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Thread: Classic down memory lane : History of cricket

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    Default Classic down memory lane : History of cricket

    I wish some cricket lovers really love to read most of past cricket records, in this classic down memory lane,i will starts with may 1st.whats happen on may 1st in any of year ?

    I carefully selects May because test cricket completed 140 years recently as First test took place on May 1877.once and while I will mention ODI as well as First class cricket.
    Last edited by UpdateA1; 05-05-2017 at 02:12 PM.

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    Thumbs up MAY 1ST.Back Memory Year

    May 1 down the years

    1951
    In Barbados, the great Gordon Greenidge is born. When he was 12, his parents moved to Reading, and as a result Greenidge played for Hampshire and qualified for England, but instead of Greenidge and Gooch we had Greenidge and Haynes, the finest opening partnership in West Indies' history and one of the best anywhere. Greenidge was the enforcer, square-cutting, hooking and driving new-ball bowlers into submission. He was deadly on one leg, as England, battered for 214 not out at Lord's in 1984, would testify. Menacing and brutal, Greenidge made six of his 19 Test hundreds in England, including 134 (out of 211) and 101 on a spiteful Old Trafford surface in 1976. He also made 93 and 107 on his debut, against India in Bangalore in 1974-75.
    1991
    And on his 40th birthday, Greenidge played his last Test innings. Against Australia in Antigua, he was run out for 43, as West Indies failed to chase an unlikely target of 455. Greenidge went on the tour of England that followed but injured his knee in the second one-day international, his last appearance for his country.


    1929
    West Indian legspinners usually invite the same degree of mirth as Scottish goalkeepers, but Trinidadian Sonny Ramadhin, who was born today, was the real thing. Long before the doosra was a glint in Saqlain Mushtaq's eye, Ramadhin flitted between leg- and offspinners with no noticeable change in action. After only two first-class matches apiece, he and Alf Valentine ripped through England in 1950 as West Indies pulled off a famous and unlikely series win. Ramadhin took 26 wickets in four Tests, but his best figures came seven years later - 7 for 49 at Edgbaston, followed by 2 for 179 in the second innings, as Peter May and Colin Cowdrey padded England to safety in an unforgettable stand of 411. Ramadhin bowled 98 overs in that second innings, and 129 in the match; both are Test records.


    1963
    A damp start to the world's first one-day competition as the Gillette Cup match between Lancashire and Leicestershire at Old Trafford was forced into a second day by rain. Lancashire scored 304 for 9 in their 65 overs (reduced to 60 overs-a-side in 1964) and bowled Leicestershire out for 203.

    1995
    One of the finest moments of Steve Waugh's career, and a seismic day in Jamaica. Waugh paid West Indies back for years of pain with an unyielding Test-best 200. He had come to the crease with the match and series in the balance - Australia were 73 for 3 in reply to West Indies' 265, but with his brother Mark he added a momentous 231 for the fourth wicket. West Indies subsided second time round, and their famous run of 15 years without a Test-series defeat was over.

    1954
    A prolific wicketkeeper is born. Taslim Arif made his Pakistan debut as a batsman - when he ground out 90 and 46 against India in Calcutta in 1979-80 - but had the gloves for the rest of his Test career. In his third Test, against Australia the same winter, Taslim made a mighty seven-hour 210 not out, the highest score by a wicketkeeper in a Test till Andy Flower made 232 not out in 2000-01. Taslim played at the same time as Wasim Bari, a vastly superior gloveman, and so figured in only six Tests; he ended with a batting average of 62.62.

    1957
    Birth of the dashing Australian batsman Rick Darling, whose 14-Test career was over before he turned 23. He got his chance early because of World Series Cricket and impressed with his fearless cutting and hooking. But with that came the impetuosity of youth, and Darling often wasted a good start. His finest innings came in Sydney in 1978-79, when he laced 91 in a low-scoring match against England. In that same series, in Adelaide, Darling almost died when the gum he was chewing lodged in his throat after he was hit on the heart by a ball from Bob Willis. John Emburey, with a hearty thump, came to the rescue.

    1930
    Don Bradman started as he meant to go on by hammering 236 in his first first-class innings in England, in a tour match against Worcestershire. For good measure, he made 185 not out in his next innings, against Leicestershire.

    1889
    Birth of the former Kent captain John Evans, who played one Test for England - against Australia at Lord's in 1921 - but who is more famous for escaping a Prisoner of War camp in the First World War. After that he wrote The Escaping Club, a classic book about his breakout.

    Other birthdays
    1920 Myrtle Baylis (Australia)
    1927 Israr Ali (Pakistan)
    1932 Don Pringle (East Africa)
    1947 Ghulam Abbas (Pakistan)
    1953 Elquemedo Willett (West Indies)
    1955 Julien Wiener (Australia)
    1970 Iris Jharap (Netherlands)
    1974 Jo Garey (Australia)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    May 2 down the years

    1969
    Brian Lara, who was born today, was one of the game's most exciting batsmen, and the author of some of the most famous innings of all time: 375, 400 and 501, the highest in Test and first-class history, as well as 213 and 153 not out to single-handedly beat Australia in 1998-99. But his career had its fair share of problems and run-ins with authority, and as a captain he often struggled to inspire colleagues, although he was battling to lead a side in decline. Many hoped he would bow out on a high at the World Cup in the Caribbean, but West Indies were poor and Lara quit as captain amid rumours that he was pushed by the board. He deserved better.

    1901
    Birth of the studious, systematic England batsman and captain Bob Wyatt, who played 40 Tests between 1927-28 and 1936-37. Wyatt, who was comfortable opening or in the middle order, made both his Test centuries against South Africa, at Old Trafford in 1929 and at Trent Bridge six years later. He first led England against Australia at The Oval in 1930, but in all, England won only three matches out of 16 under his stewardship. He was also vice-captain on the Bodyline tour. In fact, Bodyline was first bowled under him in a state game when Douglas Jardine was absent.

    1986
    Birth of legspinner Yasir Shah, who filled a large hole in Pakistani hearts when Saeed Ajmal was banned for chucking in 2014. Replacing Ajmal in the side for two Tests against Australia, Yasir took 12 wickets, and then 15 more in three Tests against New Zealand, becoming the quickest Pakistan bowler to 50 wickets - in nine matches. In his first 25 Tests, Yasir took match hauls of seven or more wickets 12 times, ten of those in victories - the most famous one coming in 2016 at Lord's, where he took his first ten-wicket haul.

    1993
    Five years after his debut, Carl Hooper finally ma de his first Test hundred in the Caribbean. And he turned it into a massive unbeaten 178, which included four sixes and came from only 247 balls, as Pakistan suffered in the Antigua sun. He added 106 for the last wicket with Courtney Walsh, manipulating the strike so expertly that Walsh faced only 31 balls in 23 overs. In that time, though, Walsh managed to rub salt into Pakistan's wounds, spanking 30 to equal his Test best.

    2002
    In three days, Pakistan recorded the fifth-biggest victory in Test cricket, against New Zealand in Lahore, thanks to two outstanding performances: a triple-century from Inzamam-ul-Haq, and a career-best 6 for 11 by Shoaib Akhtar. Inzamam gave only one chance in his innings; his first 100 came in 191 balls, the second in 132, and the third, which contained seven fours and four sixes, at a run a ball, as he became the second Pakistani after Hanif Mohammad to make 300. That set the stage for Shoaib to steam in to take four in 25 balls. He sprained his ankle when he tripped over in his follow-through and had to retire, but he returned on the third day to take two more and New Zealand were bowled out for 73 - the lowest innings total in Lahore - and for 246 in the second dig.

    1982
    South African offspinner Johan Botha, born today, made his international debut when Nicky Boje pulled out of a tour of India in 2005-06 due to match-fixing concerns. However, in 2006, shortly after his Test debut, he was reported for having a suspect action and banned from bowling in international cricket by the ICC. Though cleared later, Botha continued to be called for an illegal action over the years. Despite these setbacks, he became a useful limited-overs player, even captaining South Africa in ODIs and T20Is. In 2013, he asked to be released from his national contract so he could take charge of South Australia.

    2001
    A tragic end to the second ODI between West Indies and South Africa in Antigua, when Craig Edwards, a local man, was stabbed to death after getting involved in an argument with another spectator as they danced in the Double Decker stand.

    1990
    Australian allrounder Simon O'Donnell thrashed 50 off only 18 balls against Sri Lanka in Sharjah, a one-day record until Sanath Jayasuriya got to work. In all, O'Donnell crashed 74 not out off 29 balls, an innings that included six fours and four sixes, and it was all very infectious: even David Boon belted 30 off just 18 balls.

    1960
    One of Sri Lanka's first Test-class seamers is born. Ravi Ratnayeke ploughed a fairly lone furrow in the 1980s, and was only on the winning side once in 22 Tests. He was to the fore there, though, taking 5 for 37 in the second innings in Colombo in 1985-86 as Pakistan went down by eight wickets. Ratnayeke had also taken 8 for 83 against the Pakistanis in Sialkot earlier that winter, still the best Test figures by a Sri Lankan not called Muttiah Muralitharan. Ratnayeke could bat too - he was sometimes used as an opener - and made five Test fifties, all of them in his last eight Tests.

    1894
    Big cricket's first one-day match. Long before the idea to put cricketers in pyjamas was conceived, MCC thrashed Sussex in a day at Lord's to kick off the domestic season. MCC made 105, then Sussex were blown away for 42 and 59.

    Other birthdays
    1910 Laurie Nash (Australia)
    1914 Dennis Dyer (South Africa)
    1925 David Ironside (South Africa)
    1929 Graham Gedye (New Zealand)
    1940 Bryan Davis (West Indies)
    1955 Ian Callen (Australia)
    1973 Julie Hayes (Australia)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.
    Last edited by UpdateA1; 05-05-2017 at 02:42 PM.

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    May 3 down the years

    David Hookes smashed a first-class century in just 34 balls

    1955
    The dazzling Australian left-hander David Hookes, born today, looked like he had it all. Before he'd even played first-class cricket, he whacked six sixes in an over in a club game for Dulwich. At the age of 21 he hit five centuries in six innings for South Australia. And in 1982-83 he creamed the fastest authentic century in cricket history, pasting a furious hundred off just 34 balls for South Australia against Victoria in Adelaide. But his Test career was frustratingly unfulfilled. He thrillingly smashed five successive fours off Tony Greig on debut, in the Centenary Test of 1976-77, but his only hundred in 23 appearances came against a poor Sri Lankan side, in Kandy in 1982-83. Hookes' life ended in tragic circumstances in January 2004, at 48, when he succumbed to his injuries after he was assaulted following an altercation outside a Melbourne hotel. At the time he was enjoying a successful stint as Victoria's coach.

    1978
    With Australia about to win the fifth Test in Jamaica, it wasn't rain that saved West Indies, but a riot. In Bobby Simpson's last Test, the Aussies needed just one more wicket with 38 balls left when the crowd took matters into their own hands after Vanburn Holder was given out caught behind. The match could have been finished the next day, but one of the umpires, Ralph Gosein, refused to stand.

    2015
    A series-levelling win for West Indies over England in Barbados. It came on the back of a lacklustre away season and World Cup for West Indies, and the incoming ECB chairman, Colin Graves, had described the hosts as "mediocre" before the series began. They were trailing 0-1 coming into Barbados, where they restricted England to 257 in the first innings. Then, though they folded for 189 (featuring an attacking 85 by Jermaine Blackwood) themselves, England's second-innings collapse to 123 left West Indies chasing a tricky 192. They got there thanks to Blackwood and Darren Bravo. For England it was an extension of their inconsistent away form. Jonathan Trott, recalled to the side, announced his retirement from international cricket after his failures in the series.

    1867
    Only three bowlers have ever taken more first-class wickets than Middlesex and England's JT "Old Jack" Hearne, who was born today. A fast-medium bowler with a textbook action, he took 3061 wickets in all. Three of them gave him England's first hat-trick against Australia, at Headingley in 1899, and it was a seriously illustrious trio: Clem Hill, Syd Gregory and Monty Noble. Three of his cousins and two of his brothers played for Kent, while Young Jack Hearne - who was said to be a distant cousin - also played for England. Old Jack died in Buckinghamshire in 1944.

    1945
    Birth of the youngest of the famous Pakistani Mohammad brothers. Sadiq Mohammad was a wristy left-hand opener with a full complement of strokes all round the wicket. He was generally a dasher, but one of his finest innings owed more to restraint - a six-hour 97 on a dodgy Headingley wicket in 1978. He also made 69 and 37 on his debut, against New Zealand in Karachi in 1969-70, when, for the only time in a Test, he opened with his brother Hanif. Along with Zaheer Abbas, the stocky Sadiq also gave great service to Gloucestershire.

    1983
    Stuart Matsikenyeri, born today, made his debut as an opener against Pakistan in Bulawayo in November 2002. He played one match in the 2003 World Cup, and played in the NatWest Series in England later that year, scoring a vital 44 at Trent Bridge in a four-wicket win. He got his first one-day half-century in 2004 against England in Bulawayo, in a game Zimbabwe lost. The year 2007 was especially productive for Matsikenyeri - he made three half-centuries and averaged 32.11 from ten matches.

    1979
    In the 11 Tests he got to play, many as an injury replacement for Matthew Hayden or Justin Langer, Phil Jaques, born today, averaged 47 and scored three hundreds, the best being 150 against Sri Lanka in Hobart in 2007. Persistent back trouble cut short his Test career, though he remained a domestic giant. In 2012, Jaques announced his retirement from Australian first-class cricket to continue his career with Yorkshire, whom he helped win promotion to Division One for the second time.

    1990
    Cricket Australia thought so highly of fast bowler James Pattinson, born today, that they gave him a central contract in 2011 and picked him for the tour of Sri Lanka when he had only played six first-class matches. Pattinson only made his Test debut against New Zealand in Brisbane later that year, but the talent was evident when he took 5 for 27 in the second innings. He took two more five-fors in his next nine Tests, though, like many modern fast bowlers, he was in and out of the side due to injuries. On Australia's 2012-13 tour of India, Pattinson was one of four players axed from the Mohali Test for disciplinary reasons. Injuries continued to plague him - especially a recurring shin problem - but he managed to play a full series against West Indies at home in 2015-16 in which he took 13 wickets.

    1948
    Some debut for Cambridge University's Hubert Doggart, who made 215 against Lancashire at Fenner's in his maiden first-class innings. Doggart went on to play twice for England against West Indies two years later, while still captain of Cambridge, but with less success, and he was dropped after England's infamous Lord's defeat in 1950.

    1874
    Birth of Bert Hopkins, Australia's gentle, slow-medium swing bowler. His first Test wickets were a distinguished pair: CB Fry and Ranjitsinhji, when Hopkins surprisingly opened the bowling at Lord's in 1902 and reduced England to 0 for 2. He didn't take another wicket in the series, though. Hopkins could bat too, and often opened for his state, New South Wales. It's a good thing he did, because in a quarter of his 20 Tests, he did not get a bowl at all.

    Other birthdays
    1844 Thomas Kelly (Australia)
    1876 EB Dwyer (England)
    1904 Austin Matthews (England)
    1979 Abdool Samad (Canada)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    Default May 4 Down The Year

    May 4 down the years

    Wasim Akram had earlier taken a hat-trick against West Indies, also in Sharjah
    1990
    A second one-day hat-trick in six months for Wasim Akram, as Pakistan beat Australia by 36 runs in the Sharjah final. Wasim finished things off by bowling Merv Hughes, Carl Rackemann and Terry Alderman with consecutive deliveries. Wasim is the only man to have taken two hat-tricks in Tests and one-day internationals.

    1981
    Jacques Rudolph, who was born today, appeared to suffer as a result of South Africa's quota system, but in April 2003, when he got his chance, he made it count with a superb unbeaten 222 on debut against Bangladesh in Chittagong. Four more centuries followed in the next three years but 125 runs from six innings against Australia in a 3-0 whitewash dented his prospects. In January 2007 he decided to move to Yorkshire, suspending his international career with South Africa, but he returned in 2010 and was the leading run-getter in the SuperSport series, scoring 954 runs in 17 innings for Titans. His form continued into the 2011-12 season and he was rewarded with a recall to the South Africa Test squad for their home series against Australia.

    1875
    A dual international, and one with divided loyalties, is born. As well as playing rugby for England, Reggie Schwarz played 20 Tests for South Africa in their formative years. He was an offspinner with a difference - a wristspinner who only bowled the googly, often to a 6-4 leg-side field. He took 55 wickets at an average of 25, with a strike rate of a wicket every 48 balls, sensational for a spinner. He died in Etaples, France, in 1918.
    1985

    The birth of Ravi Bopara, a wristy batsman and an on-and-off member of the England set-up. He made his first international half-century in his fourth innings - at the 2007 World Cup - but his Test debut, against Sri Lanka in Kandy later that year, wasn't as successful. Three consecutive hundreds against West Indies in early 2009 saw him grow in stature but a difficult Ashes series was to cost him his place. He went on to score consistently at the county level but untimely injuries prevented his return to Tests in early 2012. His form in limited-overs cricket, where his medium-pace bowling is also a useful option, has been more consistent.

    1960
    Birth of England's Martyn "Frog" Moxon, the unluckiest of the eight men to make 99 in a Test but never a century. Against New Zealand in Auckland in 1987-88 Moxon swept three runs flush off the middle early in his innings, only for the umpire to give them as leg-byes. It was an error that proved costly when he fell to Ewen Chatfield on 99. In the next Test, in Wellington, he was set to right the wrong, but rain washed out the last two days with Moxon stuck on 81 not out. That was as close as he got in ten appearances.

    1957
    An Australian legspinner is born. Peter Sleep, one of the many relatively anodyne slow bowlers given a chance before Shane Warne arrived, was rather innocuous at Test level, as a strike rate of a wicket every 96 balls suggests. He did win an Ashes Test, though, in Sydney in 1986-87, taking his only five-for in the second innings of a match better remembered for Peter Taylor's debut exploits. Sleep, who was wittily nicknamed "Sounda", also made three Test fifties, and was a Lancashire League regular for many years, before becoming captain and then coach of Lancashire's 2nd XI.

    1970
    Paul Wiseman, the New Zealand offspinner who was born today, struggled for opportunities because of the excellence of Daniel Vettori. He played a couple of match-winning hands, though. On his debut in Colombo in 1997-98, he bowled Sri Lanka to defeat with seven wickets, including five in the second innings. And he took eight more when Zimbabwe were beaten at Bulawayo three years later.

    1983
    The birth of allrounder Daniel Christian, a flag-bearer for the Aboriginal community. He won selection to Australia's T20 squad in 2009-10, and played a big role in South Australia lifting the domestic T20 trophy in 2011. He received a call-up for Australia's Test series against New Zealand in December 2011, but did not debut. His biggest pay-day came a month later, when he was picked up by Deccan Chargers for a whopping $900,000. Christian made his one-day debut in the CB Series in February 2012 and took a hat-trick in a five-for against Sri Lanka in Melbourne. He played series in West Indies and UAE that year, but was dropped after no significant contributions. He returned for Australia in 2014 to play a few more limited-overs matches, including one World T20 game in Dhaka.

    Other birthdays
    1867 Nicolaas Theunissen (South Africa)
    1959 Lynette Cook (Australia)
    1962 Rose Signal (New Zealand)
    1962 Liz Signal (New Zealand)
    1980 Cheraldine Oudolf (Netherlands)
    1984 Manzarul Islam (Bangladesh)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    Default May 5th :Down The Years


    May 5 down the years

    Herbie Taylor captained South Africa in 18 Tests either side of World War I

    1889
    Birth of Herbie Taylor, South Africa's first world-class batsman and an absolute master on matting pitches. Taylor's finest innings was a brilliant 176 against England in Johannesburg in 1922-23, a match in which the next-highest score was 50, and one of only four occasions Taylor was on the winning side in his 42 Tests. In all, he made three centuries and a 91 in that series; all of his seven Test hundreds came against England. He was captain for 18 Tests either side of the First World War, in which he served in the Royal Field Artillery. Taylor took up coaching schoolboys upon retirement, and died in Cape Town in 1973.

    1933
    One of Jamaica's favourite sons is born. "Collie" Smith was an attacking batsman, an outstanding fielder and a useful offspinner, who gave up fast bowling as a young man in a bid to emulate his hero Jim Laker. In 1954-55, in only his third first-class match, he cracked 169 against the touring Australians, and was given a Test debut on his home ground as a result. He flashed a superb 104 in the second innings, although it wasn't enough to save West Indies from defeat. Smith's last Test hundred came in Delhi in 1958-59, when he also took his only five-for. He was only 26 when he was killed in a car crash in Stoke-on-Trent in 1959, in which Garry Sobers was also involved. When Smith's body was returned to Jamaica, over 60,000 people attended his funeral.

    2010
    A historic day for women's cricket. West Indies' Deandra Dottin smashed the first T20 hundred, off just 38 balls, en route to a 45-ball 112 against South Africa's women in the World T20 in St Kitts. The second fifty of the whirlwind innings came up in 13 balls as West Indies raced to their first win of the tournament, one where they would eventually lose to New Zealand in the semi-final.

    1911
    A distinctly unlucky one-cap wonder is born. Lancashire's Norman Oldfield did not do a lot wrong when he made a stylish 80 and 19 in his England debut, against West Indies at The Oval in 1939. But that was the last Test before the Second World War, and when Test cricket returned, Oldfield was well into his thirties, and past his prime. He later became an umpire and officiated in two Tests. He died in Blackpool in 1996.

    1962
    Another one-cap wonder is born. James Whitaker was a member of England's Ashes-winning side in 1986-87. He made his one appearance in Adelaide, when Ian Botham was injured, and managed 11 before falling to Bruce Reid. With David Gower and Phil DeFreitas also playing, England included three Leicestershire players for the first time. Whitaker remained a one-club man, and led Leicester to the County Championship in 1996 and 1998. After being forced to retire with a leg injury he had a spell as general manager at Grace Road.

    2003
    The day Jermaine Lawson completed a hat-trick in the third Test against Australia in Barbados. After picking up the wickets of Brett Lee and Stuart MacGill in the first innings, Lawson struck with his very first ball of the second innings when he trapped Justin Langer lbw. That, though, had absolutely no bearing on the result of the Test as Australia knocked off a meagre eight required for victory and took an imposing 3-0 lead in the series. After the next match of the series that contained the historic 418-run chase, Lawson's action came under scrutiny by the ICC.

    1968
    An Australian coach is born. Talented wicketkeeper-batsman Tim Nielsen, who made 316 first-class dismissals for South Australia, went on to assist John Buchanan in coaching the Redbacks and then the Australian team. In 2007 he took over the national role from Buchanan, but it was a period of transition for the team and Nielsen's reign saw them lose two successive Ashes series and the World Cup title, which they had held since 1999. He stepped down in 2011 and took on a youth-development role for South Australia.
    Other birthdays

    1909 Grace Morgan (England)
    1927 Sid O'Linn (South Africa)
    1964 Glenda Hall (Australia)
    1969 Karen Le Comber (New Zealand)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    May 6 down memory lane

    Neil Foster: the only man to hand out ducks to both Javed Miandad and Viv Richards in Test cricket

    1962
    A metallic fast bowler makes his entrance. Back and knee injuries plagued the career of Essex seam bowler Neil Foster, who was born today, so much that the plates in his body once apparently set off an airport metal detector. In all, he had as many as nine knee operations, and the problems jinxed a fine career. Fozzie had a beautiful, upright action, which generated prolific outswing and seam movement both ways. And he had the priceless ability to dismiss good batsmen: he is the only man to snare both Javed Miandad and Viv Richards for 0 in Tests.


    1988
    When he sits back to chew on a modest Test average of 31, Graeme Hick will look back at one moment in particular as tantalising proof of what might have been. On this day in Taunton he completed his remarkable 405 not out for Worcestershire against Somerset, an innings that included 35 fours and 11 sixes. It was the highest score in first-class cricket in England for 93 years (since Archie MacLaren hit 424 for Lancashire, also in Taunton) and a measure of the innings is that in the whole match nobody else got more than 56. Hick might well have beaten the first-class record of the time, Hanif Mohammad's 499, but his captain, Phil Neale, was more concerned with winning the game, which Worcester did.

    1922
    A remarkable - and possibly unique - record by the wonderfully named Jennings Tune. Playing for Cliffe against Eastrington in Yorkshire's Howden and District League, Tune achieved near perfection with figures of 10 for 0, and all ten victims were clean-bowled. Others have taken all ten for no runs, but none, as far as we know, all bowled.

    1965
    Australia's highest opening partnership. Given West Indies' history of new-ball devastation, it's slightly strange that they have been on the wrong end of two of the five highest opening partnerships in Test history. One of those was on this day in Barbados, as Bill Lawry and Bob Simpson became the first opening pair to both score double-centuries in the same innings of a Test. In all, they added 382, but it wasn't enough for victory: Seymour Nurse made a double-century of his own for West Indies as the match drifted towards a draw.

    1970
    As he punished county attacks with a series of swashbuckling innings for Derbyshire and Sussex, Chris Adams, who was born today, looked tailor-made to be the middle-order enforcer England were lacking. But a series in South Africa was an unforgiving baptism - though he got to play all five Tests, he managed a top score of 25, and those were his only Tests. Adams led Sussex to their first County Championship win in 2003, and was rewarded by being named one of Wisden's Five Cricketers of the Year for 2004. He went on to be an articulate TV pundit.

    1947
    Birth of Andy Roberts. Not the Andy Roberts, but the New Zealand allrounder who played seven Tests in the mid-1970s. His Test career never really got going, although he did crack an impressive unbeaten 84 against India in Kanpur in 1976-77. He died in Wellington in 1989, aged only 42.

    Other birthdays
    1917 Roy Scott (New Zealand)
    1927 Michael Frederick (West Indies)
    1932 Eileen Hurly (South Africa)
    1981 Laxmi Ratan Shukla (India)
    ESPN Sports Media Ltd.
    Last edited by UpdateA1; 06-05-2017 at 02:44 PM.

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    May 7 down the years




    How long does it take to score 333? About five hours?




    When Duleepsinhji made 21 more in one innings than the opposition in the match




    1930
    Rich entertainment for the crowd in Brighton as the great Duleepsinhji laced a glorious 333 in just over five hours for Sussex against Northants. It was his highest first-class score, and 21 more than Northants managed between them in two innings. Only three batsmen have ever scored more runs in a day in first-class cricket: Brian Lara leads the way with the last 390 of his famous 501 not out for Warwickshire in 1994.


    1966
    Birth of the West Indian fast bowler Anderson Cummins, a man best known for a match he didn't play in. In South Africa's first Test back - in Barbados in 1992 - West Indies gave a debut to Kenny Benjamin, instead of the local boy Cummins. The match was boycotted as a result, and one banner - "No Cummins, no goings" - summed up the mood. Cummins did eventually play five Tests but did better in the one-day arena. In 2006-07 he made an unexpected return when he was drafted into the Canadian national side at the age of 40, 11 years since his last major outing. He revisited the Caribbean as part of Canada's 2007 World Cup squad, though he was, unsurprisingly, a shadow of the player he had been.


    1972
    Legspinner Upul Chandana, born today, made his one-day debut in 1994 and got into Sri Lanka's Test squad five years later, but it wasn't till 2003 that he began to hold his place down. While earlier he was valuable as a hard-hitting batsman in the middle order, by 2004, Chandana's bowling had improved vastly. But his form fell away and he was dropped late in 2005, though he made one rather unexpected one-day appearance in July 2007, soon after which he retired. Chandana then joined the ICL but returned to domestic cricket when the ban was lifted in 2008. His best one-day performance was 5 for 61 against South Africa in 2004.


    1980
    New Zealand offspinner Jeetan Patel, born today, made his one-day debut in 2005. In his first nine ODIs he took 13 wickets, and he made his Test debut soon after, in Cape Town in April 2006 - a match in which he took 3 for 117. In the 2007 World Cup he took seven wickets in six matches. He got a second chance in Tests in 2008, when he took six wickets against West Indies in Napier in December. He played a big part in Warwickshire's run to the 2012 County Championship and this led to a recall to the New Zealand side for the tour to India later that year. Two years later, after another spell out of the side, he made himself unavailable for selection for New Zealand's tour to the West Indies so that he could focus on a full season with Warwickshire. He did make it back into the national side the following year, though.


    1949
    Proof that university games weren't always a walkover. An Essex attack that included Trevor Bailey got a bit of a shock when John Dewes and Hubert Doggart added an unbroken 429 at Cambridge, at the time the highest second-wicket partnership in English domestic history. In fairness to the Essex boys, these weren't just any old scruffy undergraduates: Dewes had already played in a Test for England, Doggart would do so the following year.


    1991
    In the most thrilling finish imaginable, Haryana beat their hosts, Bombay, by just two runs in the Ranji Trophy final. Chasing 355 in 67 overs on a worn last-day pitch, Bombay looked dead at 305 for 9, but Dilip Vengsarkar cracked the target within range as the debutant Abey Kuruvilla held on grimly at the other end. Vengsarkar walloped 26 off one over, until, with three needed, Kuruvilla was run out after a mix-up. Vengsarkar, who was left undefeated after a marvellous 138-ball 139, wept in the middle at the finish.


    1886
    Birth of the Surrey and England seamer Bill Hitch, famous for his unusual, hopping run-up. As well as being genuinely fast with the ball, he was a fine short leg and a lusty lower-order hitter. He smeared 51 not out in the last innings of his modest seven-Test career. Hitch later coached Glamorgan. He died in Cardiff in 1965.


    1900
    In an amazing County Championship match in Bradford, Worcestershire skittled Yorkshire for 99... and lost by an innings. That's because they were blown away for 43 and 51 themselves, with Wilfred Rhodes returning match figures of 11 for 36.




    Other birthdays
    1941 Grahame Bilby (New Zealand)
    1955 Karen Price (Australia)
    1975 Ashley Cowan (England)
    1979 Jon Kent (South Africa)
    1982 Qaiser Abbas (Pakistan)


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    Last edited by UpdateA1; 07-05-2017 at 08:27 AM.

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    May 8 down the years
    The man who became part of cricket's dictionary
    Michael Bevan: the original iceman at the death.


    1970
    One of the world's best one-day batsmen is born. Michael Bevan introduced the word "finisher" into the cricket dictionary with a series of performances as cool and calm as his nudging, scampering style was frenetic. He announced his retirement in 2007, three years after he played his final ODI, and was one of only two batsmen to average over 50 when he quit. A visitor from Mars might find it extraordinary that such a run machine played relatively few Tests, but after a promising start (82, 70 and 91 on anaesthetised Pakistani pitches in 1994-95) his weakness against the short ball was exposed.

    1938
    If Pakistani batsmen are renowned for their swashbuckling flair then Javed Burki, who was born today, was the exception that proved the rule. Burki, the first cousin (and childhood hero) of Imran Khan, was stoic in defence, and his three Test centuries were fairly painstaking affairs. They all came against England in a five-Test, nine-month period in 1961-62. He captained Pakistan to England in 1962 when he was only 24, but they were hammered 4-0 and Burki lost his job. He later became an ICC match referee.

    1942
    Birth of an Englishman who smashed a century off 45 balls against Australia. The genial Robin Hobbs was playing for Essex in a tour match when he pummelled Jim Higgs and Ashley Mallett all round Chelmsford. Hobbs' day job was as a legspinner, the last such specialist to play for England for over 20 years before Ian Salisbury in 1992, although he struggled for penetration in his seven Test appearances.

    1902
    Birth of Curly Page, New Zealand's second Test captain. A fine performer in whatever sport he chose, he was especially prominent in cricket and rugby; he was an All Black scrum-half in 1928. Page was a member of New Zealand's first cricket team to England, in 1927, when he made over 1000 runs. He made the trip again in 1931, and was captain of the touring team in 1937. He played in 14 Tests, scoring 492 with an average of 24.60. His one century, 104 at Lord's in 1931, came in a dramatic New Zealand comeback.

    1985
    A dramatic collapse in Jamaica put the seal on another comfortable West Indies series win. New Zealand had to win the match to square the series, an unlikely prospect as soon as they followed on, 225 behind. But when they closed the third day on 211 for 1, anything was possible. Sadly for New Zealand, what happened was a Malcolm Marshall-induced slide from 223 for 1 to 283 all out, which left Gordon Greenidge and Des Haynes to knock off the 59 needed for a second consecutive ten-wicket victory.

    1908
    Northants were demolished for just 27 and 14 by Yorkshire in their County Championship match at Northampton. No Northants player reached double figures, and George Hirst, whose match figures were 12 for 19 off 20.1 overs, also managed more runs in one knock (44) than Northants mustered in both innings. Their aggregate of 42 was the lowest in first-class history at the time, and remains the second lowest.

    1896
    Another good day for Yorkshire, who made the highest total in County Championship history. From the relative depths of 448 for 7, they reached the lofty heights of 887 against Warwickshire at Edgbaston, with four batsmen making centuries, then promptly reduced their hosts to 31 for 5. Not content with bashing 85 from No. 10, George Hirst then took 8 for 59. But though Warwickshire followed on, 684 runs behind, Yorkshire, not entirely surprisingly, ran out of time, although this was in the days before they were allowed to declare.

    1873
    Birth of Henry Leveson Gower (pronounced Loosen Gore), who only played three Tests, in South Africa in 1909-10, but who had a big role in the development of the game in England. He played for Surrey and was later their president. He also chaired the England selection committee for a time and ran the Scarborough Cricket Festival for nearly 50 years. Leveson Gower was knighted for his services to cricket in 1953, and died in Kensington a year later.

    1923
    Nobody has scored more first-class centuries than Jack Hobbs, who made 199, and on this day in Bath he made the 100th of those 199, for Surrey against Somerset. Hobbs had gone for 0 in the first innings, when Surrey were skittled for 91, but his 116 not out was enough for them to win a thriller by ten runs.

    Other birthdays
    1950 Gillian McConway (England)
    1959 Ingrid Jagersma (New Zealand)
    1961 Riaz Poonawalla (UAE)
    1993 Pat Cummins

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    May 9 down the years
    World Series Cricket reeled in some big names

    1977
    The day the world's top cricketers turned pirate. That was the Daily Mail headline when the Australian TV magnate Kerry Packer's plans for World Series Cricket were leaked. John Arlott called it "a circus"; EW Swanton ended his friendship with the England captain Tony Greig, Packer's most significant signing and the man who persuaded a legion of other stars to sign up, including Viv and Barry Richards and Dennis Lillee. In the end, World Series Cricket went on for only 17 months before Packer got his wish - the broadcast rights for Test cricket in Australia - but the legacy lives on. Coloured clothing and floodlights revolutionised the game, and without Packer, one-day cricket as we know it today would not exist.

    1988
    Birth of tiny Bangladesh wicketkeeper Mushfiqur Rahim, who replaced Khaled Mashud as the team's first-choice keeper in the 2007 World Cup and got the gloves in Tests a few months after the tournament. In 2010 he made his maiden Test century - off just 112 balls - against a strong Indian attack, which might have helped make up for missing the milestone six months earlier in an ODI. A year later he was named captain after Shakib Al Hasan was sacked following a disappointing tour of Zimbabwe, and found early success when Bangladesh beat India and Sri Lanka to make it to the Asia Cup final. In 2013, he led Bangladesh to a 3-0 ODI whitewash of New Zealand at home. His batting, meanwhile, grew from strength to strength: behind Tamim Iqbal and Shakib, he was the team's third-highest scorer across formats in the period between the 2011 and 2015 World Cups, and in March 2013 he produced Bangladesh's first Test double-century. Bangladesh's ODI form fell away in 2014, though, and Mushfiqur was stripped of the captaincy in the format but continued to lead in Test cricket.

    1932
    One of West Indies' finest openers is born. Conrad Hunte was a fluid, silky batsman, especially off his legs - although he cut out many of the shots at the highest level - and got his Test career off to a storming start. He made 142 on his debut, against Pakistan in Barbados in 1957-58, and added two more hundreds in his next three Tests. That included a mighty 260 in Jamaica, when he and Garry Sobers added 446 and Sobers went on to make 365 not out. Hunte, a dignified and popular character, was crucial to West Indies' success: he averaged 51 when they won, 27 when they lost. And to average over 45 throughout a career while opening the innings is impressive at the best of times; in Hunte's case even more so given that he had no regular opening partner. He later became an ICC match referee and was knighted shortly before he died, of a heart attack while playing tennis in Sydney in 1999.

    1959
    A late bloomer is born. Andrew Jones' unorthodox batsmanship was not seen in the Test arena until he had almost turned 28, when he made his New Zealand debut against Sri Lanka in Colombo in 1986-87. Jones was a purist's nightmare, but you can't argue with an average of 44, particularly in a side that won only six of his 39 Tests. Jones loved a scrap, and was ruthless when set: five of his seven hundreds - all of which came in drawn Tests - were in excess of 140. That included his Test-best 186 against Sri Lanka in Wellington in 1990-91, when he and Martin Crowe added 467, at the time a Test record for any wicket.

    1934
    Having started Australia's tour of England with scores of 206 and 65, Don Bradman met his match when he was bowled for 0 - against Cambridge University. The bowler was offspinner Jack Davies, who went on to have a decent career with Kent and was later president of MCC. For such an unbelievably brilliant batsman, Bradman could be a nervous starter: one in every ten of his Test dismissals was for a duck. For bowlers, the problem was when he got in: Bradman scored an amazing 29 centuries in only 80 Test innings.

    1907
    Birth of the man who led West Indies to their first series victory. Jackie Grant's last series as a Test player was in 1934-35, when his side famously and surprisingly beat England 2-1 in the Caribbean. Grant, who studied at Cambridge University, was a gutsy batsman and a brilliant fielder. He made 53 and 71 (both not out) on his debut against Australia, in Adelaide in 1930-31, but managed only one other fifty. His brother Rolph also captained West Indies. Jackie died in Cambridge in 1978.

    1901
    Birth of the Lancashire and England wicketkeeper George Duckworth, who played 24 Tests between 1924 and 1936. He was best known for his extremely vocal style of appealing, and his dexterous keeping. In an era when wicketkeepers were not expected to deliver with the bat, Duckworth more often than not came in at No. 11. He died in Warrington in 1966.

    1943
    Fourteen Tests for Maurice Foster of Jamaica, who was born today, but West Indies won only one of them, at Lord's in 1973. Foster was a dogged batsman who never really got going at Test level, though he did make his only Test century on his home ground, against Australia in 1972-73. His flat offspinners were successful at first-class level, less so in Tests, as a strike rate of a wicket every 197 balls testifies.

    1959
    Birth of the man who bowled Sri Lanka's first ball in Tests. With his brisk outswingers, Ashantha de Mel toiled manfully in his country's early years, but it was a pretty thankless task: they won only two of the 17 matches he played in. He had a hand in both of those, though, with five wickets against India in Colombo in 1985-86 and six more against Pakistan the same season. After injury forced him to retire, de Mel represented Sri Lanka at bridge and even made an appearance in the Commonwealth Games. Later he served as a national cricket selector.

    1970
    John Davison, born today in British Columbia, moved to Australia as a child, and played grade cricket in Melbourne. After failing to keep a regular place in Victoria's first team, Davison received an offer from Canada as player-coach during the off season. He was soon drafted into the national side and made the headlines by hitting the fastest World Cup century at the time in the 2003 edition. He was appointed Canada's captain in 2004 and the following year, in their first first-class match for more than half a century, he created history by taking 17 for 137, the best since Jim Laker in 1956, and hitting 84 as they beat USA by 104 runs in the Intercontinental Cup. Davison went on to play the next two World Cups and retired at the end of Canada's disappointing 2011 campaign.

    Other birthdays
    1907 Tom Killick (England)
    1945 Malcolm Nash (England)
    1960 Iain Butchart (Zimbabwe)
    1971 Roydon Hayes (New Zealand)
    1971 Kalyani Dhokarikar (India)
    1980 Sean Clingeleffer (Australia)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    May -10 Down the year
    Tauseef Ahmed took 93 wickets in 34 Tests


    1958
    An unsung hero is born. Pakistan's Tauseef Ahmed tended to be overshadowed by his more illustrious colleagues Abdul Qadir and Iqbal Qasim, but he was a skilled and cunning offspinner, even if his afro and moustache did make him look like Lionel Richie. He took seven wickets on his debut, after being plucked from nowhere to play against Australia in 1979-80. And he played a huge role in Pakistan's famous 16-run victory over India in Bangalore in 1987, when he and Qasim took nine wickets each, and Sunil Gavaskar wound up his Test career with a masterful 96. Two years later, against Australia in Karachi, Tauseef had match figures of 47.4-28-44-3, par for the course for this thrifty performer, whose average was superior to the great Qadir's.

    1972
    Birth of Stuart Carlisle, Zimbabwe's utility batsman who was moved up and down the batting order without getting a good run in any spot. He was also an excellent fielder, particularly square of the wicket, where he held many stunning catches in one-day cricket. Carlisle inherited the captaincy at the end of a turbulent five-week period in early 2002, after Brian Murphy, Guy Whittall, Heath Streak and Alistair Campbell had all been removed from the post for one reason or another. He lost five out of his six Tests in charge and was sacked and dropped for the 2003 World Cup. He returned for the England tour later that year, and though he broke his hand during the NatWest series he bounced back with his first Test century in October 2003, against Australia in Sydney.

    1944
    An unforgettable debut for Pakistan wicketkeeper Abdul Kadir, who was born today. Pitched in to open against Australia in Karachi in 1964-65, Kadir was run out for 95, after adding 249 for the first wicket with his fellow debutant Khalid Ibadulla. A long career looked assured, but instead Kadir only got three more Tests. The last two were as a specialist batsman, and in his final innings, against New Zealand in Auckland later that winter, he ground out a five-hour 58. In most countries, players aren't considered for Test cricket until they've reached manhood; Kadir's top-level career was over before he turned 21.

    1867
    Wicketkeeper James Kelly, born today, played 36 Tests for Australia between 1896 and 1905. Thirty-three of those were against England and on his first tour there, in 1896, he took 37 catches and effected 22 stumpings. On the 1899 tour there, he scored a battling 33 in Leeds after Australia had slipped to 39 for 5. He was never in the same league as Jack Blackham as a keeper but kept impressively to the fast Ernie Jones, Hugh Trumble, Jack Saunders, Monty Noble, Warwick Armstrong and Bill Howell on wickets that varied in pace from day to day.

    1956
    Birth of Chris Kuggeleijn, the New Zealand offspinner who is best remembered for one piece of fielding. His first significant act as a Test player, against India in Bangalore in 1988-89, was to take a slip catch to get rid of Arun Lal and make Richard Hadlee the highest wicket-taker in Tests. Kuggeleijn, whose middle name is Mary, was 32 when he made his debut, but bowling in India is a pretty thankless task for a spinner: he was given only 16.1 overs in his two Tests, and took just the one wicket.

    Other birthdays
    1897 Dalton Conyngham (South Africa)
    1914 Molly Flaherty (Australia)
    1963 Haafiz Shahid (Pakistan)

    ================================================
    ================================================

    -May 11 down the years
    The second half of Ian Redpath's Test career was better than the first

    1941
    A career of two halves for the lean and gangling Australian Ian Redpath, who was born today. In his first 33 Tests he made one century and averaged 36. In his last 33 he hit seven centuries and averaged 50. Redpath started out as a bit of a dasher but soon turned himself into something of a stonewaller - his one-day international average was a mere 9 - and he didn't hit a six until his penultimate Test, against West Indies in Adelaide in 1975-76, when he got so giddy that he immediately cracked another one. Redpath was later awarded an MBE, and upon retirement resumed a career in antique-dealing and went on to coach Victoria.

    2016
    Tony Cozier, one of the game's most respected commentators, and possibly the most authoritative voice on Caribbean cricket in his time, died on this day in his native Barbados, aged 75, after an illness. Cozier started his career as a newspaper journalist and began his commentary career during Australia's tour of West Indies in 1965. Over five decades Cozier had worked in radio and television, wrote books, and was published in newspapers, magazines and on the internet. He was also a columnist for ESPNcricinfo.


    1944
    The younger Benaud is born. John Benaud was always going to be overshadowed by his older brother Richie, but he forged a good career for himself as a muscular, destructive batsman for New South Wales. He played three Tests too, all in 1972-73; in his second appearance he thrashed 142 against Pakistan at the MCG, a furious innings played in the knowledge that he had already been left out of the next Test. He was also once banned for two matches for wearing the wrong shoes. An astute captain of his state, Benaud later became a national selector during Australia's renaissance under the captaincy of Allan Border.

    1853
    Australia's first wicketkeeper is born. Jack Blackham's presence in the inaugural Test, in Melbourne in 1876-77, meant that Fred Spofforth did not play, in protest - he wanted Billy Murdoch behind the stumps instead - but Blackham soon established himself as a keeper of rare subtlety and class. He frequently stood up to the quicker bowlers without a long stop, and only Bert Oldfield, Ian Healy and Adam Gilchrist have made more than his 24 Test stumpings for Australia. Blackham could scrap down the order too, and made a couple of fifties in Australia's win over England in Sydney in 1882-83. In all, he played in seven different Test series in England, once as captain, in 1893. He died in Melbourne in 1932.

    2001
    More problems for Herschelle Gibbs, who was fined along with four of his team-mates and the team physiotherapist Craig Smith after admitting to smoking marijuana in a hotel room in Antigua during their West Indies tour. It completed a bad 12 months for Gibbs: as well as being banned for six months for his part in the match-fixing scandal, he was given a suspended sentence for going to a nightclub on the eve of a one-day international against Australia.

    Other birthdays
    1881 Pompey Norton (South Africa)
    1944 Carol Marrett (New Zealand)
    1967 Jamie Brayshaw (Australia)
    1972 Jacob Martin (India)

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    Last edited by UpdateA1; 13-05-2017 at 08:27 AM.

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    Folks,
    I posted may 10 and may 11 together
    Last edited by UpdateA1; 13-05-2017 at 08:25 AM.

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    May 12 down the years

    Hugh Trumble took 141 wickets in just 32 Tests

    1867
    Birth of the first man to take two Test hat-tricks. Australian offspinner Hugh Trumble managed them both on his home ground in Melbourne - and both against England too, in 1901-02 and 1903-04. An extremely tall man who made the ball rip spitefully on wet wickets, Trumble's finest performance came in defeat, when he took 12 for 89 against England at The Oval in 1896. After Trumble's efforts, Australia were left chasing 111 to win; they collapsed to 19 for 8 and were eventually all out for 44. He also bowled England to defeat with 7 for 28 in his final first-class match, the Melbourne Test of 1903-04, when he took his second hat-trick. Trumble died in Melbourne in 1938.


    1978
    Thomas Odoyo, born today, was the first player from a non-Test playing team to achieve the double of 1500 runs and 100 wickets in ODIs. For several years he formed a reliable new-ball partnership with Martin Suji, and in 1997-98 he shared in a then-world record ODI stand of 119 for the seventh-wicket with his brother Tony against Zimbabwe. His consistent performances led to him winning the inaugural ICC Associate ODI Player of the Year in 2007.


    1979
    Birth of Robert Key, who was marked for great things ever since he helped England win the Under-19 World Cup in 1998, but with a top score of 47 from his first eight Tests (in 2002 and 2003), he didn't live up to the expectations. In 2004, however, he burst back into the limelight, scoring 1000 first-class runs by the second day of June, and cracking a magnificent 221 against West Indies at Lord's, in his first Test appearance for over a year. The jury was still out after a hit-and-miss winter in South Africa in 2004-05 and Key lost his place in the Test side, but he continued scoring for Kent, for whom he was appointed captain in 2006. He quit first-class cricket in 2016.


    1987
    Though he made a century on first-class debut Kieron Pollard, born today, is better known for his T20 batting exploits, and some eye-popping catches on the boundary. In fact, that first hundred included 11 fours and seven sixes. Pollard made his one-day debut in the 2007 World Cup and then secured a US$750,000 IPL contract with Mumbai Indians. But for all his big hitting he only scored his first one-day hundred in his 51st match, in 2011. The year before that Pollard, along with Dwayne Bravo, did as many feared, and turned down a West Indies central contract so he could play in T20 leagues around the world. Apart from the IPL, Pollard looks in at the CPL, the Big Bash, England's T20 Cup, the BPL, and the PSL.


    1903
    James Parks, who was born today, was an outstanding allrounder for Sussex, and in first-class cricket he scored over 20,000 runs and took more than 800 wickets. In 1937 he scored 3003 runs and took 101 wickets, a unique performance. He only played one Test, though, against New Zealand at Lord's that year, when he trapped the great Martin Donnelly for 0 in Donnelly's first Test innings. Parks' son Jim also played for England, and his grandson Bobby for Hampshire. Parks died in Sussex in 1980.


    1890
    Against MCC, Sussex's Jesse Hide became only the fourth man to take four wickets in four balls - and the first to do so at Lord's. He was not the last to do so at Lord's, though: Frederick Martin achieved the feat for MCC against Derbyshire in 1895, and 12 years later Albert Trott did it in his benefit game, for Middlesex and Somerset (a game in which he also took another hat-trick in the same innings).


    1946
    A debut centurion is born. Guyanese opener Len Baichan was unfortunate not to play more than three Tests for West Indies, having made a match-saving 105 not out on his debut, against Pakistan in Lahore in 1974-75. But with Roy Fredericks and Gordon Greenidge on the scene, Baichan struggled to bed down a place. He was inked in for the opener's role on West Indies' tour of India in 1974-75, but a car crash put paid to his participation. Greenidge stepped into the breach, scoring 93 and 107 on debut, and never looked back. Baichan ended with a Test average of 46, a first-class average of 51, and plenty of thoughts as to what might have been, had Greenidge taken the chance to play for England.

    1962
    Birth of Karen Gunn, who played nine Tests and 45 ODIs for New Zealand women. Primarily a bowler, Gunn took 53 ODI wickets at 21.00 apiece, with a tidy economy rate of 2.42. A highlight of her career came right at the very end, when she was an integral part of the New Zealand team that made an unprecedented run to the Women's World Cup final in 1993.

    1909
    Birth of Frank de Caires, the right-hand middle-order batsman who made 80 and 70 in the first Test played in the Caribbean, against England in Barbados in 1929-30. De Caires played only three Tests, though, the last of them in Jamaica in the same series. He died in British Guiana in 1959.

    2001
    The day Mark Lavine, a Barbadian-born allrounder, died after he suffered a heart attack in the Birmingham League. A cousin of Gordon Greenidge, Lavine made his first-class debut for Barbados in 1992-93. He later settled in South Africa.

    Other birthdays
    1894 Donald Knight (England)
    1970 Steve Palframan (South Africa)
    1978 Anna Smith (New Zealand)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    May 13 Down memory Lane

    When West Indies turned the tables on Australia Hamish Blair

    2003
    An amazing turnaround at the tail-end of an amazing Test series. Australia had beaten West Indies in the first three Tests of a four-Test series, and were on top for much of the fourth one, in Antigua, having set West Indies 418 to win - higher than any total previously chased down in Test cricket. West Indies slipped to 74 for 3, and lost Brian Lara for 60 with the score on 165. But Ramnaresh Sarwan, with a feisty 105, and Shivnarine Chanderpaul, with 104, fought back bravely. It was left to Omari Banks and Vasbert Drakes, though, coming together at the fall of the seventh wicket with 46 still required, to finish the game off. Banks, playing just his second Test, made a spirited 47 not out, Drakes made 27 not out, and West Indies made history.

    1946
    Alec Bedser and the rest of the Surrey attack must have been looking forward to putting their feet up when they reduced India to 205 for 9 in a tour match at The Oval. Enter No. 11 Shute Banerjee, who added a staggering 249 for the last wicket with Chandu Sarwate: the second-highest tenth-wicket partnership in first-class history. Both made hundreds (Banerjee 121, Sarwate 124 not out), the only instance of Nos. 10 and 11 both doing so in the same first-class innings. A shell-shocked Surrey were quickly blown away for 135 and eventually beaten by nine wickets.

    1978
    There have been 42 Test hat-tricks but none quite as spectacular as the one taken by Sri Lanka's Nuwan Zoysa, who was born today. Against Zimbabwe in Harare in 1999-2000, Zoysa nailed Trevor Gripper, Murray Goodwin and Neil Johnson with the first three balls he bowled in the match, to leave Zimbabwe tottering on 0 for 3. Zoysa, a tall, brisk left-arm seamer, had a chequered career because of injury and the presence of Chaminda Vaas, another left-armer. The two did combine famously on one occasion, in Kandy in 1999-2000, taking three wickets apiece to reduce Australia to 60 for 7, a collapse that ultimately decided the series.

    1944
    When a man scores 158 in his second Test and 106 in his third, he might reasonably expect a decent run in the side. Clive Radley, who was born today, was not quite so fortunate. A mop-haired middle-order grinder from Middlesex, Radley was already 33 when he made his England debut, and in all he played only eight Tests, ending with 77 and 0 against New Zealand at Lord's in 1978. Five months earlier had come that 158 against the same opponents, an 11-hour marathon on an Auckland shirtfront. Radley carried on for Middlesex until 1987, when he was 43.

    1952
    Birth of Sew Shivnarine, the impish Guyanese allrounder who came into a West Indies team gutted by Kerry Packer. He made a couple of fifties on his Test debut, against Australia on his home ground in 1977-78, and was a handy strokeplayer at No. 6 or 7. His slow left-arm bowling, useful at first-class level, was ineffective in the Test arena, and he took only one wicket in eight Tests. He later played for USA in the ICC Trophy.

    1903
    One of the most visited venues in the world, but on this day the Nursery Ground at Lord's staged its only day of first-class cricket: the third day of a MCC v Yorkshire game. Heavy rain left the main square unusable, so the authorities moved the match 100 yards. Wilfred Rhodes made 98 not out for Yorkshire in the drawn game.

    1904
    Birth of the energetic Australian fast bowler Tim Wall, who played 18 Tests leading up to the Second World War. He had an outstanding debut in 1928-29, when he took 5 for 66 in the second innings to bowl England to defeat in Melbourne. He was also Australia's best bowler in the Bodyline series of 1932-33, when he took 16 wickets at an average of 25. He also took all ten wickets in an innings that season, for South Australia against New South Wales. He died in his native Adelaide in 1981.

    1870
    A South Africa spinner is born - in Yorkshire. George Glover originated from Wakefield but moved to South Africa and eventually played for Kimberley and Griqualand West. He played one Test too, against England in Cape Town in 1895-96. Glover died in Kimberley in 1938.

    Other birthdays
    1871 Paul Kinneir (England)
    1903 Jim Sims (England)
    1960 Denise Emerson (Australia)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    Default May 14

    May 14 down the years

    The birth of the Zimbabwe wicketkeeper... and of ball-by-ball commentary

    1983
    The youngest captain in the history of Test cricket is born. Tatenda Taibu's rise in international cricket was prodigious. He was picked up from Churchill Boys High School, sent off to tour the West Indies in 1999-2000, and quickly became a stand-by for Andy Flower, and later his replacement. An excellent wicketkeeper and a doughty batsman, Taibu was pitchforked into the captaincy in April 2004 as Zimbabwe cricket tumbled into chaos, but within 18 months he had been forced into retirement by threats and intimidation. After spells in Bangladesh and England, he reappeared in Zimbabwe colours in mid-2007. He announced his retirement from international cricket in July 2012 at the age of 29 to focus working for the church.


    1927
    The birth of ball-by-ball radio commentary in the unlikely setting of Leyton, where Essex took on the touring New Zealanders. The Rev. Frank Gillingham was the commentator on the BBC's Light Programme and his four stints only totalled 25 minutes. Reaction was lukewarm but the idea was there to stay. It would be 30 years before non-stop ball-by-ball broadcasts were launched by the BBC, with the birth of Test Match
    Special.

    1948
    In Kanpur, India, one of cricket's most innovative coaches and tragic figures is born. Bob Woolmer's use of computers and his willingness to embrace the unorthodox brought outstanding success: not least a treble for Warwickshire in 1994, a South African side who were close to unstoppable against anyone not wearing a baggier green, and a Pakistan team who learnt the virtues of discipline. Woolmer was a fine batsman too, good enough to play 19 Tests for England. However, his efforts on the field and as a coach will forever be overshadowed by his untimely death at the age of 58 at the 2007 World Cup in Jamaica.

    1955
    Peter Kirsten, who was born today, was almost 37 by the time he made his Test debut, because of South Africa's omission from the Test arena in the 1970s and 80s. His talents were fading by the time he played Test cricket, but he battled doggedly, not least in Adelaide in 1993-94. South Africa had to draw to take the series against Australia, but Kirsten's 79 (in 310 minutes) and 42 (in 259) were agonisingly in vain. He made his only Test hundred at Headingley in 1994, in his penultimate Test.

    1941
    Nasim-ul-Ghani, born today, was the youngest Test cricketer at the time when he made his debut against West Indies, at 16. Primarily a left-arm spinner whose main weapon was flight, he could also bowl medium pace, and he was a versatile batsman too: he opened the batting for Pakistan and also came in at No. 11. At Lord's in 1962 he struck a century - the first by a Pakistani in England - having come in as a nightwatchman . He was assistant manager on Pakistan's 1996 tour of England and has since had a spell as a national selector, an ICC development officer in South Asia, and a match referee.

    1959
    Birth of Carlisle Best, the Barbadian who began his Test career in true calypso style - his first scoring shot was a hooked six, third ball, off Ian Botham. That was in Jamaica in 1985-86, but Best's best came four years later, also against England. On his home ground he laced a tremendous 164 in a series-levelling victory. That was his zenith: his next four innings, in Pakistan in 1990-91, brought scores of 1, 8, 6 and 4. Best was not picked again.

    1918
    Arthur McIntyre, who was born today, played only three Tests for England, but that owed more to the brilliance of Godfrey Evans than any of McIntyre's own failings. He started life as a legspinner, and first kept wicket in an emergency, but became a key member of the all-conquering Surrey side of the 1950s, and was a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1958. He was later Surrey's coach.

    1933
    Birth of the Gloucestershire and England allrounder John Mortimore, who never really cracked it in nine appearances at Test level. He averaged 24 with the bat and 58 with the ball, but was more effective in county cricket, where he and fellow offspinner David Allen formed an outstanding partnership. Mortimore took four wickets in five balls against Lancashire at Cheltenham in 1962, and captained Gloucester between 1965 and 1967. He was also bowling when Lancashire's David Hughes launched his famous twilight assault - 24 off an over - in the Gillette Cup semi-final of 1971 at Old Trafford.

    1910
    A prodigy is born. Ken Viljoen made his debut for Griqualand West at 16, and was thrown into the South African Test team at 20, against England in Johannesburg in 1930-31. South Africa won that game, but it was one of only two victories in 27 appearances for Viljoen. He was a serene, classy batsman whose first Test hundred, against Australia in Melbourne in 1931-32, came at the beginning of a run of scores of 0, 111, 2, 0, 1, 1 and 0. He died in Krugersdorp, Transvaal in 1974.

    Other birthdays
    1972 Morshed Ali Khan (Bangladesh)
    1980 Josephat Ababu (Kenya)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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