies, which will in time shape India’s future.


    No one writing about what Modi said can escape comparing it with Rahul Gandhi’s speeches to the youth. Rahul, whose party has been in power at the Centre for most of the years India has been independent (and currently for eight straight years), talks usually of a rotting corrupt exclusionary system and appeals to the young that only they can change it. In contrast, Modi, who has ruled Gujarat for more than a decade now, showered the audience with examples to prove that he has brought great prosperity to Gujarat, using the same laws, officials, government machinery—that is, the same system. Underlying message: Stop blaming the system, because the system is you, and you can do better if you want to.
    Anant Rangaswami has very perceptively pointed out in firstpost.com: “Decode (Modi’s) speech, and these are the words which pop out: Development, education, youth, progress, brands, india, success, profit and wealth creation, going abroad, pride, technology, brains and employment. That about covers all that the youth focus on.” Dripping with positivity, Modi almost seemed like a professional motivational speaker, using pithy metaphors, humorous anecdotes and simple examples. One metaphor will surely be remembered for a long time. Holding up a glass of water, he said: “Some say this is half empty, others say this is half full. I say this is full, half with water, and half with air.” This is corny, but this is young populist corn at its best. In social media, a new word has already been born: Modivation.
    He delighted his audience with the sort of acronyms that the young thrive on: P2G2 (pro-people good governance), 5F (farm to fibre to fabric to fashion to foreign), 3S (skill, scale, speed). He spoke of building India’s largest convention centre in 162 days, of having 50% of India’s gross domestic product under one roof in his Vibrant Gujarat summit, of having completely eradicated 120 cattle diseases in six years (SRCC’s principal provided further proof of Modi’s efficiency when he said that the college had invited 11 people, including five cabinet ministers, to address the students, and Modi’s office was the first to reply; some replies were still awaited).
    Modi played masterfully with words when he said that we are now seen, not as a nation of snake charmers, but mouse charmers. Congress’s riposte, that the IT revolution was started by Rajiv Gandhi, was silly and irrelevant. Modi was not claiming credit for India’s IT boom; in fact, he ascribed it all to the Indian youth.


    In essence, while Rahul says that India needs the young to save the country, Modi said that India is rocking because of its young, and they should just keep following their dreams tenaciously and carry the nation with them. And when he said that the nation has had enough of vote bank politics, it was now time for development politics, that the government had no business to be in business, that the only way forward was minimum government and maximum governance, his words resonated in every jaded middle-class heart.


    The past two years have taught us that the Indian middle class can no longer be defined by mere demographics. It is an outlook that has little to do with income, defined by aspiration, pride, utter lack of faith in the state, and a willingness to fight for one’s rights. Modi addressed 1,800 college students, but he spoke to that larger mindset across India and may just have connected with millions.


    Whether he will ever be the prime minister (PM), and whether his being PM is a good thing are questions that time and circumstances will answer. But Modi’s performance at this premier Delhi college stamps him as the one Indian politician who truly has his finger on the pulse of a very large section of the population, while perfectly disguising his appeal in trans-political garb.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dsocialdoctor View Post

    why doc no support for Shri L.K. Advani this time..????
    Koi Roko Na Deewane Ko

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    SB MahaGuru Colonel dsocialdoctor's Avatar
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    • Modi was born on 17 September 1950 to a middle-class family in Vadnagar in Mehsana district of what was then Bombay State, India.
    • Modi is a vegetarian.
    • During the Indo-Pak war in the mid sixties, even as a young boy, he volunteered to serve the soldiers in transit at railway stations.
    • As a young man, he joined the Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad, a student organisation and was involved in the anti-corruption Nav Nirman Movement.
    • After working as a full-time organiser for the organisation, he was later nominated as its representative in the Bharatiya Janata Party.
    • As a teenager Modi used to run a tea stall with his brother.
    • Modi completed his schooling in Vadnagar.
    • He earned a masters degree in political science from Gujarat University

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    SB MahaGuru Colonel dsocialdoctor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by invincible07 View Post
    why doc no support for Shri L.K. Advani this time..????
    1. He himself is supporting Modi
    2. at this Situation and present dynamics, Modi is the best available and only option to lead our country.

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    SB MahaGuru Colonel dsocialdoctor's Avatar
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    • Modi was a pracharak (full-timer) in the RSS during his university years.
    • He took up the challenging task of energising the party cadres in right earnest.
    • In partnership with Shankersinh Vaghela, Modi set about creating a strong cadre base in Gujarat.
    • In the initial period, Vaghela was seen as a mass leader, while Modi was recognised as a master strategist.
    • The party started gaining political mileage and formed a coalition government at the centre in April 1990.
    • This partnership fell apart within a few months, but the BJP came to power with a two-thirds majority on its own in Gujarat in 1995.
    • During this period, Modi was entrusted with the responsibility of organising two crucial national events, the Somnath to Ayodhya Rath Yatra (a political rally through India on a converted Toyota van) of L.K. Advani and a similar march from Kanyakumari (the southernmost part of mainland India, southernmost point of India being Indira point of Andaman and Nicobar islands) to Kashmir in the North.
    • After the exit of Shankarsingh Vaghela from the BJP, Keshubhai Patel was made Chief Minister while Narendra Modi was sent to New Delhi as a General Secretary of the Party.
    • In 1995, Modi was appointed the National Secretary of the party and given the charge of five major states in India.
    • In 1998, he was promoted as the General Secretary (Organization), a post he held until October 2001.

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    SB MahaGuru Colonel dsocialdoctor's Avatar
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    mallik!! Major avdhut123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dsocialdoctor View Post
    1.
    at this Situation and present dynamics, Modi is the best available and only option to lead our country.
    agreed.............................
    “India won’t change because we are not changing .”


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    SB Champion Captain silver_surfer's Avatar
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    tfs.......

    abhi dilli aur 2014 dono dur hai..........

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    HALLA BOL Field Marshal amitsush's Avatar
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    mulayam singh

    ye bhi race mein kya
    I WILL LOOK FOR U
    I WILL FIND U AND
    I WILL BAN U


  13. #13
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    First Choice - Narendra Modi. Although Nitish Kumar is not far behind.
    But, Mulayam Singh is only regional leader, with age old mentality just win on vote bank politics.

    and for Rahul Baba ---
    better to project P chidambaram, A K Anthoni or at least Manmohan Singh.

  14. #14
    :: The Zenith :: Lieutenant-Colonel
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    We knew ur vote, thread banaane ki zarurat nahi thi...

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    ..Yaar Patialavi.. Colonel a_decent_1's Avatar
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    Voted Narendra Modi.
    My Personality depends on who I am.My Attitude depends on who you are.
    a_decent_1™ ©®

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