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Thread: Classic down memory lane : History of cricket

  1. #46
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    Thumbs up June 13 Tuesday

    June 13 down the years
    'How does it feel to drop the World Cup?
    South Africa's costliest dropped catch

    Herschelle Gibbs' century was overshadowed by the costly drop of Steve Waugh

    1999
    "How does it feel to drop the World Cup, Herschelle?" That's what Steve Waugh supposedly said to Herschelle Gibbs on this day, when Gibbs, in prematurely celebrating catching Waugh at midwicket, threw away a chance to put Australia out of the tournament, at Headingley. Waugh had 56 at the time - he'd come to the crease with Australia on the brink at 48 for 3, chasing 272 - and went on to an awesome 120 not out. Not only did it keep Australia in the Cup, it put them above South Africa in the Super Six stage, an incidental detail at the time but one that would be of monstrous significance when the two sides tied in the semi-final four days later.

    1905
    In Sarodar, India, one of England's most stylish batsmen is born. Kumar Shri Duleepsinhji - Duleep to most people - was the nephew of the great Ranjitsinhji, and had all of his wristy class and grace. His finest innings was a sensational 173 against Australia at Lord's in 1930. It was Duleep's first innings in an Ashes Test, but he ended up on the losing side after Don Bradman piled up 254. He only played 12 Tests because of poor health, but ended with an outstanding average of 58. Duleep also cracked 333 in a day for Sussex, against Northamptonshire at Hove in 1930. He later became High Commissioner for India in Australia. He died of a heart attack in Bombay in 1959
    .
    1961
    Raman Subba Row saved England with a three-day vigil after they had conceded a first-innings lead of 321 at Edgbaston. After a 171-minute half-century in the first innings - England were bowled out for 195, following which a hundred from Neil Harvey and a half-century from debutant Bill Lawry put Australia in a seemingly match-winning situation - Row batted between days three and five for a four-hour 112. But there was no danger of a collapse after his dismissal, even though England were still trailing, because Ted Dexter took up the task. His 180 took nearly six hours and saved the first Ashes Test in Edgbaston in 52 years.

    1975
    In the days when cricket was not able to gorge on money from TV, a long-running dispute that threatened a blackout of English cricket on TV was resolved. The BBC upped their offer for rights to the 1975 Ashes and the 1976 West Indies series, as well as the 1975 World Cup and all English domestic one-day competitions for two summers, to ?270,000.

    1970
    Birth of Chris Cairns, the star of a largely faceless New Zealand team. With his clean, muscular hitting, athletic fielding and urgent new-ball bowling, Cairns was for a time arguably the only true allrounder in world cricket, until a string of injuries curtailed his bowling effectiveness. He became only the sixth man to achieve an allrounder's double of 200 wickets and 3000 runs in March 2004, and later that year broke the record for most sixes in Test cricket. He retired from international cricket in 2006, and played in the Indian Cricket League in 2008. In March 2012 he won a libel suit against the former IPL chairman Lalit Modi over match-fixing allegations that related to his stint in the ICL. Two years later he was charged with perjury but was acquitted after a nine-week trial in London in 2015.

    1953
    An amazing performance from Alec Bedser for England against Australia in the first Test, at Trent Bridge - and an ultimately fruitless one. No bowler has returned better match figures than Bedser's 14 for 99 in a Test that his side has not won. Here he took 7 for 55 in the first innings, and England still trailed by 105. Bedser then blew the Aussies away a second time with 7 for 44, but with England seemingly on course for victory, rain washed out all of the fourth day and most of the fifth.

    1972
    A historic victory for England at Old Trafford - their first in the opening Test of a home Ashes series for 42 years. It was a game they bossed from the moment John Snow and Geoff Arnold ripped out the Aussies for 142 in their first innings. England's debutant, one Tony Greig, had a match to remember. He top-scored in each innings, with 57 and 62, and took 4 for 53 in the second innings. Greig had already had some experience of the big time, though - he played in the unofficial series against Rest of the World in 1970.

    1989
    A less auspicious start to an Ashes series for England. They only had to bat out 83 overs to save the first Test on a good Headingley pitch, but they were cleaned up inside two sessions as Terry Alderman, aided and abetted by a rapacious slip cordon, took his second five-for of the match. Amazingly, England started this series as favourites (they went on to lose 0-4; were it not for rain it would have been 0-6), but they blundered from the start. David Gower left out his spinner, John Emburey, and put Australia in on a belte. Two days later they were 601 for 7 - Steve Waugh made 177 of them without looking like getting out - and England never recovered
    .
    1965
    A prodigy is born. It's amazing to think that Maninder Singh's last Test appearance came when he was 27. He was only 17 years 193 days old when he made his Test debut, against Pakistan in Karachi in 1982-83, and was India's youngest cricketer at the time. Maninder was a subtle slow left-armer who seemed a natural heir to Bishan Bedi, even down to the fact that he bowled in a patka. But at the top level he was a bit of a fair-weather performer. Against the heavyweights (Australia, West Indies and Pakistan), he took 45 wickets in 26 Tests at an average of 55. Against the rest (England, Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe) he took 43 wickets in only nine Tests at an average of 19. He was also the last man out in the tied Test against Australia in Madras earlier that winter.

    1879
    A Jekyll-and-Hyde cricketer is born. Nottinghamshire's George Gunn mixed dashing strokeplay and dour defence with bewildering frequency, and as he walked to the crease, nobody quite knew which mood would take him. His zenith was his debut, when he made 119 and 74 against Australia in Sydney in 1907-08. But England lost that, as they did when Gunn made his other Test century, on the same ground that same winter. He hadn't played cricket for 17 years when he returned in the West Indies in 1929-30. Only John Tracios of South Africa and Zimbabwe has had a longer interval between Test appearances. Gunn's brother John and uncle William also played Test cricket. Gunn, who ended with a Test career of exactly 40, died in Sussex in 1958.

    Other birthdays
    1887 Neville Tufnell (England)
    1888 Roy Minnett (Australia)
    1931 Esme Irwin (England)
    1967 Angus Mackay (Zimbabwe)
    1970 Shaun Young (Australia)
    1972 Alex Tait (New Zealand)
    1976 Ian Redpath (Australia)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

  2. #47
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    June 14 down the years
    A captain's dream
    A left-arm colossus is born

    Alan Davidson took 186 wickets in 44 Tests

    1929
    Birth of the Australian fast bowler Alan Davidson, the closest rival to Wasim Akram as the greatest left-arm seamer in history. Like Akram, Davidson was also a lusty lower-order hitter. His finest hour was the tied Test of 1960, which he went into with a broken finger and came out of with a significant record - first man to score 100 runs and take ten wickets in a Test. He was a captain's dream, offering control (his economy rate was 1.97 runs per over throughout his Test career) and penetration. And he delivered in all conditions. In six Tests in India, Davidson took 30 wickets at an average of 15. That included 12 for 123 in Kanpur in 1959-60 - a match that Australia still lost.
    1977
    South Africa's Boeta Dippenaar, born today, made his debut in 1999 and got his maiden Test century the next year against New Zealand at the Wanderers. But he unluckily lost his place at the top of the order once Herschelle Gibbs was recalled. South Africa's disastrous 2003 World Cup gave him another chance and he made it count with an unbeaten 177 against Bangladesh. While his strength was in his timing and reach, Dippenaar struggled to avoid playing across the line and around his back-foot defensive strokes. In a one-day career of over 100 matches, he made four centuries and averaged 42.23. He was part of the Champions Trophy squad in 2006 but was overlooked for the World Cup the following year. After leading the Eagles to the SuperSport Series title in 2007-08, he announced his retirement from
    international cricket.
    1984
    The beginning and the end of England opener Andy Lloyd's Test career. Lloyd was given his Test debut on his home ground of Edgbaston in the first Test against West Indies, but within half an hour he was on his way to hospital, after losing a Malcolm Marshall bouncer that clattered sickeningly into the temple guard of his helmet. Lloyd didn't play any more first-class cricket that summer, and never played for England again.

    1911
    A remarkable double was completed on this day by Leicestershire's CJB Wood, who carried his bat for the second time in the match against Yorkshire in Bradford, and scored a hundred in both innings as well. In all, he batted for 520 minutes and was on the field throughout the match. It was all to no avail, as Yorkshire won by five wickets.

    1979
    Slow torture in a ridiculous World Cup match at Old Trafford, as England bowled Canada out for 45 - in 40.3 overs. Only Franklyn Dennis (21) made double figures, while Chris Old helped himself to figures of 10-5-8-4. England breezed to victory by eight wickets, with the small matter of 46.1 overs to spare.

    1938
    Don Bradman set the tone for a summer of plenty with 144 not out as Australia comfortably saved the first Test against England at Trent Bridge. It was the match in which Charlie Barnett nearly became the first Englishman to score a Test century before lunch. He got to 98 in the first session and reached a century from the first ball after lunch. Bradman, meanwhile, made a century in every Test he batted in that summer, although there were only three: rain washed out the scheduled third, and he was unable to bat in the fifth - when Australia lost by a record innings and 579 runs - because of a fractured ankle sustained while bowling. In 19 Tests in England, Bradman averaged 102.84, with a staggering 11 centuries.

    1976
    Strange goings on in Portsmouth. Less than a year after the vandalising of the Headingley Test pitch, the third day of Hampshire's match against Yorkshire had to be switched after the pitch was dug up overnight. The match ended in a draw.

    Other birthdays
    1923 Don Smith (England)
    1972 Claude Henderson (South Africa)
    1973 Daniel Marsh (Australia)
    1975 James Knott (England)
    1984 Mark Cosgrove (Australia)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    June 15 down the years
    Invasion of the Invincible

    Bradman and Co. wade into England
    Don Bradman scored 138 in the first Test of his farewell series.

    1948
    The first signs of greatness from a side that would later be known as the Invincibles. Don Bradman's Australians hammered a very good England side by eight wickets in the first Test at Trent Bridge, at the beginning of a series they eventually won 4-0. Bradman (138) and Lindsay Hassett (137) gave the Aussies a monstrous first-innings lead of 344. Denis Compton, with a brilliant 184, saved some face for England, but the result was never really in doubt. All this, and Ray Lindwall - the Aussies' main strike bowler - did not bowl any of the 183 overs in England's second innings because of injury.

    1929
    Gubby Allen arrived late for Middlesex's Championship match against Lancashire at Lord's after having to work at a London department store during the morning. When he came on to bowl, he took all ten wickets for 40 in 25.3 overs, including the last four wickets in five balls. It was the last occasion a bowler took all ten wickets in an innings at Lords

    1955
    Australia scored 758 for 8 in the fifth Test against West Indies in Kingston, their highest Test total. Their innings had started badly when they stumbled to 7 for 2, but a Test-record five individual hundreds from Colin McDonald (127), Neil Harvey (207), Keith Miller (109), Ron Archer (128) and Richie Benaud (121) left West Indies wilting. Benaud's hundred came in 78 minutes, and for the first time in Test history five bowlers conceded 100 runs, and a sixth (Garry Sobers) went for 99. Australia went on to win the match by an innings and 82 runs.

    1946
    Birth of Roger Tolchard, the Leicestershire wicketkeeper who ended up playing for England as a specialist batsman in India in 1976-77. He was usually a dasher but ground out a vital five-hour 67 in his debut innings, in Calcutta. All four of his Tests came on that tour, all minus the wicketkeeping gloves, and he went on to make over 15,000 first-class runs. Another Roger, Roger Twose, is his nephew.

    1997
    Sri Lanka's first Test in the Caribbean ended in a six-wicket defeat in Antigua. The usual first-innings five-for from Muttiah Muralitharan had given Sri Lanka a slender lead, but they fell away for 152 in the second innings. That left West Indies to chase 187, and their opening pair of Stuart Williams and Sherwin Campbell polished off 160 of them to leave victory a formality
    .
    1969
    Birth of Maurice Odumbe, the Kenyan captain when they pulled off one of the most stunning upsets in sporting history, a 73-run victory over West Indies in Poona in the 1995-96 World Cup. For good measure, Odumbe was Man of the Match: he returned the startling figures of 10-3-15-3, and chipped in with a run-out as well. He was instrumental in Kenya getting to the World Cup semi-finals in 2003, but the following year was slapped with a five-year ban for associating with a bookmaker.

    1995
    The start of an amazing County Championship match in Luton. Having made only 127 themselves, Essex demolished Northants for just 46, with Mark Ilott taking an all-lbw hat-trick. Northants had been 45 for 4 before losing six wickets for one run. Essex were then cleaned up for 107, with another England left-armer, Paul Taylor, taking 7 for 50, and Northants squeaked home by two wickets.

    1982
    Birth of yet another Bangladesh left-arm spinner. Abdur Razzak had trouble with a suspect action but still managed to become a regular in the one-day team. He made his one-day debut in 2004 and took his first five-for against Zimbabwe in 2006 - the year he made his Test debut. A year after playing the 2007 World Cup and World T20, Razzak was reported for a suspect action again and this time an independent analysis found that he bent his arm up to 28 degrees. The ICC cleared him a year later and he went on to feature in the next four World T20s.

    Other birthdays
    1874 George Rowe (South Africa)
    1924 Ebbu Ghazali (Pakistan)
    1935 Margaret Rutherford (England)
    1937 Prince Indrajitsinhji (India)
    1967 Denise Reid (South Africa)
    1977 Ahmed Kamal (Bangladesh)

    ? ESPN cricinfo

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    June 16 down the years

    Long Tom

    An elegant, strokeful fan favourite is born

    Tom Graveney scored 4882 runs in 79 Tests

    1927
    Birth of one of England's most elegant batsmen. Tom Graveney's gleaming strokeplay made him a favourite with fans - but a Goweresque propensity to throw his wicket away brought about a measure of mistrust in the England selectors. He was put out to pasture in 1963, but weight of runs for Worcestershire got him back in three years later, and he played 24 of his 79 Tests after his 39th birthday. He captained England for the only time in that period too, at Headingley in 1968. Graveney excelled against West Indies, averaging almost 59, including a mighty 258 at Trent Bridge in 1957. He also made 175 in only his second Test innings, against India in Bombay in 1951-52. Graveney played for and coached Queensland and later became a popular and cheery summariser for the BBC.

    1922
    One of the most amazing turnarounds the game has seen occurred on this day at Edgbaston, where Hampshire were bowled out for 15 and, 208 behind, followed on. Second time round they appeared down and out at 177 for 6, but with George Brown scoring 175 and the No. 10, Walter Livsey, 110, they rallied to make 521 and then bowled Warwickshire out for 158, winning by 155 runs. It was rumoured that Freddie Calthorpe, Warwickshire's captain, was asked by his committee to delay taking the new ball to extend the game into the second afternoon and so improve takings.

    1977
    The beginning of the Jubilee Test at Lord's - and of Mike Brearley's reign as England captain. Brearley replaced Tony Greig, who was sacked for his involvement in the setting up of World Series Cricket (but kept his place in the side). Greig showed why with a thumping 91 in the second innings, but a rain-affected match ended in a draw, with Australia struggling on 114 for 6. The gate receipts - over ?220,000 - were a record for any cricket match in Britain at the time.

    1999
    A World Cup semi-final at Old Trafford, and a fireworks display from Shoaib Akhtar, who inspired Pakistan to a comfortable nine-wicket victory over New Zealand. His figures of 3 for 55 weren't that spectacular, but the manner of his three wickets certainly was - they all came from searing yorkers. This was cricket at its sexiest. Wisden Cricket Monthly said that "Shoaib was [the tournament's] pin-up: exciting, effective, expensive, exhilarating."

    1932
    A world-record opening stand. Herbert Sutcliffe (313) and Percy Holmes (224 not out) put on no fewer than 555 for Yorkshire against Essex, although their record has since been broken. Sutcliffe threw his wicket away the moment they had passed the previous best, 554, only for the scoreboard then to clunk back down to 554. After a few minutes it was realised that a no-ball had been missed, and all was well. Except for Essex, who collapsed in each innings for 78 and 164 and were thrashed by an innings.

    1896
    Birth of Cotar Ramaswami, the Indian batsman who went missing from his home in Madras in 1985, never to return. No body has ever been found, and in the Wisden Almanack he is listed as "presumed dead". In his playing days, Ramaswami was the second-oldest Indian to make his Test debut, at 40 years 37 days, against England in 1936. He is also one of only two Test cricketers to have played tennis in the Davis Cup, for India in 1922.

    1906
    Birth of Alan Fairfax, the New South Wales allrounder who in ten Test appearances for Australia averaged 51 with the bat and 30 with the ball. He would have played more Tests had he not signed up for Accrington in the Lancashire League in 1932. With the bat he was strikingly consistent, and he was only out once in single figures. Fairfax died of a heart attack in London in 1955.

    1914
    A debut centurion is born. Billy Griffith played only three Tests for England, despite hitting 140 in his first innings, against West Indies in Trinidad in 1947-48. It was also his first first-class hundred - Griffith had gone on the tour as assistant manager, and it was a surprise that he played at all. His other Test scores were 4, 8, 5 and 0, though he kept well enough for Godfrey Evans to be left out of the team in two Tests in South Africa in 1948-49.

    1899
    At the age of 21, the great Victor Trumper made his first Test century in only his second Test match, a majestic 135 not out against England at Lord's. With Clem Hill also making 135, Australia eased home by ten wickets.

    1924
    An Edgbaston demolition job. Faced with an imposing England total of 438 in the first Test, South Africa collapsed for a dismal 30 all out, equalling their lowest Test total, with only extras (11) reaching double figures. England's captain, Arthur Gilligan, had the ridiculous figures of 6.3-4-7-6, and followed up with 5 for 83 in the second innings. South Africa at least salvaged some dignity in defeat, with Bob Catterall making 120 in their second-innings 390. Maurice Tate and Herbert Sutcliffe made their England debuts in this Test.

    2014
    The day Sri Lanka's last-wicket pair batted out the final five balls to cling on for a dramatic draw at Lord's. In scenes filled with nerve-jangling tension, umpire Paul Reiffel gave Nuwan Pradeep out lbw off the penultimate ball of the Test. But Sri Lanka used the decision review system to challenge the call and replays indicated an inside edge. Pradeep survived but there was more drama in store. Stuart Broad forced an outside edge off the final ball but it fell inches short of second slip and prompted gasps all around the stands. Sri Lanka had batted more than 90 overs in the fourth innings to salvage a draw on only three earlier occasions and only once away from home. Lord's now joined that list.

    1982
    Birth of an Australian opening batsman. Ed Cowan made a name for himself as a thoughtful cricketer and as someone who has sought opportunities beyond the mainstream (in 2010 he kept himself busy by playing club cricket in the Netherlands and one-day cricket for Scotland in the county competition). He made his Test debut in the 2011-12 Boxing Day Test against India, scored a half-century in the match and another in Perth later in the series. After a low-scoring tour of West Indies, Cowan started the 2012-12 Australian summer with his maiden Test hundred, against South Africa in Brisbane. But after a string of starts that weren't converted to big scores, Australia dropped him during the 2013 Ashes.

    Other birthdays
    1961 Robbie Kerr (Australia)
    1963 Mohsin Kamal (Pakistan)
    1969 Nehemiah Perry (West Indies)
    1982 Laura Spragg (England)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    June 17 down the years today
    The greatest one-day match
    The World Cup semi-final between Australia and South Africa

    The Allan Donald run-out: possibly one-day cricket's most iconic photograph


    1999
    The greatest one-day match in history, and arguably the greatest game of cricket anywhere. The 100 overs of the World Cup semi-final between Australia and South Africa at Edgbaston had just about everything. Everyone knows about the agonising end, when the match was tied and Australia went through to the final because of their superior run rate in the earlier Super Six stage, but there was so much more to the game than that heartbreaking finale. There was Michael Bevan and Steve Waugh coolly leading Australia's recovery with a patience reminiscent of the base-laying go-slow by Imran Khan and Javed Miandad in the 1992 World Cup final; a seam-bowling masterclass from Shaun Pollock and Allan Donald, who had combined figures of 9 for 68; the performance of a true champion from Shane Warne (4 for 29) after South Africa had raced to 48 for 0; a titanic all-round display from a barely fit Jacques Kallis; and some breathtaking hitting from Lance Klusener. But then, with two balls to spare and one run needed, Klusener set off on that fateful run, only to find that Donald had lead in his boots, and South Africa's dream died in the cruellest manner possible.


    1981
    Despite a brittle body and a score of injuries, Shane Watson, born today, stuck it out in international cricket long enough to make it as a successful one-day allrounder. At the crease, he was an aggressive brute with a broad chest, a right-handed disciple of Matthew Hayden, and someone who didn't need to follow through to gain a boundary. While he dazzled in ODIs and T20Is, his Test returns were less satisfying. In his first eight Tests as an opener, he scored seven fifties and a 120, but he struggled to maintain that consistency going forward. The low point came in 2013 in India, when he was axed along with three other players for failing to complete a task set by coach Mickey Arthur. He returned to the fold for the final Test in Delhi - captaining the side in Michael Clarke's absence - and then went on to crack two centuries and two fifties in the back-to-back Ashes series. After a challenging start to the 2015 World Cup, and an enthralling battle with Wahab Riaz, he finished 64 not out as Australia beat Pakistan in the quarter-final on their way to the title. He retired from international cricket in 2016 after the World T20.


    1930
    Brian Statham, born today, was the quintessential English seamer - a disciple of line and length, and the original if-they-miss-I'll-hit bowler (over 40% of his Test victims were bowled). He was also a true gentleman: unassuming, hugely popular, and happy to give the limelight to Frank Tyson or Fred Trueman. Statham played the good cop to Trueman's bad. Between them they were England's best new-ball partnership. Though he took 252 wickets at an average of less than 25, Statham's workhorse role meant that he only took one ten-for in his 70 Tests, against South Africa at Lord's in 1960. His first-class record (2260 wickets at 16.37), when he was the main man for Lancashire, was sensational. He died of leukaemia in June 2000.


    1930
    One of the more famous catches in English cricket history, by a man who played only one first-class match. Sydney Copley was on the Nottinghamshire ground staff when he had to field as a substitute in the first Test between England and Australia at Trent Bridge. And with Australia on 229 for 3, chasing 429, Copley took a superb catch at mid-on to end a dangerous partnership between Stan McCabe and Don Bradman. Bradman went on to make a fine 131, but England won by 93 runs.


    1969
    When rain stopped play with two hours remaining in the Championship match between Hampshire and Glamorgan in Bournemouth, the Hampshire players went home assuming that was that. But it wasn't. Glamorgan trooped back out when the rain stopped, stood around for two minutes, and were awarded the match by the umpires. MCC subsequently overturned the result on the grounds that there had been a misunderstanding.


    1964
    Birth of the Worcestershire wicketkeeper Steve Rhodes, who looked the part in his first season of Test cricket before fading from the scene. Against New Zealand and South Africa in 1994, he excelled with bat and gloves, most notably saving the Lord's Test against New Zealand. But a horror tour of Australia followed: he made only 72 runs in nine innings, his keeping went to pieces, and he was not picked again.


    1956
    Birth of left-arm spinner Nick Cook, who only made his debut, at Lord's in 1983, because Phil Edmonds ricked his back getting out of a car. Cook took 5 for 35 in his first innings, and four five-fors in his first four Tests. But after taking 32 wickets at an average of 17 in those four Tests, he was impotence personified: his last 11 Tests brought 20 wickets at an average of 57.


    2000
    A shock for England, as a West Indies side that was supposed to be in terminal decline pummelled them by an innings in the first Test, at Edgbaston. Courtney Walsh took eight wickets, in the process becoming the first man to pass 450 Test wickets, and Curtly Ambrose - despite bowling absolutely magnificently - ended with match figures of 34.5-18-48-1. All was well that ended well, though: England went on to win 3-1, their first series victory against West Indies for 31 years.


    2000
    On the same day, in Colombo, Pakistan grabbed a tense five-wicket victory over Sri Lanka. Their star was Wasim Akram, who took his 25th five-for and smacked 78 in the first innings, adding 90 for the last wicket with Arshad Khan. Wasim then saw Pakistan home after they wobbled to 89 for 5 in pursuit of 131 for victory.

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    June 18 down the years

    Crash bang walloped


    Underdogs Bangladesh storm Australia's party

    Mohammad Ashraful hit his maiden one-day ton in Bangladesh's perfectly timed chase




    2005
    "The most embarrassing defeat in our sport history" was how Sydney's Daily Telegraph summed up a performance that reverberated around the globe. Bangladesh had been 500 to 1 outsiders for their opening encounter with Australia in the NatWest Series, but having restricted a lacklustre opposition to 249 for 5, they set about scripting a miracle. Led by the diminutive Mohammad Ashraful, whose even 100 was his maiden one-day century, they paced their chase to perfection. With seven required from the final over, Aftab Ahmed walloped Jason Gillespie out towards the River Taff for a massive six. A scrambled single later, the great upset had been completed.


    1975
    One of the greatest bowling performances in one-day international history. The script couldn't have been better. The first World Cup, and an England-Australia semi-final in front of a raucous Yorkshire crowd. But on a pitch that was damp and green even by Headingley's standards, the fairy tale required England to win the toss. They didn't, and left-arm seamer Gary "Gus" Gilmour, in his first match of the tournament, moved the ball all over the shop, in the air and off the pitch. Even figures of 12-6-14-6 don't tell the full story: his wickets were all in the top seven - Amiss, Wood, Fletcher, Greig, Hayes and Knott - and left England for dead at 37 for 7. They limped to 93 - which might have been enough, but for Gilmour's run-a-ball 28, which rescued the Aussies from a fraught 39 for 6.


    1983
    Some unseemly violence amid the tranquil surroundings of the Nevill Ground at Tunbridge Wells, all from the bat of Kapil Dev. Kapil brutalised the Zimbabwean bowlers in an unforgettable display of hitting, as India recovered from 9 for 4, and then 17 for 5. Wickets continued to fall at the other end, but it didn't matter as Kapil creamed an amazing 175 not out off 138 balls, with 16 fours and six sixes. The next highest score was Syed Kirmani's 24 not out, and in all, Kapil's innings comprised 66% of India's total of 266 for 8. Before it, India's qualification for the semi-finals had been in doubt. Seven days later they were world champions, courtesy another sensational victory, over West Indies in the final.


    1985
    A glorious, hazy summer began with England beating Australia by five wickets in the first Test at Headingley. The star was Tim Robinson, who continued a storming start to his Test career with a stately 175, while Ian Botham put the boot in with a violent 51-ball 60. John Emburey chipped in with 5 for 82 in the second innings - it was his only five-for in 33 Tests in England. This match was only Robinson's sixth Test, and he ended it with an average of 71.11.


    1894
    Only 70 minutes' play was possible between Surrey and Essex at The Oval, but that was enough for Tom Richardson to exploit a wet wicket and take 10 for 45. He added another five in the second innings two days later.


    1971
    A grinder is born. Blair Pocock, the meticulous New Zealand opener, set the tone for his Test career when he made 34 off 118 balls and 28 off 96 on his debut, against Australia in Perth in 1993-94. Throughout his Test career he scored his runs at a rate of 29.8 per 100 balls - that's less than two an over. Pocock never managed a century in 15 Tests, although he did make six fifties in his last nine appearances.


    1915
    Birth of Arthur Fagg, the England opener whose career highlight was making two double-centuries in one match, for Kent against Essex in Colchester in 1938. Fagg later became a Test umpire. He died in Tunbridge Wells in 1977.


    1986
    A one-day rout. In an ICC Trophy match at the Cannock & Rugeley club, Papua New Guinea massacred Gibraltar by 369 runs. PNG stormed to 455 for 9 off 60 overs, before Gibraltar - whose team included future Woking FA Cup hero Tim Buzaglo - fell apart for 86.


    1914
    Birth of Billy Wade, the South African wicketkeeper who played 11 Tests either side of the Second World War. He was a very handy batsman - his first-class average was 48.45 - and he made a Test century against England in Port Elizabeth in 1948-49. Wade later became a Test umpire.


    1979
    The only game of the second World Cup that was won by an Associate nation - over three days, owing to a late start and the fact that the following day was a rest day. Sunil Wettimuny, Roy Dias and Duleep Mendis made half-centuries on a placid Old Trafford track to take Sri Lanka to 238. India started their chase on the Monday confidently, but after Gundappa Viswanath was run out for 22, they lost their last seven wickets for 59. Legspinner Somachandra De Silva and medium-pacer Tony Opatha took three each.


    1987
    South Africa fast bowler Kyle Abbott, born today, had a sensational beginning to his Test career, taking 7 for 29 against Pakistan in Centurion in 2013, the second-best figures by a South African on debut after Lance Klusener's 8 for 64. That domestic season, Abbott also emerged as the leading wicket-taker in the South African first-class competition. With his ability to swing the ball and bowl effectively at the death, he made a name for himself in South Africa's limited-overs squads, and he was one of their standout bowlers in their 2015 World Cup campaign, until his surprise exclusion from the team for the semi-final, which South Africa lost. In the 2016-17 season, Abbott made regular breakthroughs during a home ODI series against Australia in October and a Test series down under in November, but just as he was cementing his place in the side, he dropped a bombshell by announcing that he had signed a three-year Kolpak contract with Hampshire. He was dropped immediately and his international career appeared to be over.


    Other birthdays
    1966 Melissa Papworth (Australia)
    1974 Martin van Jaarsveld (South Africa)
    1977 Rowan Milburn (New Zealand)




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    Default june 19

    June 19 down the years
    An Olympian aloofness
    The great Wally Hammond is born


    Wally Hammond: over 50,000 first-class runs, and 700-plus first-class

    1903
    One of the greatest of all batsmen is born. Walter Hammond's career was notable for some frightening periods of run-scoring, most notably 251, 200, 32, 119 not out and 177 in Australia in 1928-29, and 227 and 336 not out in New Zealand in 1932-33. (Unsurprisingly, his average of 563 is a record for a series.) In all, he made back-to-back Test centuries no fewer than five times, and his record of seven double-hundreds is fourth only to Don Bradman, Brian Lara and Kumar Sangakkara. Hammond made over 50,000 first-class runs, and his medium-pacers were penetrative enough to bring 732 first-class wickets - and two Test five-fors. For good measure, he was one of the finest slip fielders in history, and played football for Bristol Rovers.

    1978
    The finest all-round performance of Sir Ian Botham's career. Not content with a first-innings century, Botham took 8 for 34 in the second innings as Pakistan were demolished by an innings in the second Test at Lord's. With the ball swinging all over the place, Botham was close to unplayable. Haroon Rashid was bowled through the gate by an inswinger that Botham rated as one of the best balls he bowled in his career. His figures remain the best in any Lord's Test. This was only Botham's seventh Test; his record after it was 445 runs at an average of 56, 36 wickets at 18, and a star was well and truly born.

    2002
    One of the most gobsmacking run-feasts in one-day cricket. Surrey and Glamorgan went at it hammer and tongs in their C&G Trophy encounter at The Oval, taking advantage of a short leg-side boundary to batter an eye-popping 867 runs between them. Ali Brown stole the headlines by pounding 268 from 160 balls in Surrey's monolithic total of 438 for 5 - both world records at the time. Robert Croft did his utmost to steal them back - his 119 from 69 balls launched the most improbable run-chase but they were to eventually fall nine adrift.

    1870
    The death of George Summers, a young Nottinghamshire professional, at the age of 23, following a blow received while batting at Lord's four days earlier. Summers was struck on the temple by a ball which reared off a length (Lord's was a notoriously bad surface at the time) and although he recovered enough to watch the match from the pavilion the next day, he died on his return to Nottingham. A post-mortem revealed that he had fractured his skull.

    1851
    Birth of a man who played Test cricket for both England and Australia. Billy Midwinter, a sound batsman and useful medium-pacer, was born in Gloucestershire, but after emigrating he made his Test debut against England, in the inaugural Test, in Melbourne in 1876-77. He played eight Tests for Australia, either side of his four appearances for England, which came in Australia in 1881-82. Midwinter was famously kidnapped by WG Grace in 1878, when he was due to play for Australia against Middlesex but was instead taken to play for Gloucestershire against Surrey at The Oval. He suffered mental problems after the death of his wife and two children, and died in an asylum in Melbourne in 1890.

    1980
    Throughout his career, Graham Gooch had an almost masochistic zeal for facing the West Indian pacemen, and on this day he played one of his best innings. It wasn't quite up there with his 154 not out at Headingley in 1991 but this 123 in the drawn second Test at Lord's was a cracker. Against Holding, Roberts, Garner and Croft, and in a match where no other Englishman reached 50, Gooch smacked 17 fours and a six in a rollicking 162-ball innings, with the runs coming out of a score of 165 while he was at the crease. It was also - finally - Gooch's first Test century, after 22 Tests that included a pair on debut and being run out for 99.

    1868
    Playing for Cambridge University against Surrey at The Oval, Charlie Absolom became the first man to be given out obstructing the field in first-class cricket.

    1867
    In 14 Tests for Australia, New South Welshman Frank Iredale, born today, scored 807 runs at 36.68. He racked up over 1000 runs in both his tours of England - in 1896 and 1899. From early in 1922 until his death he was secretary of the NSW Cricket Association, and he also did much journalistic work besides being the author of Thirty-three Years' Cricket.


    Other birthdays
    1912 **** Pollard (England)
    1934 Hammond Furlonge (West Indies)
    1959 Lennie Louw (Namibia)
    1974 Feiko Kloppenburg (Netherlands)

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    Default june 20

    June 20 down the years
    World Cup anti-climax

    The dampest of squibs on the biggest stage of all

    Australia won their second World Cup

    1999
    A World Cup final - and quite a letdown it was too. Pakistan were simply demolished by Australia, who hustled them out for 132 (extras top-scored, with 25) and smashed their way to an eight-wicket victory with a massive 29.5 overs to spare. It was quite simply a case of a great Australian team at the peak of their powers, and an enigmatic Pakistan side at their worst.

    1954
    In Cape Province, South Africa, Allan Lamb is born. Qualifying for England through his parents, he made his debut as soon as he was eligible, against India in 1982, ironically at the expense of several players, Graham Gooch and Geoff Boycott among them, who had been banned for three years for their part in the rebel tour to South Africa. Lamb played 79 Tests in all, in which time he seized countless initiatives and wound up umpteen bowlers with his impudent strokeplay and feisty attitude. Lamb probably set a Test record for expletives during his career. When the going got tough, Lambie got going, and six of his 14 Test centuries were against West Indies, including three in 1984 - a summer in which he added a fourth, against Sri Lanka - and two in the Caribbean in 1989-90. He was also a magnificent one-day batsman.

    1993
    As Mike Atherton turned for a third run in the second Test against Australia, he was 22 yards away from making his first century in a Lord's Test. Then it all went wrong. Atherton slipped on the green side-strip pitch, and with his feet stuck as he desperately tried to get up, he could only watch on all fours as Ian Healy whipped off the bails. England were following on after a first-innings deficit of 427 - Australia piled up 632, with centuries from their top three - and lost the match by an innings and 62 runs. In all, 13 men have been run out for 99 in Tests, but none in quite such agonising circumstances as Atherton. This was only his fourth Lord's Test - he played 11 more but never did get his name on the famous honours board.

    1958
    A better day for England, as they dismissed New Zealand for what was then the lowest total in a Lord's Test - a paltry 47. Jim Laker and Tony Lock shared nine wickets on a spiteful, rain-affected pitch, and the following day the Kiwis were skittled for 77 to complete an innings defeat. In all, the match lasted less than 12 hours.

    1994
    Another England-New Zealand Lord's Test, and a nervy denouement. England scrambled to a draw with only two wickets left, thanks to Alec Stewart, who made 119 in the second innings, and Steve Rhodes, who made 32 and 24, both not out, and batted for nearly six hours in the match. New Zealand's star was Dion Nash, who became the first man to score a fifty and take ten wickets in a Lord's Test. His side should have won, but some execrable declaration batting on the fourth day - they plodded along to 211 for 5 off 68 overs - ultimately cost them, along with bad light, which prevented Nash bowling at the tailenders at the death.

    1939
    Birth of one of India's quickest bowlers. Ramakant "Tiny" Desai - he was only 5ft 4ins tall, hence the nickname - took the Ranji Trophy by storm in his first season, with 50 wickets at an average of 11 in 1958-59. He made his Test debut that year too, against West Indies in Delhi, when he was the only bowler to emerge with any credit as West Indies hammered over 600. Desai was a bit of a one-man band in England the following summer, and reduced England to 80 for 6 at Lord's, a day short of his 20th birthday. He ended up with 74 Test wickets, and later became chairman of selectors. He died in a Mumbai hospital in 1998.

    1979
    World Cup semi-final day, and England booked a place in the final for the first time with a thrilling nine-run victory over New Zealand at Old Trafford. England's most economical overs came from, of all people, Geoff Boycott (9-1-24-1) and Graham Gooch (3-1-8-0). Gooch also biffed three sixes in his 84-ball 71, an innings that made him Man of the Match. On the same day, West Indies overwhelmed Pakistan by 43 runs at The Oval - but their passage to the final was not without one or two scares. Chasing 294, Pakistan were in pole position at 176 for 1 with 20 overs remaining and Majid Khan and Zaheer Abbas going like a train, but Colin Croft turned the tide with a blistering 12-ball spell in which he blew away Majid, Zaheer and Javed Miandad. Viv Richards then nailed a high-class trio of his own: Asif Iqbal, Mudassar Nazar and Imran Khan.

    1981
    Birth of Pakistan opener Taufeeq Umar, who scored a century on Test debut against Bangladesh, and then impressed with half-centuries against Australia and West Indies, and a hundred in Cape Town in an innings in which the rest of the team contributed 117. But he then entered a prolonged run of poor form, which included disappointing home and away series against India, and with Pakistan chopping and changing their openers frequently, his appearances became less frequent. Returning to the national team in 2010-11, after a four-year absence, Umar struck a richer vein. He hit a match-winning hundred in St Kitts in May 2011 and a career-best 236 against Sri Lanka in Abu Dhabi that October. Injury ended his solid run in mid-2012 and he played just one more Test thereafter.

    1997
    St Vincent became Test cricket's 78th venue - and Sri Lanka celebrated by reducing West Indies to 5 for 3 on the first morning. The destroyers were the less-than-threatening Ravi Pushpakumara and Sajeewa de Silva, but a Brian Lara century in the second innings gave West Indies the draw they needed to clinch a 1-0 series victory.

    Other birthdays
    1856 George Vernon (England)
    1860 Jack Worrall (Australia)
    1897 Cyril Francois (South Africa)
    1909 Robert Marley (West Indies)
    1949 Arani Jayaprakash (India)
    1968 Aijaz Ali (USA)
    1970 Maia Lewis (New Zealand)
    1972 Paras Mhambrey (India)
    1984 Waddington Mwayenga (Zimbabwe)

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    Exclamation June 21

    June 21 down the years
    Caribbean power at Lord's
    West Indies take the first World Cup
    Clive Lloyd scored 102 off 85 balls in the final

    1975
    The first World Cup final, and a Caribbean coronation. West Indies were always in control against Australia once their captain, Clive Lloyd, belted 102 off only 85 balls. Chasing 291, Australia's work was undone by a succession of run-outs. Three came from brilliant work by Viv Richards in the covers alone, including both Chappells. At 233 for 9 it was as good as over, but Dennis Lillee and Jeff Thomson jangled one or two nerves, until the fifth and final run-out finished things late on the longest day of the year. The winning margin was 17 runs, 13 of which came from Thomson no-balls. The game, which started at 10.30am, finished at 8.43pm.

    1937
    One of England's most resilient openers is born. John Edrich's unswerving concentration and fierce self-restraint made him the perfect old-fashioned opener, whose purpose was to see off the new ball and lay a base for the team. Then he would play his strokes. In only his ninth Test, he cracked 310 not out against New Zealand at Headingley, which included a staggering 52 fours and five sixes. Edrich was only the third left-hander (after Phil Mead and Frank Woolley) to score 100 first-class hundreds. His cousin Bill played 39 Tests for England.

    1981
    One of the most famous summers in English cricket history began ignominiously, with Australia winning a first-Test dogfight by four wickets at Trent Bridge. The key moment came when Paul Downton dropped an absolute sitter off Allan Border. Australia also unleashed a secret weapon in their debutant Terry Alderman, who took nine wickets and ended up with 42 in the six-match series. As for Downton, he was dropped and didn't play again for three years.

    2009
    Three months after the horrific attack on the Sri Lankan cricketers in Lahore, the two teams met at the final of the World T20 at at Lord's. It was Pakistan's second appearance in the final, and this time they made good of it. Mohammad Amir dismantled Sri Lanka's main weapon, Tillakaratne Dilshan, for a duck in the first over, and Abdul Razzaq, returning from the ICL, picked out Sanath Jayasuriya for 17. Shahid Afridi led the 139-run chase with a masterful unbeaten 54.

    2015
    A come-from-behind win for Pakistan in Galle, their first Test win in Sri Lanka in nine years. In response to Sri Lanka's first-innings 300, Pakistan were at a wobbly 96 for 5 before Asad Shafiq and Sarfraz Ahmed fought back to give them a lead of 117. Legspinner Yasir Shah then brought the hosts down on the fifth day with 7 for 76, leaving Pakistan needing only 90 for victory. This after the first day was lost completely to rain.

    2015
    Bangladesh notched up their first bilateral series win against India, fresh off a similar ODI series win against Pakistan at home. The hosts were hardly made to sweat in the second ODI, in Mirpur, as they kept India to a modest 200 in a rain-curtailed game. Rookie left-arm seamer Mustafizur Rahman followed up his five-for in the first ODI with 6 for 43 here, before the batsmen knocked off the runs with six wickets to spare. The comprehensive nature of both victories *- and against a full-strength India at that - *made the achievement memorable. It was also Bangladesh's tenth straight win at home.


    1952
    Birth of the New Zealand captain Jeremy Coney, who fit more into 15 Tests as captain than most people would in 50. In 1985-86 he led the Kiwis to their first series victory over Australia, and later that winter they became the first side to beat Australia in two series in the same season. In 1986, New Zealand then won their first series in England, and the following winter, in Coney's last series, they held a rampant West Indies side to a 1-1 draw. As a batsman, Coney was technically correct, although it took him 25 Tests to get a century. Then he saved the Wellington Test against England in 1983-84 with an eight-hour 174 not out. He went on to make three Test hundreds, all of them unbeaten.

    1997
    England's lowest 20th-century score at Lord's. It didn't take Australia long to recover from being mauled in the first Test at Edgbaston - all of 42.3 overs, in fact, as Glenn McGrath routed England for 77 with 8 for 38 on a juicy wicket. But the rain that had brought about such a merciless interrogation from McGrath ultimately saved England. Only 104 overs were possible on the first four days, and England comfortably batted out the last.

    1998
    Another year, another Lord's humiliation for England, who were thrashed by South Africa by ten wickets. The catalyst was Allan Donald, who bulldozed them in the first innings with 5 for 32, when extras (20) was the top scorer. If anything, England were even worse second time round. Nasser Hussain had dragged England to 222 for 3, but in the blink of an eye they were 233 for 9. In a decade notable for spectacular England collapses, this one was right up there.

    1993
    Another Lord's defeat. England were battered by an innings and 62 runs, having taken only four Australian wickets in the whole match. The lowlight was Chris Lewis' pathetic dance down the track at Tim May just before lunch on this the final day, when England were batting to save the game. He was stumped to complete a pair. This was England's seventh Test defeat in a row, and a nadir in a period that was full of them.

    1992
    Yet another Lord's defeat. But at least England came out of this one with honour, after a classic Sunday's play on which 17 wickets fell. Chasing 138 to win, Pakistan collapsed to 95 for 8 against Chris Lewis and Ian Salisbury, only for Wasim Akram and Waqar Younis to drive them over the winning line as a three-man England attack (Phil DeFreitas and Ian Botham were injured) tired at the death. It was also the end of the line for Botham and Allan Lamb. This was their last Test appearance.

    1988
    And still another Lord's defeat. In this one, West Indies had been 54 for 5 on the first morning, but Gus Logie and Jeff Dujon drove England to distraction with a typically bold counterattack, and then Malcolm Marshall (6 for 32) secured a first-innings lead with a fast-bowling masterclass. England were eventually left to chase 442. Miracles do happen in cricket - but not against Marshall, Patterson, Ambrose and Walsh, and despite Allan Lamb's defiant 113 (not to mention a last-wicket partnership of 53 between Graham Dilley and Paul Jarvis), West Indies eased home.

    1974
    Some cheer for England at last. In the second Test, England flayed India in scoring 629, their highest total at Lord's until another Indian side was on the receiving end 16 years later. Dennis Amiss cracked 188 and there were also hundreds for Mike Denness (118) and Tony Greig (106), plus 96 from John Edrich. It could have been worse - England lost their last six wickets for 58. Bishan Bedi ended up with figures of 64.2-8-226-6 - the first double-century by a bowler in a Lord's Test.

    1991
    Birth of a West Indian power-hitter. In 2010, Deandra Dottin became the first woman to score an international T20 hundred, when she smashed an unbeaten 112 against South Africa in the World T20. She reached her century off just 38 balls. Dottin made her international debut in 2008, and performed reasonably well in the 2009 50-over World Cup. Three months later, in the first World T20 to feature women, she made another one, against the same opposition. Dottin narrowly missed out on a one-day hundred when she was dismissed for 95 against Pakistan in 2011. In 2013, Dottin's all-round contributions played a pivotal role in West Indies' run to the final of the Women's World Cup. Three years later, she was instrumental in West Indies' triumph in the Women's World T20 in India.

    1901
    Nottinghamshire were bowled out for 13 by Yorkshire in under an hour at Trent Bridge on a rain-affected wicket. Wilfred Rhodes did most of the damage with 6 for 4.

    1972
    Netherlands keeper Jeroen Smits, born today, played 38 ODIs and also captained the side. He was one of the most dependable members of the 2003 and 2007 World Cup side and led Netherlands in their memorable win over England in the 2009 World T20. He retired from international cricket later that year to give younger players a chance.

    Other birthdays
    1922 Jim McConnon (England)
    1929 Agha Saadat Ali (Pakistan)
    1938 Jackie Botten (South Africa)
    1949 Denis Streak (Zimbabwe)
    1955 Helen Stother (England)
    1966 Nasir Javed (USA)
    1979 Steve Massiah (USA)

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    Default June 22

    June 22 down the years
    Behind the eight-ball
    Bob Massie has an impressive debut
    Bob Massie, cheered by his team-mates, took 16 for 137 on debut

    1972
    The beginning of Massie's match. When the Lord's Test between England and Australia began, Bob Massie was just another nervous debutant - and one who had been rejected by Northants after a trial two years previously. Four days later he achieved cricketing immortality. Swinging the ball fiendishly in helpful conditions, Massie took 8 for 84 and 8 for 53, the best figures by a debutant until Narendra Hirwani destroyed West Indies in 1987-88. England simply had no answer. Massie's figures were almost as impressive as his enormous sideburns. He was the talk of the town for the next few weeks, but he only played five more Tests. And within 18 months of his Test debut he was dropped by his state side, Western Australia.

    1946
    The start of England's first post-war Test, and an unforgettable debut for Alec Bedser. He had to wait until he was 27 to play Test cricket but soon made up for lost time with 7 for 49 in his first innings, and 11 wickets in all, as England hammered India inside two and a half days at Lord's. Bedser was the king of seven-fors: he took another in his second Test, and five in all during his Test career.

    1996
    Almost five years after making his one-day debut, Sourav Ganguly stroked a sumptuous 131 on his Test debut, for India against England at Lord's. Earlier in the match Jack Russell, a less aesthetically appealing left-hander, made his second Test hundred - and the first by an England wicketkeeper at Lord's for 44 years. Three Tests later he was dropped. Russell also caught Rahul Dravid for 95, thus preventing the first instance of two debutants making a century in the same Test. This drawn match is best remembered as the 66th and last of ****ie Bird's career. As he entered the field the players formed a guard of honour, but Bird wiped away the tears to trigger Mike Atherton lbw for 0 to the fifth ball of the match. It was all deliciously ironic: Bird was usually a notorious not-outer when it came to lbws.

    1965
    England clinched a seven-wicket win over New Zealand at Lord's with only 15 minutes to spare. But the match is best remembered as the last of Fred Trueman's 67-Test career. He finished with 2 for 40 and 0 for 69, and took his wickets total to 307, a world record for just over ten years until West Indies' Lance Gibbs usurped him.

    1983
    World Cup semi-final day, and a nasty surprise for England at Old Trafford, where India beat them by six wickets. England were restricted to 213 on a poor pitch - nobody topped Graeme Fowler's 33 - and India cantered home with five overs to spare. Sandeep Patil, with what Wisden Cricket Monthly described as "a cascade of volatile drives", was the match-winner; he completed a 32-ball fifty with the winning hit.

    1983
    In the other semi-final, Clive Lloyd won the toss - and West Indies the match. The two events weren't entirely unrelated. Pakistan wobbled to 184 for 8 on a typically bouncy Oval surface, and West Indies eased home by eight wickets with 11 overs to spare.

    1984
    Jerome Taylor, born today, is better known for bowling West Indies to a famous Test win, taking 5 for 11 to bundle England out for 51 in Kingston in 2009. He made his Test debut in 2003 on the back of some impressive domestic performances, but after three wickets in his first three Tests, he got his next chance only in 2006. He didn't let that one slip, doing especially well against India - getting the ball to lift in the final Test in Kingston, where he got his maiden five-for (and nine in the match). He also took 4 for 49 against Australia in a Champions Trophy match in 2006 and a five-for against Zimbabwe in an ODI the next year. His international career was then disrupted with a spate of injuries when he was at his peak. He was in the wilderness for nearly four years before his comeback in 2014 against New Zealand. The following year, he took 11 wickets in two Tests against England.

    1948
    A Dutch opener is born - in Barbados. Nolan Clarke hammered 159 for Barbados against Mike Denness' England tourists in 1973-74 with what the Wisden Almanack described as "such power and confidence that might have been devastating international attacks for years". Twenty-two years later, at the age of 47, Clarke finally got to play international cricket, for Netherlands in the 1995-96 World Cup, although he only got 50 runs in five innings. He'd done more than most to get them there, having scored 121 not out against Bermuda in the ICC Trophy playoff that clinched their place.

    1991
    Match-saving heroics from Robin Smith at Lord's. Smith pounded 148 not out against West Indies, after England had been in real trouble at 84 for 5, still 335 behind West Indies in the first innings. This was Smith's zenith: his average roared back over 50, and he ended the series with a record of 27 Tests, 2051 runs, and an average of 52.58. A year later he entered the dark alley of legspin, when Mushtaq Ahmed, and then Shane Warne, made fatal dents into his confidence. Also in this match, Derek Pringle took his third and final Test five-for. Believe it or not, they were all against West Indies.

    1855
    Birth of the first black man to play for Australia. Sam Morris, who was born in Hobart of West Indian parents, was a decent allrounder who played one Test, in Melbourne in 1884-85. He died in Victoria in 1931.
    Other birthdays

    1910 Elsie Deane (Australia)
    1923 Jimmy Cameron (West Indies)
    1935 Vaman Kumar (India)
    1947 Murray Webb (New Zealand)
    1958 Sudha Shah (India)
    1966 Meyrick Pringle (South Africa)
    1979 Peter McGlashan (New Zealand)
    1980 Kavita Roy (India)
    1981 Alex Gidman (England)

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    Default

    June 23 down the years
    The man who retrieved the Ashes

    The great Len Hutton is born
    Len Hutton scored 6971 runs in 79 Tests

    1916
    In Pudsey, one of England's greatest batsmen is born. Len Hutton will always be remembered for his 364 against Australia at The Oval in 1938 - the highest score in Ashes Tests, and the highest in any Test at the time. He was a stylish, technically impeccable opener who could switch easily between attack and defence as the situation demanded. He established himself after a poor start - 0 and 1 on debut - and played arguably his finest innings at Lord's in 1953, a flashing 145 against Australia. That summer Hutton led England to regain the Ashes, in a coronation year as well, and he was the first professional to be regularly appointed England captain. In 1956 he became only the third cricketer (after Jack Hobbs and Don Bradman) to be knighted for services to the game as a player. In the first innings of a Test he averaged a mighty 65, with 17 of his 19 centuries. Hutton injured his left arm badly during the Second World War, spending eight months in hospital and emerging with one arm two inches shorter than the other. He later became an England selector. He died in Kingston-upon-Thames in 1990.

    1979
    A World Cup final at Lord's - and an unforgettable toe-crushing interrogation from Joel Garner. West Indies retained their crown with a 92-run victory over England - Garner wrapping things up in blistering style with a spell of 5 for 4 in 11 balls. Four were bowled, three yorked, and four of them also bagged ducks. Geoff Boycott and Mike Brearley had laid a platform with an opening partnership of 129, but they did so too slowly, and England crumbled from 183 for 2 to 194 all out. Earlier Viv Richards had lashed a regal 138 and Collis King had had his moment in the sun with a thumping 66-ball 86


    2013
    A thrilling end to a damp day at Edgbaston as India held their nerve to overcome England in the final of the last edition of the Champions Trophy. In a match reduced to 20 overs, India were kept down to 129 thanks to Ravi Bopara's 3 for 20 with his dibbly-dobbly medium pace. Bopara was in fine nick with the bat too and took England to a point when they needed 28 off the last three overs. But Ishant Sharma, Ravindra Jadeja, and R Ashwin turned the tables at the death. Leading them was the ice-cool MS Dhoni, who became the first captain to win all ICC trophies.

    1957
    Zimbabwe's first captain is born. Dave Houghton was also their first centurion, after making a painstaking 121 against India in Zimbabwe's inaugural Test, in Harare in 1992-93. Then his approach was dictated by the weight of the occasion, but ordinarily he was an attacking batsman of real quality. Against Sri Lanka in Bulawayo two years later, he smashed a massive 266, but his most famous innings came before Zimbabwe were granted Test status. In the 1987 World Cup, Houghton made a glorious 142 against New Zealand in Hyderabad - only one other Zimbabwean scored more than 12 - and led his side from 104 for 7 to within three runs of New Zealand's 242 for 7. He later became national coach and a TV commentator.

    1947
    A massive partnership at Lord's, as Bill Edrich and Denis Compton, in the middle of their greatest year, punished a modest South Africa attack. The pair added 370, with Edrich cracking 189 and Compton 208. At the time it was the highest partnership for the third wicket in a Test. It remains England's highest for the third wicket, and is the highest for any wicket in a Lord's Test.

    1980
    Ramnaresh Sarwan's maturity and the serenity of his strokeplay were in evidence since his debut at 19, when he made a cool, classy 84 not out against Pakistan. It took Sarwan, who was born on this day, 49 innings to post his maiden Test century, and that was against Bangladesh, who were also at the receiving end when he made a double-century in 2004. Following Brian Lara's retirement after the World Cup in 2007, Sarwan was appointed captain for the tour of England, but a shoulder injury ruled him out and he lost the captaincy to Chris Gayle. The dip in form didn't come immediately - he made 291 against England in Barbados in 2009 - but he didn't play any Tests in 2010 and was excluded from the contracts list. He played the 2011 World Cup but was dropped again because of what the selectors said was a "focus on youth".

    1928
    The beginning of West Indies' life as a Test-playing nation. England crushed them by an innings, with Ernest Tyldesley hammering 122 in his only Test innings at Lord's. But they proved to be quick learners. In their sixth Test, the following winter, they recorded their first win.

    2003
    The first T20 hundred was scored on this day. In the first season of England's Twenty20 Cup, Ian Harvey smashed an unbeaten 100 off 50 balls for Gloucestershire as they chased Warwickshire's 134 in just 13.1 overs at Edgbaston. Seventy-six of Harvey's runs came off boundaries (in 17 balls). In 2004, Harvey moved to Yorkshire and scored hundreds for them in that season and the next.

    1932
    Nineteen Tests for Bob Blair, the Wellington fast bowler who was born today, but he played in a poor New Zealand side. They lost 13 and won none of those 19 Tests, and Blair failed to take a five-for. As a lower-order batsman he was extremely erratic. He bagged three pairs, reached double figures in only two of his 34 Test innings, but managed to slap 64 not out against England in Wellington in 1962-63. Blair also famously held up an end against South Africa in Johannesburg in 1953-54, just after hearing that his fianc?e had been killed in a train crash.

    1982
    Though he made his debut in 2003, Carlton Baugh really got his break in 2010 after the West Indian selectors gave up on Denesh Ramdin. Baugh does not meet modern-day cricket's requirement of wicketkeeper-batsman, but he did well to get a half-century in Colombo in 2010 and another against India at home a few months later.

    1904
    Birth of Quintin McMillan, the South African legspinner who played 13 Tests between 1929 and 1932. After 20 wickets in 11 Tests he took 16 in his last two, including two five-fors as South Africa beat New Zealand in Christchurch and Wellington. McMillan then retired to pursue a business career. He was only 44 when he died in his native Transvaal in 1948.

    1986
    Birth of Sri Lanka fast bowler Shaminda Eranga, who made his international debut in 2011, in the home series against Australia. His ODI and Test debuts were both spectacular: he needed only two balls to strike in his first ODI, and in his first Test he went one better, taking a wicket with his first ball (becoming only the second Sri Lanka bowler to achieve the feat). He took 11 wickets in two Tests during the 2014 tour of England, including the one that secured a thrilling series win for Sri Lanka in the last minute of play at Headingley. Two years later, Eranga took only five wickets from three Tests in England, and was suspended from bowling in international cricket after his action was found to be suspect.


    Other birthdays
    1849 Edmund Tylecote (England)
    1890 Tich Richmond (England)
    1925 Trevor Barber (New Zealand)
    1940 Mike Shrimpton (New Zealand)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.
    Last edited by UpdateA1; 27-06-2017 at 12:38 AM.

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    Default june 24

    June 24 down the years
    Sri Lanka's Headingley high
    A historic series win with a ball to spare
    In the nick of time: Sri Lanka celebrate a thrilling win at Headingley

    2014
    The day Sri Lanka won a Test, and a series, with a ball to spare. With the penultimate ball of a gripping final day at Headingley, Shaminda Eranga dismissed James Anderson to give Sri Lanka their first series victory in England (in a series of more than a Test). England seemed to have the match in control on the second day but a collapse of 8 for 87, followed by a century from Sri Lanka captain Angelo Mathews and an inspired spell from seamer Dhammika Prasad left them tottering at 57 for 5, chasing 350. England were able to prolong the match thanks mainly to Moeen Ali's defiant maiden Test century, but Sri Lankan prevailed in the end. The win also meant Sri Lanka finished with a clean sweep on the tour, after victories in the T20 and one-day series.

    1986
    At Trent Bridge in 2015, Stuart Broad, born today, set up an unforgettable Ashes win by taking 8 for 15 in 9.3 new-ball overs, the best figures for an England bowler against Australia after Jim Laker's 1956 heroics at Old Trafford. During that spell, Broad became the fifth England bowler to take 300 Test wickets. Four years earlier, he had taken a hat-trick at Trent Bridge, his home ground, in a match haul of 8 for 76 against India. In 2012 he got on the Lord's honours board with 11 against West Indies,and he took 11 more against Australia in Chester-le-Street a year later, this time ensuring the Ashes were won with a fierce spell after tea on day four, when he took six of the nine Australian wickets to fall. On England's 2015-16 tour of South Africa, Broad took 18 wickets, including 6 for 17 to bowl out South Africa for 83 in Johannesburg. Meanwhile, his batting has been good enough to render England's tail particularly bothersome for opposition bowlers; he made his maiden Test hundred at Lord's against Pakistan in 2010.


    1974
    India's lowest score - and the lowest total at Lord's. Following on 327 runs behind England in the second Test, India were blown away for just 42 in 17 overs on an overcast Monday morning. Geoff Arnold grabbed 4 for 19 and Chris Old 5 for 21. Arnold was only called into the side at the 11th hour, when Bob Willis withdrew with a back injury. Eknath Solkar, who made 18, was the only Indian batsman to reach double figures.

    1912
    Brian Johnston, who was born today, worked on BBC TV's Test-match team from 1946 to 1970, but he will always be remembered for being the voice of Test Match Special on the radio. Johnston's juvenile warmth, and love of double entendres and practical jokes, often overshadowed his brilliant spontaneity and total professionalism as a broadcaster.

    1941
    Among Australian seamers, only five have taken more Test wickets than the lanky Western Australian Graham "Garth" McKenzie, who was born today. He took 246 in all, and from the moment he played a match-winning hand on his debut, at Lord's in 1961 - with second-innings figures of 29-13-37-5 on his 20th birthday - he was a regular in the side. The gentlest of giants, and effortless and stylish in his action, McKenzie was superb on benign pitches (in India and Pakistan he took 42 wickets at an average of 19), and he was also a significant match-winner: when Australia won, he had 112 wickets at 19; in losses he took just 35 wickets at 57. He later married a South African and settled in Johannesburg.

    1960
    The only Lord's Test hat-trick. In his second Test, South Africa's Geoff Griffin dismissed MJK Smith, Peter Walker and Fred Trueman with consecutive deliveries - but this was also the day he bowled his last ball in Tests. Griffin was no-balled for throwing 11 times, having previously been called 17 times in a tour match. He played no further Tests and did not bowl again on the tour.

    1968
    Another Lord's demolition. Australia were bowled out for just 78, their lowest score at Lord's in the 20th century. Their destroyers were not, as might have been expected, John Snow and Derek Underwood, but David Brown (5 for 42) and Barry Knight (3 for 16). Rain saved the Aussies, but Underwood had some fun in the second innings, with a spell of 18-15-8-2.

    1938
    The first televised Test match, between England and Australia at Lord's. The Cricketer reported that "the enthusiasm was tremendous and the famous ground looked its best in the warmth and sunshine, and the giant fire escape at the East corner beyond the Mound brought the wizardry of Television very palpably before everyone's eyes". The teams played out a high-scoring draw in what was the second of a five-match series, with Wally Hammond striking 240 to lift England to 494 in the first innings. England headed into the final match at The Oval 1-0 down, but pulled off victory to draw the series.

    1985
    Birth of the bowler who became the second fastest to 50 Test wickets (from just seven matches). Vernon Philander made his debut in the famous Cape Town Test in 2011, in which South Africa were bowled out for 96 and Australia for 47 - Philander taking 5 for 15. He got ten against Sri Lanka in his third Test and picked up his next five-for two Tests later. With six five-fors in his first seven Tests, he reached 50 wickets only 139 days from his debut. He continued to be solid through 2012, including a five-for against England at Lord's to help South Africa snatch the No. 1 ranking off them, but had an inevitable drop from his stratospheric early heights in 2013, with match hauls of nine wickets against Pakistan in Cape Town and seven against India in Johannesburg his only highlights that year. Two years later, he was back to somewhere near his best, with 12 wickets in the memorable series win in Australia, followed by 17 in three Tests against Sri Lanka at home.

    1989
    A glorious day for Australia at Lord's. They began the third day of the second Test on 276 for 6, ten runs behind England, but the ominous figure of Steve Waugh was still at the crease. He added 66 with Merv Hughes, 50 with Trevor Hohns, and most gallingly of all, 130 with Geoff Lawson, who thumped 74 off only 94 balls. Waugh ended up on 152, taking his series tally to 329 runs without being dismissed, and England trailed by 242. By the close they were 58 for 3 and it was as good as over, even though David Gower (106) and Robin Smith - who was bowled by Terry Alderman four short of his first Test hundred - did salvage some pride.

    2000
    Pakistan pummelled Sri Lanka by an innings and 163 runs in the second Test, in Galle. Four of their batsmen - Saeed Anwar, Inzamam-ul-Haq, Younis Khan and Wasim Akram - made centuries, Wasim's off only 88 balls, and Abdul Razzaq became the youngest man to take a Test hat-trick. He was just 20 years 201 days old.

    Other birthdays
    1948 Dave Orchard (Australia)
    1982 Brenton Parchment (West Indies)
    1967 Darren Bicknell (England)
    1972 Birgit Viguurs (Netherlands)
    1974 Avril Fahey (Australia)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.
    Last edited by UpdateA1; 27-06-2017 at 12:40 AM.

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    Exclamation June 25

    June 25 down the years
    India's World Cup triumph
    Kapil's boys pull off one of the greatest upsets ever

    1983
    A memorable day for Indian cricket, and a nasty surprise for West Indies. Most people thought West Indies just had to turn up to win the World Cup final at Lord's, an opinion that was reinforced when India struggled to 183 all out. West Indies then motored to 50 for 1, with Viv Richards scything seven fours in a 28-ball 33, but the match turned when he hoicked Madan Lal high in the air and was superbly caught by Kapil Dev. The drama of 57 for 3 soon turned into a crisis at 76 for 6, as India's medium-pacers wobbled West Indies to death, and the cricket world slowly realised that a monstrous shock was on the cards. The Man of the Match was Mohinder Amarnath, for his 26 and 3 for 12. The highest score in the whole match was Kris Srikkanth's 38.

    1932
    Fifty-one years earlier, India's international odyssey started with their inaugural Test. They reduced England to 19 for 3 on the first morning before Douglas Jardine rescued them - twice - and that, plus a series of injuries as well as a lack of experience, meant India slid to a 158-run defeat. But their gutsy performance won great acclaim

    1963
    The end of an astonishing Lord's Test between England and West Indies. When the last ball was bowled, all four results were possible. England needed six to win with their final pair, David Allen and Colin Cowdrey - broken arm and all - at the crease. Allen blocked the final ball from Wes Hall, and Cowdrey, who intended to bat left-handed to protect his arm, did not have to face a ball. It had been a sensational match, the momentum of which swung time and time again.

    1934
    Australia's only defeat in a Lord's Test in the 20th century. Their remarkable record - 11 wins, 13 draws and one defeat - was tarnished when Hedley Verity spun them to an innings defeat almost single-handed. Verity took 7 for 61 and 8 for 43. On this, the third and final day, he took 14 wickets for 80 runs, including six in the final hour. At one point Australia crumbled from 94 for 3 to 95 for 8. Not entirely surprisingly, this is remembered as "Verity's Match".

    1955
    Birth of Vic Marks, the England offspinner turned broadsheet correspondent. Marks played six Tests and 34 one-day internationals, and is one of only five England bowlers to take two five-fors in one-day internationals (Darren Gough, Mark Ealham, Andrew Flintoff and James Anderson are the others). Marks is also the only Englishman to take a five-for in a World Cup match, against Sri Lanka in 1983 on his home ground at Taunton. He struggled for penetration at Test level with the ball, although he made fifties in his last three innings, in Pakistan in 1983-84. He is now cricket correspondent of the Observer, and a regular on Test Match Special.

    1953
    Birth of Ian Davis, the Australian opener who played 15 Tests in the 1970s. He was only 20 when he made his debut, against New Zealand in Melbourne in 1973-74, but never really lived up to the billing. He made one Test century, against Pakistan in Adelaide in 1976-77, and a classy 68 in the second innings of the Centenary Test the same winter.

    1971
    Kenya's best batsman is born. The classy Steve Tikolo played for Border in South Africa, and had a first-class average of nearly 50. He top-scored in Kenya's sensational win over West Indies in the 1996 World Cup, and in the same tournament slammed 96 against Sri Lanka, and 71 against England in the 1999 World Cup. Two years previously he'd made a glorious 147 against Bangladesh in the ICC Trophy final. He took over the captaincy of the national side in 2002 but quit two years later after being at the heart of a players' strike that helped lead to the ousting of the board, following which he returned as captain. Tikolo led Kenya to the semi-final of the 2003 World Cup and played in the next two, retiring at the end of the disappointing 2011 campaign before making a comeback at 42 for the World T20 qualifiers in 2013, and then moving on to coaching the team.

    Other birthdays
    1905 Ian Cromb (New Zealand)
    1923 Jack Hill (Australia)
    1934 Willie Rodriguez (West Indies)
    1946 Margaret Wilson (Australia)
    1949 Lalith Kaluperuma (Sri Lanka)
    1964 Phil Emery (Australia)
    1967 Roshan Jurangpathy (Sri Lanka)
    1969 Tunde Juhasz (Australia)
    1971 Jason Gallian (England)
    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    Post June 26

    June 26 down the years
    Gus arrive
    The birth of Aussie allrounder Gary Gilmour


    1951
    Birth of the Australian allrounder Gary Gilmour, who fit more into five one-day internationals than most people do into 200. He bowled England to defeat with 6 for 14 at Headingley in the World Cup semi-final of 1975, and then took 5 for 48 in the final. Amazingly he only played a solitary one-dayer after that. Gilmour also played 15 Tests, and ended with an outstanding strike rate of a wicket every 49 balls. His Test-best figures also came at Headingley, and also in 1975: 6 for 85 in the third Test against England. He died at 62, having battled health problems since a liver transplant in 2005.

    1995
    In the 1990s, it would have flattered the majority of English debutants to say they were like fish out of water. But there were occasional exceptions, and on this day Dominic Cork hustled and bustled England to a memorable 72-run victory over West Indies at Lord's. Cork, who also carved his first ball in Tests for four, took 7 for 43 in the second innings, the best figures by an English debutant.

    1937
    A distinctly forgettable Test debut for the great Len Hutton. Just three days after his 21st birthday, Hutton was pitched in against New Zealand at Lord's - and made 0 and 1, each time falling to the pace of Jack Cowie. Hutton was retained, though, and scored an even 100 in his next innings. After a career of 79 Tests and 6971 runs, it was clear the selectors had made the right decision.

    1973
    A famous Lord's let-off for England. New Zealand had failed to beat England, home or away, in 43 attempts when they took a 298-run lead on first innings in the second Test at Lord's. With nearly two days to go, England were in a hole. But the key moment came when the New Zealand wicketkeeper, Ken Wadsworth, dropped Geoff Arnold before he had scored; Arnold went on to save the match in a ninth-wicket stand of 92 with Keith Fletcher.

    1976
    One of cricket's unpronounceables is born. Zimbabwean seamer Mpumelelo Mbangwa - "Pommie" to most people - had his finest hour in Peshawar in 1998-99, when he grabbed match figures of 6 for 63 as Zimbabwe famously beat Pakistan. Mbangwa's Test record - 32 wickets at an average of 31 - was eminently respectable, although in 29 ODIs he only took 11 wickets at an average touching 104. Like so many of his generation, he turned his back on Zimbabwe when in his twenties and became a cricket commentator.

    1745
    The first recorded women's match was played at Gosden Common near Guildford, Surrey, between Bramley and Hambledon.

    1990
    The end of a dull draw between England and New Zealand at Lord's - but one that Richard Hadlee will never forget. Nine days before the match began, Hadlee was knighted in the Queen's birthday honours, and so became the third knight to play Test cricket. The other two, Sir Timothy O'Brien and Sir Vizianagram, were not knighted for services to the game.

    1878
    An example of the more calculating side of WG Grace. Gloucestershire's Billy Midwinter, a member of the Australian touring side, was persuaded by Grace to take a cab from Lord's to The Oval where Gloucestershire were about to play Surrey. Some reports suggest that Midwinter was duped, others that he was kidnapped by Grace from the Australian dressing room. In any event, Midwinter took no further part in the tour.

    1874
    Birth of the England allrounder Albert Relf, who played 13 Tests between 1903-04 and 1913-14. His finest hour came against Australia at Lord's in 1909, when he took 5 for 85 with his medium-pacers. Relf was also a useful batsman, who once opened in a Test - and made his highest score, of 63, against South Africa, in Johannesburg in 1913-14. He did the double of 1000 runs and 100 wickets eight times in ten seasons for Sussex. He died in Berkshire in 1937.

    1983
    Nick Compton, the grandson of the legendary Denis, is born in Natal. Raised in South Africa, Compton arrived in England as a teenager and played for the Under-19 side in 2001-02. But it was only in 2012 that he made headlines, finishing with 1494 runs at 99.60. It was enough to earn him a call-up for England's tour to India, replacing the retired Andrew Strauss as opener. Back-to-back hundreds on the 2013 tour to New Zealand seemed to have cemented his place in the side, but after a nervous time in the return series, he was dropped for the Ashes in the home summer. He started strongly, with an 85, in South Africa in 2015-16 but tailed away as the series went on.
    Other birthdays

    1932 Harry Bromfield (South Africa)
    1945 David Heyn (Sri Lanka)
    1913 Molly Dive (Australia)
    1952 Babu Meman (Zimbabwe)
    1961 David White (New Zealand)
    1980 Friedel de Wet (South Africa)

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    Cool June 27

    June 27 down the years
    England's own South African
    Kevin Pietersen makes an entrance
    The day two modern greats were born

    1980
    Birth of Kevin Pietersen, in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. KP signed for Nottinghamshire in 2000, and in 2004 was selected for England's tour of Zimbabwe, before he scored three ODI centuries in South Africa. He set the stamp on England's seismic Ashes win in 2005, the series in which he made his Test debut, with a phenomenal 158 on the final day of the series, at The Oval. In 2008, Pietersen took over the captaincy but he stepped down early in 2009 after an acrimonious falling out with coach Peter Moores. Pietersen's one-day form fell away and in 2012, he announced his limited-overs retirement to prolong his Test career. He was dropped after reports said he had sent derogatory text messages about his captain, Andrew Strauss, to South Africa players in 2012. He was invited back a few months later and his masterful 186 in Mumbai led England to their first series win in India in 28 years. The detente was short-lived. On the tour to Australia in 2013-14, there was a further deterioration in his relationship with coach Andy Flower, and the ECB brought down the curtain on his England career. Allegations thrown at many of his team-mates in his autobiography, which was released in October 2014, widened the divide.

    1983
    Dale Steyn, the South African fast bowler, is born in Phalaborwa. Steyn burst onto the scene in April 2006, when he finished a three-Test series against New Zealand with 16 wickets. He was the dominant force behind South Africa's home series wins against New Zealand and West Indies in 2007, picking up 40 wickets in five Tests. On the slow Motera pitch, in 2008, Steyn decimated the Indian line-up for 76, with figures of 8-2-23-5. Later that year he took ten wickets and made a crucial 76 in South Africa's first Test win in Australia, at the MCG. In 2010 he became the fourth fastest of all time to 200 wickets, reaching the mark in his 39th Test. He rocked Pakistan with a career-best 11 for 60 in Johannesburg in 2013 - including first-innings figures of 6 for 8 - and bagged nine wickets against India in Durban in a series-winning effort later that year. Another match-winning nine-for came against Sri Lanka in Galle in July 2014. One of the most iconic images of Steyn, though, might always remain that of him lying distraught on the Eden Park pitch after bowling a length ball that was dispatched by Grant Elliott for a six in the 2015 World Cup semi-final to hand South Africa more World Cup heartbreak. Late that year Steyn became the joint-fastest (with Richard Hadlee) to 400 Test wicket

    1939
    An unlucky charm is born. Fast bowler Neil Hawke did most of his best work in Australian defeats, where he took 29 wickets at an average of 21, including his Test-best figures, 7 for 105 against England in Sydney in 1965-66. Hawke is one of the few men to play for three states - Western Australia, South Australia and Tasmania - and was a top-quality Aussie Rules player as well. His nickname wasn't the most original, though: "Hawkeye" was prowling round cricket circles long before Channel 4's technology hit the screens. An extremely tough character, Hawke lived for 20 years after bowel surgery kickstarted a terrible run of ill-health. After he died on Christmas Day 2000, in Adelaide, his Wisden Cricket Monthly obituary was headlined: "They could not break his will."

    1939
    A renowned performance from the great George Headley. He became the first person to score two centuries in a Lord's Test, although West Indies still went down by eight wickets to England. It was the second time in his career that Headley had made two centuries in a Test, making him only the second person (after Herbert Sutcliffe) to do so. Headley's was a one-man show, though. Only one other West Indian passed 29 in the match, and England only lost seven wickets in completing victory.

    1949
    Martin Donnelly, one of New Zealand's greatest batsmen, stroked a glorious century against England on this day, which he extended to 206 on the third and final day. It completed a unique treble, which only Donnelly and Percy Chapman, another left-hander, have managed - Donnelly also made Lord's hundreds for Gentlemen against Players, and for Oxford against Cambridge. In addition to that he made a famous ton at Lord's for the Dominions against England - after which, a probably apocryphal story runs, a spectator went into a nearby pub, said, "I have just seen the most marvellous day's play," drank a double whisky and dropped dead.

    1886
    The Governor General of Australian cricket is born. That's how Charles Macartney, an outstanding allrounder from New South Wales, was known. He was a charming improviser of a batsman, who finished his Test career with a flourish, when he made three centuries in a row in his last series, in England in 1926. His left-arm spinners could also be very handy, and he took 11 for 85 against England when Australia won at Headingley in 1909. Macartney died in Sydney in 1958.

    1924
    Birth of Bob Appleyard, the Yorkshire and England offspinner whose career was dogged by poor health. As a result he only played nine Tests, but England won seven of them, and Appleyard snared 31 wickets at an average of only 17. He was like Derek Underwood: quickish, flat, and devastating on damp wickets. Appleyard did not make his first-class debut until he was 27, and had to retire at 34 because of sickness, but managed to take almost as many wickets (708) as he made runs (776).

    1899
    At a house match at Clifton College, 13-year-old Arthur Collins carried his bat for 628, an innings that spanned five days and contained one six, four fives, 31 fours, 33 threes, 146 twos and 87 singles. The feat, the highest cricket innings for more than a century before Mumbai teenager Pranav Dhanawade made 1009 not out in 2016, made national headlines and the schoolboy became a reluctant celebrity. Collins wasn't quite finished. As his weary opponents contemplated replying to a score of 836, Collins wreaked havoc with the ball, taking 7 for 33 and then 4 for 30 when they followed on.

    Other birthdays
    1914 Derrick Robins (England)
    1917 Khanderao Rangnekar (India)
    1938 Gordon Rorke (Australia)
    1943 Shirley Hodges (England)
    1964 Graham Cowdrey (England)
    1967 Karen Musson (New Zealand)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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