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Thread: Classic down memory lane : History of cricket

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    Default May 15 monday

    1935
    Lord Ted is born, in Milan, Italy. Ted Dexter was one of the most stylish batsmen England has produced, a magisterial dasher who loved to take on the very best bowlers. He frequently got England out of a hole - most notably with a marvellous 180 against Australia at Edgbaston in 1961 - and averaged 53 when they didn't lose, as against 28 when they did. Dexter's medium-pacers were good enough to claim 66 Test wickets too, and he was a brilliant all-round sportsman, excelling at golf as well. He also led Sussex to the first two Gillette Cups, and was a prime mover in setting up the PWC ratings.

    1948
    If you think the pace at which cricket is played these days is markedly faster than in earlier times, try this: Australia smashed 721 runs on this day against Essex at Southend-on-Sea, a first-class record that remains and will surely never be broken. Those 721 came off only 129 overs, with Don Bradman's 187 - made in just 125 minutes - the highest score. Keith Miller didn't approve of the carnage and was out - some say deliberately - for 0. For good measure, the Aussies then bowled Essex out for 83 and 187 the following day.

    2011
    In a low-scoring Test in Guyana, Ravi Rampaul and Darren Sammy bowled Pakistan out 40 short of the target. You had to feel for offspinner Saeed Ajmal, who took 11 wickets and ended on the losing side. It was a good game for debutant West Indies legspinner Devendra Bishoo, who took four wickets in the first innings and scored a vital 24 in the 48-run last-wicket stand with Shivnarine Chanderpaul in the second innings.

    1966
    Hardly a seismic change, but at Ilford Essex played Somerset in the County Championship, the first time that a match in the tournament had taken place on a Sunday.

    1924
    Birth of Worcestershire's greatest run-scorer. Don Kenyon scored 34,490 runs for the county, more than even Graeme Hick, and played eight Tests for England in the 1950s. He struggled at Test level, apart from a dogged 87 in an innings victory over South Africa at Trent Bridge in 1955. Kenyon also captained Worcestershire to long-overdue County Championship wins in 1964 and 1965. He died in Worcester in 1996.

    1999
    A World Cup is usually a time for new-fangled tricks: pinch-hitters, spinners opening the bowling. But on this day at Hove, South Africa took innovation too far for the ICC's liking. Their captain, Hansie Cronje, came onto the field with an earpiece that was wired up to his coach, Bob Woolmer, in the dressing room. The first drinks interval was as far as it got, when the match referee, Talat Ali, ordered Cronje to remove the offending earpiece. South Africa won the game, though, with Jacques Kallis pummelling 96 in an efficient chase of 254 against India.

    1919
    Birth of the author of one of first-class cricket's more remarkable spells of bowling. Charles Palmer did his best work as a flowing, free-scoring batsman, but his medium pace could be decidedly useful. For Leicestershire against the champions Surrey in 1955 he took eight wickets without conceding a run, seven of them bowled. Palmer had only brought himself on for an over to switch the bowlers round. His final match figures were 27-24-8-8... and Leicester still lost. The bespectacled Palmer played one Test for England, against West Indies, in Barbados in 1953-54.

    1917
    An Invincible is born. New South Wales wicketkeeper Ron Saggers was deputy to the great Don Tallon in Australia's famous 1948 team. A tidy, unobtrusive keeper, and good enough to play for New South Wales as a specialist batsman at times, Saggers played six Tests in all, the first at Headingley in 1948 and the rest in South Africa in 1949-50. He died in Sydney in 1987.
    Other birthdays
    1875 Joseph Vine (England)
    1875 Clem Wilson (England)
    1929 Jack Flavell (England)
    1941 BC Cooray (Sri Lanka)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.
    Last edited by UpdateA1; 23-08-2017 at 03:00 PM.

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    May 16 down the years

    Indian cricketers get arrested

    Ajit Chandila, Sreesanth and Ankeet Chavan were arrested by Delhi police

    2013
    The IPL had been hit by controversy before, but just as the sixth season came to a close, it got its biggest jolt when three Rajasthan Royals bowlers - Sreesanth, Ankeet Chavan and Ajit Chandila - were arrested by the Delhi police for allegedly fulfilling promises made to bookmakers. A week later, Gurunath Meyiappan, Chennai Super Kings' team principal and the son-in-law of BCCI president N Srinivasan, was arrested on charges of cheating, forgery and fraud. Pressure mounted on Srinivasan to hand in his resignation from the BCCI but he refused, even as the board secretary, treasurer and the IPL chairman handed in theirs. As a compromise, Srinivasan then agreed to step aside temporarily. The board set up an inquiry committee to look into the mess, but even before their investigations began, the Delhi police announced that the owner of the Rajasthan franchise, Raj Kundra, had confessed to betting on IPL matches.


    1956
    Jim Laker took all ten wickets for Surrey in a tour match against the Australians, a feat he would famously repeat in the Old Trafford Test later that summer. Here Laker took 10 for 88 and his spin partner Tony Lock 0 for 100 on a turner so raging that Ray Lindwall bowled only two out of 133 overs in Surrey's first innings. Ten weeks later Laker took 10 for 53 in the second innings of the fourth Test, to make it 19 for 90 in that match. Poor Lock was again the bridesmaid, with 1 for 116. Here, though, he at least cleaned up in the second innings, taking seven wickets to Laker's two. Lock himself also took all ten that summer, for Surrey against Kent at Blackheath, and 16 in the match. Laker wasn't playing, mind you.

    2010
    England's first global tournament win - and it came against Australia. England began the World T20 with a loss against hosts West Indies and a no-result against Ireland, but won their next four games to enter the final in Barbados, where it took them just 17 overs to chase 148. Ryan Sidebottom took 2 for 26 and Craig Kieswetter hit 63 off 49 balls.

    1953
    More remarkable events at The Oval where Surrey bowled out Warwickshire for 45 and 52 to win by an innings and 49 runs - and all inside a day, and one which started late because of overnight rain. Alec Bedser took 8 for 18 and 4 for 17, Laker a hat-trick, and in all, ten Warwickshire batsmen recorded ducks. The Warwickshire innings lasted 75 minutes and 70 minutes.

    1906
    Birth of the Australian fast bowler Ernie McCormick, who played 12 Tests just before the Second World War. At his best McCormick was genuinely quick, but he was constantly plagued by back trouble. Like Shane Warne, he took a wicket with his first ball in Ashes Tests: Stan Worthington, caught behind off the first delivery of the 1936-37 Brisbane Test, and in the same match he inflicted Wally Hammond's first Ashes duck. In his opening match in England, at Worcester in 1938, McCormick was no-balled for overstepping no fewer than 35 times, 19 of them in his first three overs. He died in Tweed Heads, New South Wales, in
    1991.

    1938
    Don Bradman continued his amazing start to Australia's England tour with a massive 278 against MCC at Lord's. It came in only 349 minutes and included 35 fours and a six. His run of scores prior to the Test series were: 258, 58, 137, 278, 2, 143, 145*, 5, 30*. He didn't do too badly when the real action started either. Bradman cracked 434 runs at an average of 108 in the Tests.

    1972
    When left-arm spinner Matthew Hart, who was born today, made his New Zealand debut as a 21-year-old against Pakistan in Wellington in 1993-94, he was talked up as the next big thing. As it turned out, that was Daniel Vettori, and Hart's 12-Test career was a disappointment. He did play one match-winning hand, however, when he took eight South African wickets in Johannesburg in 1994-95. But too often Hart was anodyne: his strike rate was a wicket every 106 balls.

    1982
    Jamaican left-arm spinner Nikita Miller, born today, made his one-day debut in 2008. He took two wickets in the two games he got against Australia, and was picked for the series against Pakistan in Abu Dhabi. Miller got his chance in Tests when most of the senior players boycotted the home series against Bangladesh in 2009, but he went wicketless in the one match he played. He went on to play the Champions Trophy, where he scored his maiden half-century, against Pakistan. Miller was picked for the 2011 World Cup but he went wicketless in the three games he played in the tournament.
    Other birthdays

    1914 Joy Liebert (England)
    1962 Gary Crocker (Zimbabwe)
    1975 Niroshan Bandaratilleke (Sri Lanka)
    1976 Dirk Nannes (Australia)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    Default May 17

    May 17 down the years
    One of India's greatest match-winners is born

    1945
    When legspinner Bhagwath Chandrasekhar, born today, performed, India usually had reason to celebrate: he averaged 19 with the ball (and had a sensational strike rate of 45) when they won, 37 when they didn't. And this at a time when legspin was a virtually dead art. An attack of polio as a child left his right arm weak, but there was nothing wrong with his wrists, and he fizzed the ball both ways at something close to medium pace. Chandrasekhar delivered overseas too, bowling India to victory most famously at The Oval in 1971 and Melbourne in 1977-78. Chandra was also a gloriously inept batsman, who failed to score in 38 of his 80 Test innings. He ended up with 242 Test wickets - and only 167 runs.

    1888
    Birth of the only man ever to take 300 wickets in a first-class season. Kent legspinner Alfred "Tich" Freeman's annus mirabilis was in 1928, when he took a staggering 304 wickets. In all, Freeman took more than 250 wickets in a season six times; it's only been achieved 12 times. Twelve is an apposite number for Freeman - that's also how many Tests he played. He'd taken three ten-fors in his last four Tests when he lined up for what turned out to be his final Test, against South Africa at The Oval in 1929. Freeman took 0 for 169 and was not picked again. His first-class record suggests he should have played more Tests, but there was always a suspicion that the best batsmen could negate his slow floaters with dancing feet, and against Australia he averaged 57. He retired to a house called Dunbolin, and died in Kent in 1965.

    1947
    Nobody has had longer between Test appearances than offspinner John Traicos, who was born in Egypt on this day. He played three Tests for South Africa in 1969-70 - their last before isolation - then popped up 22 years 222 days later in Zimbabwe's inaugural Test, against India in Harare in 1992-93. Traicos was 45 by then, but he still had plenty in his locker: off his gentle four-pace run-up, he returned figures of 50-16-86-5, including 19-year-old Sachin Tendulkar, caught-and-bowled third-ball for 0. Traicos was also a brilliant fielder in his prime, particularly at gully.

    1895
    Batting for Gloucestershire against Somerset in Bristol, the great WG Grace became the first man to score 100 first-class hundreds. He went on to reach three figures on 126 occasions. It took Grace 1113 innings to reach 100 hundreds, making him the slowest of the 24 men to achieve the feat.

    1997
    A quite brutal display from Sanath Jayasuriya in the Pepsi Cup match in Mumbai. Sri Lanka needed only 226 to beat India but Jayasuriya still found time to smear 151 not out off 120 balls, an innings that included 17 fours and four sixes. The rest of the Sri Lankan team managed 65 off 127 balls between them. At the time it was the highest ODI score by a Sri Lankan; Jayasuriya bettered that with 189, also against India, in Sharjah in 2000-01
    .
    2001
    An early start to a Lord's Test, and an emphatic win for England. The Premiership football season was not even finished when England and Pakistan began the first Test, also England's 100th at Lord's. And England had rarely been so comprehensively victorious here before: they pummelled a good Pakistan side by an innings, effectively within three days, with Darren Gough taking his 200th wicket in Tests.

    1955
    A reputation as one of the greatest fast bowlers of all time often obscures Ray Lindwall's abundant batting talent. And on this day he whacked his second Test century, 118 against West Indies in Barbados in Australia's mammoth first-innings total of 668.

    1932
    Peter Burge, born on this day, was a pugnacious middle-order batsman who played 42 Tests for Australia between 1955 and 1966. He scored four hundreds, each against England; his Test best of 181 came in a drawn Test at The Oval in 1961. After retirement he joined the ICC as one of the first match referees and was the first to suspend a player - Aqib Javed of Pakistan, in 1992-93 - for abuse of an umpire. Burge was also referee during the "dirt in the pocket" incident at Lord's in 1994. Upset that Mike Atherton hadn't told him the exact reason for why he had kept dust in his pocket - "to maintain the condition of the ball" - Burge fined him half his match fee in the Oval Test.

    1968
    Birth of a man who coached both South Africa and Australia. Mickey Arthur, a consistent first-class batsman, was a slightly surprising choice as South Africa's national coach in 2005 but gradually established himself as one of the keys to their improvement. He oversaw their first series win in England in 43 years and capped his tenure with another series win in Australia. He moved to Western Australia in 2010 and then took over the Australia job - as their first foreign coach - the following year. His stint was not very successful, though, and ended after a period of high drama following the decision to suspend four players for a Test during a series in India over failing to complete a team "homework" assignment. In 2016 he replaced Waqar Younis as Pakistan's coach.

    Other birthdays
    1923 Olive Smith (Australia)
    1932 Polly Marshall (England)
    1944 Arif Butt (Pakistan)
    1969 Ujesh Ran**** (Zimbabwe)
    1971 Ally Kuylaars (South Africa
    1976 Edgar Schiferli (Netherlands)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    May 18 : Thursday

    May 18 down the years

    The author of the cheapest ten-for in first-class history is born
    Hedley Verity: the man whose bunny was Don Bradman

    1905
    The great Hedley Verity, born today, one of the long line of famous Yorkshire slow left-armers, took 10 for 10 against Nottinghamshire at Headingley in 1931. As well as surprisingly being the only ten-for ever to include a hat-trick, it was his second of the summer, Warwickshire having also been on the receiving end on the same ground (10 for 36). Verity's 40-Test career included some startling performances, most notably 15 for 104 at Lord's in England's only 20th-century Ashes victory there, in 1934. And nobody snared Don Bradman more often in Tests than Verity, who did it eight times. He was just 38 when he died in a prisoner-of-war camp in Caserta, Italy, in 1943. He ended with 1956 first-class wickets at the startling average of 14.90, and a strike rate of a wicket every 42 balls.

    1955
    In the fourth Test against Australia in Barbados, West Indies began the third day on 187 for 6, still the small matter of 481 runs behind Australia. They were in all sorts of trouble, but Denis Atkinson and Clairmonte Depeiaza had other ideas. They were still there at the close, having taken the score to 494 and become only the second pair to bat through an entire day's play in a Test. Their partnership of 347 remains a Test record for the seventh wicket; at the time it was a first-class record as well. Atkinson made 219, his only Test hundred, and Depeiaza 122, his only first-class hundred. Unsurprisingly, the match was drawn.

    1959
    An unlucky charm is born. It's an odd statistic that Graham Dilley was on the winning side in only two of his 41 Tests. One of those was at Headingley in 1981 - when he gave it some humpty and matched Ian Botham run for run in their famous partnership - and the other at the Gabba in 1986-87, when Dilley, who at his best was genuinely quick, took his first Test five-for and set the tone for a triumphant tour. All six of Dilley's five-fors came between November 1986 and June 1988, but after that he played only four Tests. He went on to become England's bowling coach for a time from 2001-02. Dilley died at the age of 52 after a short illness.

    1935
    Few debut nerves at Frome, where Harold Gimblett walloped 123 in 80 minutes in his first match for Somerset. Essex were the victims, Gimblett having come to the crease with his side in trouble at 107 for 6. Wisden said he "cut, drove, pulled and hooked in a manner that set cricket circles talking for weeks of his audacious batting". Within a year he was playing for England.

    1940
    Birth of Pat Trimborn, the Natal seamer who played in South Africa's last Test before their isolation, against Australia in Port Elizabeth in 1969-70. His match figures - 37.2-5-91-4 - were typical Trimborn: economical, reliable, and occasionally penetrative. He only played four Tests, all against Australia. On his debut, in Durban in 1966-67, he was one of no fewer than six seam bowlers in the South African side.

    Other birthdays
    1925 Nigel Howard (England)
    1970 Carl Tuckett (West Indies)
    1972 Amay Khurasiya (India)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    Default May 19

    May 19 down the years
    Birth of the man who scored at over 80 runs an hour
    Gilbert Jessop: more savage than Richards and Gilchrist?

    1874
    The original entertainer is born. Gilbert Jessop was arguably a fiercer hitter than Viv Richards, Ian Botham, Adam Gilchrist, or anyone else who has belted leather for a living, and his feats with the willow are legendary. Known as "The Croucher" for his unusual stance, he hit his first ball for Gloucestershire for four, having come in on a hat-trick, and his 53 first-class centuries came at the unbelievable average rate of 82.7 runs an hour. At Hove in 1903, he smashed 286 against Sussex in under three hours. He also creamed 157 in an hour against West Indies in 1900. In 18 Tests he made only one hundred, but what an innings it was. Against Australia on a poor Oval wicket in 1902, England were 48 for 5 chasing 263 when Jessop entered the arena. He walloped 104 in only 77 minutes, out of 139 runs scored while he was at the crease, and England eventually crept home by one wicket. Jessop was also a genuinely fast bowler and sensational in the covers. He died in Dorset in 1955.
    1910
    Only 11 Tests for Alan Melville, the stylish South African opener who was born today, but he certainly made the most of them, making four centuries and averaging 52. Those four centuries came in consecutive innings - but were spread over nine years. Melville cracked 103 in Durban in 1938-39, South Africa's last Test before the war, and hit 189, 104 not out, and 117 in England in 1947. Immediately before that first century, Melville made 67 and 78. Oddly, in 13 other Test innings, he only once reached 50. Melville also captained Sussex in 1934 and 1935. He died in Sabie, Transvaal in 1983.
    1988
    One of the joys of the old Texaco Trophy was to see which rabbit the England selectors would pull from the hat. On this day, against West Indies at Edgbaston, Monte Lynch made his England debut - and was run out second ball after being sent back by his captain, Mike Gatting. It didn't get much better - Lynch made 2 and 6 in the next two games and was not picked again. England won though, by six wickets, the first of eight victories in nine ODIs at home to West Indies.
    1981
    Jamie How, born today, made his one-day debut for New Zealand on New Year's Eve in 2005 with a half-century against Sri Lanka. When West Indies toured New Zealand in early 2006, How made 66 in an ODI in Wellington, but he did little in his debut Test series against the same opposition. He did well against the visiting England side two years later, making 92 in a win in Hamilton, his maiden one-day hundred (in Christchurch) and two more half-centuries in New Zealand's return series. But he wasn't consistent enough and lost his place as New Zealand continued experimenting with different openers.

    Other birthdays
    1876 Joe Humphries (England)
    1924 Barbara Murrey (England)
    1954 Sharyn Hill (Australia)
    1957 Shaun Graf (Australia)
    1965 Edward "Tito" Odumbe (Kenya)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    Default May 19

    May 19 down the years
    Birth of the man who scored at over 80 runs an hour
    Gilbert Jessop: more savage than Richards and Gilchrist?

    1874
    The original entertainer is born. Gilbert Jessop was arguably a fiercer hitter than Viv Richards, Ian Botham, Adam Gilchrist, or anyone else who has belted leather for a living, and his feats with the willow are legendary. Known as "The Croucher" for his unusual stance, he hit his first ball for Gloucestershire for four, having come in on a hat-trick, and his 53 first-class centuries came at the unbelievable average rate of 82.7 runs an hour. At Hove in 1903, he smashed 286 against Sussex in under three hours. He also creamed 157 in an hour against West Indies in 1900. In 18 Tests he made only one hundred, but what an innings it was. Against Australia on a poor Oval wicket in 1902, England were 48 for 5 chasing 263 when Jessop entered the arena. He walloped 104 in only 77 minutes, out of 139 runs scored while he was at the crease, and England eventually crept home by one wicket. Jessop was also a genuinely fast bowler and sensational in the covers. He died in Dorset in 1955.
    1910
    Only 11 Tests for Alan Melville, the stylish South African opener who was born today, but he certainly made the most of them, making four centuries and averaging 52. Those four centuries came in consecutive innings - but were spread over nine years. Melville cracked 103 in Durban in 1938-39, South Africa's last Test before the war, and hit 189, 104 not out, and 117 in England in 1947. Immediately before that first century, Melville made 67 and 78. Oddly, in 13 other Test innings, he only once reached 50. Melville also captained Sussex in 1934 and 1935. He died in Sabie, Transvaal in 1983.
    1988
    One of the joys of the old Texaco Trophy was to see which rabbit the England selectors would pull from the hat. On this day, against West Indies at Edgbaston, Monte Lynch made his England debut - and was run out second ball after being sent back by his captain, Mike Gatting. It didn't get much better - Lynch made 2 and 6 in the next two games and was not picked again. England won though, by six wickets, the first of eight victories in nine ODIs at home to West Indies.
    1981
    Jamie How, born today, made his one-day debut for New Zealand on New Year's Eve in 2005 with a half-century against Sri Lanka. When West Indies toured New Zealand in early 2006, How made 66 in an ODI in Wellington, but he did little in his debut Test series against the same opposition. He did well against the visiting England side two years later, making 92 in a win in Hamilton, his maiden one-day hundred (in Christchurch) and two more half-centuries in New Zealand's return series. But he wasn't consistent enough and lost his place as New Zealand continued experimenting with different openers.

    Other birthdays
    1876 Joe Humphries (England)
    1924 Barbara Murrey (England)
    1954 Sharyn Hill (Australia)
    1957 Shaun Graf (Australia)
    1965 Edward "Tito" Odumbe (Kenya)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    Default May 20

    May 20 down the year
    The birth of Deryck Murray

    Deryck Murray finished with 189 Test victims in 62 Tests

    1943
    In Trinidad, one of West Indies' finest wicketkeepers is born. Deryck Murray was a soothing presence behind the stumps in 62 Tests between 1963 - when he made his debut at Old Trafford aged 20, and snared 24 scalps in the series - and 1980. When he was left out of the Trinidad Test the following winter, locals boycotted the match and the pitch was vandalised. As well as being undemonstrative, efficient, and totally reliable with the gloves on, the boyish Murray turned himself into a useful batsman. Though he never managed a Test hundred, he made 11 fifties, four of them in Australia in 1975-76, when more illustrious batsmen were being blown away by Lillee and Thomson. He later became a significant administrative figure.

    1944
    The Gnome is born. The popular Keith Fletcher was a fine batsman and captain of Essex, and though his Test career was a success, he sometimes struggled to impose himself at the top level. He averaged only 19 after 17 Tests, but then came a steady stream of match-saving, and occasionally match-winning, centuries, including 146 in Melbourne in 1974-75. The Centenary Test two years later seemed to be his last, but he returned to captain England in India in 1981-82. England lost the first Test and players and spectators were bored to tears as the remaining five snoozed to draws. Fletcher was also the captain when England took on Sri Lanka in that team's inaugural Test straight after, but was then dumped, this time for good.


    1911
    One of the most remarkable onslaughts of all time, at Hove, where Ted Alletson and William Riley added 152 for Nottinghamshire's tenth wicket against Sussex. That only tells half the story, though, because when the carnage ended Riley was left on 10 not out. Alletson smeared 189 in 90 minutes of mayhem. In the 50 minutes before lunch he scored a sedate 47; in the seven overs after the interval he smashed 115 out of 120, and his last 89 came in 15 minutes. It was his only first-class hundred.


    1965
    A shock for the members at Middlesbrough, as Yorkshire were skittled for their lowest-ever total, a pathetic 23, by Hampshire. The side included some big names: Boycott, Hampshire, Close, Sharpe, Illingworth and Trueman, but after a sound start Yorkshire tumbled from 7 for 0 to 13 for 8. Yorkshire had also been 47 for 7 in their first innings, and only a rumbustious 55 from Trueman got them anywhere near eventual first-innings parity. Hampshire needed just 20 to win; they scraped home in eight overs with ten wickets to spare.

    1956
    Birth of the Australian opener Andrew Hilditch, a qualified solicitor. But as a batsman, Hilditch never managed to cut out the hook, a stroke that consistently brought about his downfall. Both his Test centuries came in the space of three innings, against West Indies and England in a purple patch in 1984-85, but his penchant for the fatal hook shot soon became a standing joke on that England tour of 1985. He played only one Test after that - and he was out twice hooking Richard Hadlee. Hilditch had no reasonable defence, and was dumped for good as Australia turned to Geoff Marsh and David Boon. Hilditch was also Test cricket's second handled-the-ball victim: in Perth in 1978-79, he was the non-striker when he returned a loose throw to the bowler, Sarfraz Nawaz, who appealed, whereupon Hilditch was given out. He served as Australia's chairman of selectors in the mid-2000s
    .
    1989
    Birth of England wicketkeeper Sarah Taylor, who burst onto the scene as a 17-year-old in 2006 with a run-a-ball 61 in her fourth ODI against India. A maiden century followed, early the next year against Australia in Chennai. Taylor was part of the England sides that won the World Cup and World T20 in 2009. As a keeper, she has claimed some sharp dismissals standing up to the stumps. After the 2016 World T20, she announced she would be taking an indefinite break from the game, at 26.


    1977
    Birth of Anjum Chopra, a left-handed opener for India who has been compared to David Gower. Chopra was one of India's premier batsmen and played in four World Cups. She was rewarded for her consistent performance over the years when she won the Arjuna award, one of India's highest sporting honours, in 2007. She played her final game for India in 2012, and then got into television commentary.

    1982
    Birth of Imran Farhat, a free-stroking left-hand Pakistan batsman. Farhat was born into a sporting family; his father and one sister played badminton, another sister played hockey and brother Humayun represented Pakistan in cricket. Farhat made a century in his sixth Test, against South Africa in 2003, and another against India four Tests later. In 200,7 upset at being overlooked by the selectors, Farhat joined the unofficial ICL. He returned to the fold in 2009, scoring an unbeaten century in Napier in his comeback series, but faded out of the Test side a year later - though he played a match in 2013, and also made an ODI comeback that year.
    Other birthdays

    1947 Gopal Bose (India)
    1963 Dipak Chudasama (Kenya)
    1967 Sandra Kottman (Netherlands)
    1974 Sajjad Ahmed (Bangladesh)
    1978 Ramesh Powar (India)
    1982 Kaushal Lokuarachchi (Sri Lanka)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    Default May 21

    May 21 down the year
    Saeed Anwar's 194 was the highest individual score in ODIs

    1997
    Saeed Anwar battered India in the Independence Cup match in Chennai, smearing 194 off only 146 balls - then the biggest individual score in ODIs - in Pakistan's 35-run victory. None of his team-mates got more than 39. It might have helped that he had Shahid Afridi as a runner from the 19th over - Anwar was free to concentrate on bashing boundaries, and he did: there were 22 fours and five sixes, three of them off consecutive deliveries from Anil Kumble.
    1993
    Another brutal one-day display, this time the highest individual score in England's one-day international history. Robin Smith's violent 167 not out at Edgbaston - at the time the highest score anyone has made on the losing side in an ODI - started fairly sedately. He went to his first one-day hundred off 136 deliveries, but then careered to 150 in another 20 balls as Paul Reiffel (11-1-70-1) disappeared to all parts. Thanks to Smith, England made 277 for 5, but Australia overhauled the total with a chilling efficiency, coasting to victory with nine balls and six wickets to spare.
    1867
    Birth of JJ Ferris, the deadly left-arm swing bowler who played Test cricket for Australia and England. In his eight Tests for the Aussies, Ferris wreaked havoc alongside Charlie Turner. His first act as a Test player was to bowl England out for 45, in Sydney in 1886-87, when he and Turner bowled unchanged. He later settled in England, for whom he played one Test, in Cape Town in 1891-92. Ferris took 13 for 91 in the match, and ended up with 61 wickets at the amazing average of 12.70. He was only 33 when he died of enteric fever in Durban in 1900 during the Boer War.
    2016
    England demolished Sri Lanka inside three days at Headingley, courtesy a ten-wicket haul by James Anderson. A young Sri Lankan batting line-up struggled against the moving ball, failing to pass 100 in the first innings, and managing only 119 in the second, to lose by an innings and 88 runs. There were signs of a fightback at 93 for 3 on the third day, but Anderson and Steven Finn had the final say, and Sri Lanka lost their last eight for just 26 runs. Local boy Jonny Bairstow made 140 in England's innings and followed it up with nine catches behind the stumps, equalling the record for the most catches in a Test in England.

    1985
    England medium-pacer Isa Guha is born. Guha made her international debut in 2001, aged 16, and three years later she starred in England's one-day series win against New Zealand in 2004, taking 5 for 22 in the fourth match. Her most memorable performance came in the Bowral Test in 2007-08, when she took a match-winning 9 for 100 to help England retain the Ashes. Guha was part of a successful side that won the Women's World Cup and World T20 tournaments in 2009, and the Ashes in 2005. She retired from international cricket at 26, before embarking on a career in the media and broadcasting.

    1893
    An England captain is born. Arthur Carr led England against Australia in 1926, when he pulled out of the fifth Test with tonsillitis and lost his job to Percy Chapman, and then South Africa three years later. He was a staunch advocate of Bodyline - he captained Harold Larwood and Bill Voce at Nottinghamshire - and his support for Larwood brought his career as a player and administrator to an early close in 1934. He died in Yorkshire in 1963.
    1863
    Birth of the fleet-footed Australian opener Jack Lyons, who played 14 Tests in the 19th century. A handsome driver but vulnerable against the spinners - England's slow left-armer Johnny Briggs nailed him seven times - he made his only Test hundred in Sydney in 1891-92, when England were beaten by 72 runs. But his best innings came against MCC on Australia's 1893 tour, when he cracked 149 not out in just 90 minutes. He died in Adelaide in 1927.
    2000
    Hoodoo, what hoodoo? England had only won four of their previous 23 Tests at Lord's, but they demolished Zimbabwe by an innings and 209 runs - their biggest victory for 26 years - as the first seven-Test summer in England got under way. Zimbabwe never recovered from being reduced to 8 for 3 by Andy Cad**** on the first morning, and Ed Giddins took 5 for 15 in only his second Test. Within a month Giddins was dropped.
    Other birthdays
    1890 Harry Smith (England)
    1906 Keith Rigg (Australia)
    1929 Paul Winslow (South Africa)
    1930 Kit Raymond (Australia)
    1955 Liaqat Ali (Pakistan)
    1958 Monte Lynch (England)

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    Birth of a fine batsman, useful legspinner and great captain

    Warwick Armstrong played 50 Tests for Australia

    1879
    Birth of the man who led Australia to the first whitewash in Ashes history. Warwick Armstrong was at the helm for the 5-0 thrashing in 1920-21 - the only clean sweep until Ricky Ponting's men matched it in 2006-07. It was Armstrong's first series as Aussie skipper and Australia also won the next three Tests under his stewardship, in England the following summer. Nobody has beaten his record of eight consecutive Ashes wins. Armstrong, who was known as "The Big Ship" - he weighed 22 stone (140 kilograms) by the time he retired - was a fine, cussed batsman and a useful, skiddy legspinner who took three Test five-fors. His finest series with the bat was in that 1920-21 rout, when he made three centuries, including a Test-best 158 in Sydney. Armstrong, who also worked as a whisky merchant, died in Sydney in 1947.

    1940
    An aesthete is born. Indian Erapalli Prasanna was the original artistic offspinner, relying on flight, cunning, stealth and grace. He was never afraid to give the ball air, and if that didn't do for batsmen, then the inordinate bounce he got often did. His 189 wickets was the highest by an Indian offie till Harbhajan Singh went past that mark. Five of Prasanna's six best returns came overseas, including a Test-best 8 for 76 against New Zealand in Auckland in 1975-76. India were victorious then, maintaining the pattern of Pras' career: he averaged 17 when they won, 39 when they didn't.

    1945
    With the end of the Second World War, first-class cricket could resume in England after a five-year hiatus. The cricket-starved and war-ravaged public responded enthusiastically to five three-day games between the Australian Services (the RAAF and the AIF) and England. The first match was played at Lord's and Keith Miller's century gave the Australians a first-innings lead of 188. England couldn't recover after legspinner Cec Pepper took 4 for 80 in their second innings. The Australians won by six wickets. Wisden wrote of the match: "Some of the chosen men, coming almost straight from battlefields to the headquarters of cricket, must have regarded the first encounter primarily as a reunion with many old friends, so that a thoroughly serious view of the game, such as the Australians clearly held, was too much to expect." The series was drawn 2-2.

    1965
    One of the most successful bowlers in the women's game was born today. Medium-pacer Clare Taylor was the first England woman player to reach 100 international wickets and was the second highest wicket-taker overall at the World Cup in 2000. She played 16 Tests and 105 ODIs, was made a Member of the British Empire in 2000 for services to cricket and was also one of the England side that won the 1993 World Cup at Lord's. She was also a talented footballer, having represented Liverpool Ladies as well as playing in the football World Cup. After retiring in 2005, she coached at the women's academy in Durham and later worked with the New Zealand
    women.
    1987
    A Pakistan wicketkeeper is born. Sarfraz Ahmed was part of the victorious 2006 Under-19 World Cup side in Bangladesh and got his first opportunity with the senior side a year later. Competition from the Akmal brothers meant that he was in and out of the side - he didn't play a Test for three years, and it was only in 2013 that he became a regular in the Test and ODI squads. He moulded himself into an attacking batsman, earning a promotion in ODIs, where he even audaciously swept medium-pacers for sixes. Three Test centuries in 2014, against Sri Lanka, Australia and New Zealand, marked his second coming.


    1919
    One of cricket's strangest moments in Taunton where Arthur Heygate was in effect timed out, although since no such law existed he was recorded as absent. With the scores tied, Sussex's last man, Heygate, who had injured a leg, painfully walked to the middle in his normal clothes only for the umpires to rule he had not got there in time even though it was thought both captains were happy to continue. The debate raged for several days before MCC ruled that the officials were right.

    1907
    Only twice in history has a bowler taken two hat-tricks in an innings, and for Middlesex against Somerset at Lord's on this day, Albert Trott became the first. Better still, it was in his benefit match. And after the first hat-trick, he took another next ball to make it four in four. Ironically Trott's burst of 7 for 20, which skittled Somerset for 97, was the last act of the match and so didn't add to his benefit gate. The other man to achieve the feat is Indian medium-pacer Joginder Rao.

    1864
    Birth of the first Australian southpaw to tour England. Whether opening or in the middle order, William Bruce was a real dasher, but his uncertain defence left him vulnerable. He played some fine innings, though, most notably a delightful 80 in Adelaide in 1894-95. He was also a useful medium-pacer, and seven of his 12 Test victims were out bowled. He later became a solicitor. Bruce was found drowned in his native Melbourne in 1925.

    1979
    In Solihull, Singapore beat Argentina by one wicket in the first match of the inaugural ICC Trophy. The purpose of the tournament was to decide which two teams would take part in the World Cup, but the schedule was a bit of a farce: Canada and Sri Lanka booked their places in the World Cup by winning their semi-finals on June 6. The World Cup began three days later, but the ICC Trophy final, which Sri Lanka won, was not played until June 21 - in between the semi-finals and the final of the World Cup. It all makes Duckworth and Lewis look straightforward.

    1927
    Birth of the New Zealand wicketkeeper Eric Petrie, who played 14 Tests between 1955-56 and 1965-66, none of which his side won. He was dependable behind the stumps but limited with the bat: his average didn't hit double figures until his 12th match, when he made a Test-best 55 against England in Christchurch.

    2010
    A T20 was played in Florida, USA, between New Zealand and Sri Lanka. The organisers must have hoped the shortest format would prove attractive to the locals, but the slow and low pitch made it a dull affair even for die-hard cricket fans. New Zealand managed only 120 in their 20 overs and then took 19.4 overs to dismiss Sri Lanka for 92. The second match, a day later, had even lower scores. Sri Lanka lost three wickets in chasing New Zealand's 81.


    Other birthdays
    1859 Arthur Conan Doyle (England)
    1924 Cecilia Robinson (England)
    1964 Gamini Perera (Sri Lanka)

    ? ESPN Sports.com

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    May 23 down the years
    The birth of Compo

    1918
    Denis Compton, born today, was the original Brylcreem boy. He was a breathtakingly talented batsman, renowned for the latest of sweeps, who had all the cavalier abandon and audacity of youth, although he was from the Inzamam school of yes-no running: Trevor Bailey described a call from Compton as "a basis for negotiation". As well as that, Compton was a fine fielder and a dangerous, unorthodox left-arm spinner. His annus mirabilis was 1947, when he made 3816 runs, including a record 18 centuries, 11 of them in the County Championship for Middlesex. For good measure, he took 72 wickets. Compton made 17 Test hundreds in all, 13 of them in England; the highest was 278 against Pakistan at Trent Bridge in 1954. He also made the fastest triple-century in first-class history, smashed in 181 minutes for MCC against NE Transvaal in Benoni in 1948-49.

    1966
    In Salisbury, Rhodesia, the enigma that is Graeme Hick is born. Hick was dismissed by many as a front-foot thumper who was found out at the top level, but only in 20 years' time will we fully appreciate just what an unlikely failure his was: this was a man who smashed 405 not out against Somerset in 1988, who scored 2000 first-class runs at the age of 20 in 1986 (the youngest ever), who smashed 100 first-class hundreds by the age of 32. Hick retired in 2008, having become one of the most prolific run scorers of all time, with over 63,000 runs in all forms of the game and 136 first-class hundreds.

    1899
    An unproductive benefit match for Nottinghamshire's Wilf Flowers, not least because the game took place at Lord's between Middlesex and Somerset, a curiosity explained by the fact Flowers had been on the MCC ground staff for many years. The first day was washed out and on the second Middlesex won by an innings inside five hours, scoring 86 and bowling the visitors out for 44 and 34 (Albert Trott took 11 for 31).

    1963
    Given his record, Trinidad paceman Tony Gray, who was born today, was a bit unlucky not to play more than five Tests and 25 one-day internationals. His stats are sensational: Gray averaged 17.13 with the ball in Tests and 18.97 in one-dayers. He took 6 for 50 against Australia on his home ground in 1990-91. A height of 6ft 6in allowed Gray to generate disconcerting bounce, which combined with genuine pace made him a fearsome proposition. But injuries, and the emergence of the likes of Ian Bishop, limited Gray's appearances.

    1969
    A tragic day for Colin Milburn who was involved in a car accident that necessitated the removal of his left eye. Milburn was a popular, hard-hitting batsman, who two months earlier had smacked a big hundred against Pakistan. He briefly made an ill-advised comeback in 1973 but was a shadow of his former self.

    1965
    WV Raman, the Indian opener who was born today, made his debut against West Indies in Chennai in 1987-88, the match in which another debutant, Narendra Hirwani, took 16 wickets. Not surprisingly, therefore, Raman's contribution was overshadowed, but he made a crucial 83 in the second innings. That was the highlight of a mixed 11-Test career, although he also made 96, his highest score, in Christchurch in 1989-90. He made 313 for Tamil Nadu against Goa in Panjim in 1988-89.

    Other birthdays
    1903 Bill Farrimond (England)
    1923 Nirode Chowdhury (India)
    1924 Narain Swamy (India)
    1954 Ray Phillips (Australia)
    1968 Mark Alleyne (England)
    1972 Martin Saggers (England)
    1974 Darren Maddy (England)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    Ali Bacher captained one of South Africa's strongest sides

    1942
    Birth of the godfather of South African cricket. Ali Bacher was a chunky No. 3 batsman who captained one of the finest Test teams in history - the 1969-70 side, which included such luminaries as Graeme Pollock, Barry Richards and Mike Procter, and beat Australia 4-0 in South Africa's final series before isolation. Bacher played 12 Tests in all, with a highest score of 73 in Port Elizabeth in the final match of that series, but he is best known for his work as an administrator - both before and after South Africa's return to the fold in 1991. He organised numerous rebel tours - his chief motivation was to provide spectators with high-quality cricket - introduced coaching courses to black townships, and was managing director of the UCB from 1991 to 2000.

    2004
    The perfect finish for Nasser Hussain at Lord's in the first Test against New Zealand. On the final day England were 35 for 2 chasing 282 when Hussain, whose place was under scrutiny, came to the crease. He ran out Andrew Strauss to deprive him of twin hundreds on debut, but saw England past the winning post. Hussain smashed consecutive fours to bring up his hundred, then spanked the winning runs through the covers as England made a daunting chase look easy. Two days later he announced his retirement from all cricket.

    2009
    An IPL final... in Johannesburg between Deccan Chargers and Royal Challengers Bangalore. Herschelle Gibbs made an unbeaten 53 but Anil Kumble took 4 for 16 (including the wicket of Adam Gilchrist in the first over), to keep Deccan Chargers to 143 - a total three fewer than Bangalore had chased easily in the semi-final. However, Deccan returned to bowl with aggression and energy - Andrew Symonds took two in two balls, to go with his crucial 21-ball 33 earlier in the day - and clinched the title by six runs.

    2015
    Another IPL final - the eighth, and this time it was Mumbai Indians who crushed Chennai Super Kings, handing them their fourth loss in six IPL finals, by 41 runs to cruise to their second title. They had beaten the same opposition at the same venue, Eden Gardens, to clinch their maiden title in 2013. This time round, a couple of weeks into the tournament, they looked like they would not get anywhere near the playoffs: they lost their first four matches, and five of their first six. Thereafter, though, they were beaten just once in ten games.

    1877
    The lowest total in first-class history. Oxford University were sent tumbling for just 12 by MCC at Oxford, a nadir that was replicated by Northants 30 years later. There was one crucial difference, though: Northants had a full complement of batsmen, Oxford had one missing.

    1988
    England 3 West Indies 0. It doesn't happen too often, but on this day England completed their very own Caribbean one-day whitewash. It wasn't exactly payback time for the Test blackwashes of 1984 and 1986 - or consolation for the 0-4 thumping England would get in the Test series that followed - but it was still pretty impressive nonetheless. In this Lord's match West Indies stuttered lamely to 178 for 7 - Desmond Haynes made 10 off 50 balls and Richie Richardson 13 off 46; even Neal Radford had figures of 11-2-29-0 - and England breezed home with five overs and seven wickets to spare.

    1900
    Johnny Briggs took 10 for 55 in an innings against Worcestershire at Old Trafford on this day. Worcestershire were bowled out for 106 and Briggs scored 33 in Lancashire's reply before taking two more in the second innings. Lancashire won by five wickets.

    1923
    A day for ten-fors, as Harry Howell became the first Warwickshire bowler to take the perfect ten when he skittled out Yorkshire single-handed at Edgbaston, finishing with 10 for 51.

    1969
    Birth of the rat who joined a sinking ship. That's what the Australian newspapers called Martin McCague - who was born in Ulster and raised in Australia - when he made his debut for England against Australia at Trent Bridge in 1993. McCague became a bit of a watchword for incompetence, especially after his nervy horror show in Brisbane in 1994-95, but it's easy to forget just how well he bowled on his debut. He suffered from injury, and he was spanked all round Headingley on his second outing, and his next, and last, Test was that Brisbane shocker 18 months later.

    1927
    The end of an era. Yorkshire lost by eight wickets to Warwickshire at Hull, their first defeat in the County Championship for a record 71 matches and almost three years.

    Other birthdays
    1895 Stork Hendry (Australia)
    1917 Ruby Monaghan (Australia)
    1926 Len Maddocks (Australia)
    1933 Bal Dani (India)
    1938 Glen Hall (South Africa)
    1956 Ijaz Faqih (Pakistan)
    1965 Rajdeep Sardesai (India)
    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    May 25 down the years


    2007
    The first instance in Tests of the top four scoring centuries in an innings - and, by a strange quirk, of the top four coming close to breaking the record for the first wicket. Wasim Jaffer and Dinesh Karthik added 175 on day one of the second Test against Bangladesh in Dhaka before Karthik retired hurt with cramps. Then at 281, still without the loss of a wicket, Jaffer was also taken off with cramps, and Rahul Dravid and Sachin Tendulkar batted till stumps for 326 for 0. On day two Dravid fell, India's first wicket, when they needed six runs to break the opening-stand record of 413 set by Pankaj Roy and Vinoo Mankad. Karthik returned to get his maiden century.

    2015
    England pulled off hard-fought win against New Zealand at Lord's. The Test, the first of two in the series, followed England's first-round exit at the 2015 World Cup, Peter Moores being sacked for a second time as coach, and much commotion over Kevin Pietersen's continued exile. New Zealand, coming off a stirring march to the World Cup final, proceeded to reduce England to 30 for 4 after choosing to bowl. England recovered to 389, but the visitors, led by a century from Kane Williamson, piled up 523. The tables were turned, though, on a fabulous day four, as the under-fire captain, Alastair Cook, focused intensely for 162 and Ben Stokes smoked England's second-fastest Test hundred. On the final day and, after a bit of stubborn defiance from Williamson and BJ Watling, Stokes produced another key play with two wickets in two balls, helping England seal a memorable win.

    1970
    Early in his Test career, Robert Croft, who was born in Morriston, Wales, today, looked the part. On his first tour, in 1996-97, he took 18 wickets in four Tests in Zimbabwe and New Zealand, including a match-winning hand in Christchurch. But in 1997, Australian batsmen, Greg Blewett excepted, nullified him completely, and Glenn McGrath reduced his once-useful lower-order batting to a quivering mess. Croft returned to save a Test with the bat against South Africa at Old Trafford in 1998, and helped win the series in Sri Lanka in 2000-01. But he slipped down the pecking order after deciding not to tour India in 2001-02, and never really regained the selectors' confidence.

    1897
    Birth of the brilliant New South Wales batsman Alan Kippax, who played 22 Tests for Australia. He was a glorious strokemaker who specialised in the late cut, and he made two Test centuries, an even 100 against England at the MCG in 1928-29, and 146 in West Indies' first Test against Australia, at Adelaide in 1930-31. In 61 Sheffield Shield matches for NSW he cracked 6096 runs at an average of over 70. That included the highest tenth-wicket partnership in first-class history: against Queensland in Sydney in 1927-28, Kippax and Hal Hooker added 307 in only five hours. Kippax made 240 of them. He died in his native Sydney in 1972.

    1990
    Who said Devon Malcolm sprayed it all over the place? At The Oval on this day he had a storming one-day international debut as England beat New Zealand by six wickets and took the Texaco Trophy on run rate. Malcolm's figures - 11-5-19-2, in an otherwise high-scoring game, included 28 consecutive scoreless deliveries to his old Derbyshire team-mate John Wright. Malcolm wasn't trusted at the best of times, though, let alone in the one-day arena, and he only played ten ODIs.

    1936
    An unsung hero is born. Rusi Surti made no Test centuries and took only one five-for, but he was a useful allrounder who played 26 Tests for India in the 1960s. He was an aggressive left-handed batsman who batted as high as No. 2 and as low as No. 10. His highest score was a tantalising 99 - during which he was missed twice on 99 and then caught off Gary Bartlett - against New Zealand in Auckland in 1967-68. Surti flitted between medium pace and slow left-arm, and though he sometimes struggled to penetrate, he did take 5 for 74 against Australia in Adelaide in 1967-68. He died at the age of 76 in Mumbai after suffering a massive stroke.

    1868
    The first Australian team ever to visit England began their first match, against Surrey Gentlemen. The Australian side were led by Charles Lawrence, who had earlier played for both Surrey and Middlesex. Surrey won by an innings and 7 runs, or - as the Wisden Cricketers' Almanack of 1869 recorded it - "in one innings by 7 runs".

    1985
    A fourth consecutive first-class hundred for Allan Border in Australia's tour match at Derbyshire. He started his trip with centuries against Somerset, Worcestershire and MCC, and though he continued his sensational run - Border top-scored in the first two one-day internationals that followed this match, and made a match-winning 196 at Lord's - it was a humbling tour for the Aussies, who surrendered the Ashes with a 3-1 defeat.
    Other birthdays

    1874 Lebrun Constantine (West Indies)
    1949 Lalith Kaluperama (Sri Lanka)
    1957 Peter Rawson (Zimbabwe)
    1962 Zulqarnain (Pakistan)
    1965 Sue Metcalfe (England)
    1995 Kagiso Rabada (South Africa)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    The hard-nosed Kiwi
    The New Zealander who averaged 66 against West Indies
    Glenn Turner: New Zealand's run machine

    1947
    Birth of one of New Zealand's finest batsmen. Glenn Turner combined a hard-nosed mental toughness with a textbook technique and an increasingly extensive array of strokes to mould himself into a formidable opening batsman. He added 387 with Terry Jarvis in Guyana in 1971-72, the fourth-highest opening partnership in Test history. Turner went on to make a massive 259, one of four double-centuries he scored on that tour, two in the Tests and two in tour matches. In all he averaged 65.77 in Tests against West Indies. He also became the first New Zealander to score two hundreds in a Test, in Christchurch in 1973-74, when New Zealand beat Australia for the first time. Turner was an outstanding servant for Worcestershire, but his most famous achievement in England came as a New Zealand tourist: in 1973 he became the first person to score 1000 runs by the end of May for 35 years.

    1976
    Before he became the man who led England to their first win in an ICC world event, Paul Collingwood, born today, was a determined batsman and excellent limited-overs fielder. He made his one-day debut in 2001 but seemed destined to be a fill-in player till 2006, when he struck 96 and 80 in Lahore, before hitting a brilliant maiden Test century in Nagpur . On the following Ashes tour Collingwood was the rock of England's batting - his double-century in Adelaide came in one of their most crushing defeats. He was made the one-day captain in 2007 and in 2010 led England to the World T20 title. He retired from Test cricket at the end of England's historic victorious Ashes campaign in 2010-11. But when his poor Ashes form transferred on to the World Cup, he was dropped from the one-day and T20 squads as well

    1999
    Sourav Ganguly and Rahul Dravid added a monstrous 318 for the second wicket in Taunton as India sounded the death knell for Sri Lanka's defence of the World Cup. Ganguly creamed 183 off 158 balls and Dravid 145 off 129. At the time it was a one-day record for any wicket, but it has since been broken.

    1868
    EFS Tylecote became the first man to pass 400 runs in an innings, scoring 404 over three afternoons for Classical Side against Modern Side played on three afternoons at Clifton College. Thirty-one years later the college was the venue when AEJ Collins scored 628.
    (DHANWADE (Mumbai's Harris shield) in 2016, hits 1000 plus to break Collins records after 113 years)

    1988
    The birth of Sunil Narine, an offspinner who reworked his action to turn into a potent force, especially in ODIs and T20. He tasted tremendous success in the 2011 Champions League, with ten wickets at 10.50. An injury to Kemar Roach meant Narine was included for the third and final Test against England in June 2012. But he has struggled to cement his spot in the longer version, managing only 21 wickets in six Tests. In October 2014, while turning out for Knight Riders in the Champions League T20, his action was reported twice, and he was banned from bowling in the final. He withdrew from the the 2015 World Cup to work on his action and returned, only to be suspended again in November that year. Narine made a third comeback in the 2016 IPL.

    1995
    Everyone thought England had picked the wrong Lancastrian when Peter "Digger" Martin was called up for the one-day series against West Indies. Glenn Chapple had just had a barnstorming A tour of India; Martin had never been on an A tour, but he got the nod and he grasped the nettle by bowling England to victory on this day at The Oval. Martin had a sensational start, taking 3 for 6 off his first four overs, including Brian Lara bowled neck and crop. He ended with 4 for 44, the Man-of-the-Match award, and a Test debut two weeks later.

    1948
    Birth of the last white man before Brendan Nash to play for West Indies. The opener Geoff Greenidge, who like his namesake Gordon was born in Barbados, was the author of one of the most amazing debuts in cricket history. In his first first-class match, for Barbados against Jamaica in Bridgetown in 1966-67, he cracked 205 and then took 7 for 124 in the first innings with his occasional legspinners. Both remained career bests: Greenidge took only six more wickets in 181 matches over the next ten years. His Test career was modest: he played five times but never topped his debut 50, against New Zealand in Guyana in 1971-72. Greenidge also played for Sussex.

    1920
    A South African captain is born. Jack Cheetham was in charge when South Africa, famously and totally unexpectedly, pulled off a surprise 2-2 draw in Australia in 1952-53. He was an assertive middle-order batsman who made five Test fifties without ever reaching three figures. He was also captain in England in 1955, when South Africa came from 2-0 down to draw 2-2. Cheetham did not play in either victory because of injury, but he remained an inspiration to the side. He died in Johannesburg in 1980.

    1990
    Birth of the youngest, and arguably most talented, Akmal brother. When he scored a century on Test debut in Dunedin in 2009, it was thought Pakistan had found the heir to Mohammad Yousuf. And Umar Akmal didn't disappoint, also scoring a half-century in the second innings, and three more in his next three Tests. But he was a casualty of the disastrous tour of Australia that followed: he was fined along with his brother Kamran on disciplinary grounds. He kept his place for the tour to England in 2010, and made a fifty in the tainted Lord's Test, but had an ordinary series otherwise. While he hasn't quite lived up to his promise at the Test level but he is integral to Pakistan's plans in the shorter formats.


    1921
    Birth of the New Zealand wicketkeeper Frank Mooney, who was nicknamed "Starlight" because of his active social life and twinkling toes. That was in complete contrast to his on-field persona; Mooney was a crisp, undemonstrative keeper. He played 14 Tests but never managed more than the 46 he made in his first Test innings, at Headingley in 1949. He died in Wellington in March 2004.

    1920
    Arthur Denton played his first match in almost five years for Northamptonshire. Nothing odd there, except he had lost part of one leg in the interim while serving in the Great War. Denton played three times with his disability, scoring 119 runs at 23.80.

    1977
    Avishka Gunawardene, born today, hit the headlines in 1999 when he put on 145 in 20 overs with Romesh Kaluwitharana as Sri Lanka tried to chase Australia's 310 in Melbourne. He scored a career-best 132 against West Indies in the ICC Knockout in 2000. But a regular berth proved elusive and in 2007, Gunawardene joined the ICL, effectively ending his international career.

    1884
    Louis Stricker, born today, played as an opening bat for Transvaal and took part in 13 Tests for South Africa against England and Australia between 1909 and 1912, but he failed to reach fifty in any of them. For Transvaal against HDG Leveson-Gower's MCC team in 1910 he (101) and JW Zulch (176) scored 215 together in two hours and 20 minutes, which then constituted a record for the first wicket against a touring side in South Africa.

    2013
    A 32-ball 60 from Kieron Pollard and an aggressive showing on the field helped Mumbai Indians clinch their first IPL title in six attempts. They overcame five-time finalists Chennai Super Kings in the final in Kolkata, bringing an end to a tournament beset with spot-fixing and betting scandals.

    1979
    Malinda Warnapura, the nephew of Sri Lanka's first Test captain Bandula, is born in Colombo. A left-hand opener who took about eight years to make a serious mark, Malinda earned a Test debut against Bangladesh in 2007. He was dismissed for a first-ball duck in his first dig but followed up with an 82 in the second innings. He had a steady run in the Test side for about two years before a poor series against Pakistan, in 2009, put him out of favour.

    Other birthdays
    1868 Howard Francis (South Africa)
    1938 Liz Amos (Australia)
    1966 Grant Bradburn (New Zealand)
    1976 Helen Daly (New Zealand)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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    May 27 down the years

    Mahela makes his entrance
    The births of Jayawardene, Frank Woolley and Ravi Shastri

    1977
    Sri Lankan all-time great Mahela Jayawardene was born on this day. A prolific and elegant batsman with a huge appetite for runs, he made his debut at 20, coming to the crease at the unique position of 790 for 4, when Sri Lanka milked India for 952 for 6 in Colombo in 1997-98. He made his first eight centuries at home, and in 2006 became the second Sri Lankan after Sanath Jayasuriya to score a triple-century - in an epic third-wicket partnership of 624 with Kumar Sangakkara, the highest for any wicket in Tests. As a captain, he led Sri Lanka to Test wins in England and New Zealand, and to the World Cup final in 2007. In the 2011 World Cup, he became the sixth batsman to score a hundred in the final but the first to do so in a losing cause. He became the first Sri Lankan to score 10,000 Test runs, during the tour of South Africa in 2011-12, at the end of which he was reappointed captain. Jayawardene led Sri Lanka to the final of the 2012 World T20, where they were upstaged by West Indies. Things turned around two years later, when Sri Lanka took the 2014 World T20 title, and Jayawardene retired from the format on a high. He called it a day in all international cricket after the 2015 World Cup.

    1887
    A Kent legend is born. Frank Woolley was one of the greatest allrounders to have played the game - a magisterial, fleet-footed left-hander who was a natural timer of the ball, and a textbook slow left-armer whose height enabled him to get considerable bounce. He and WG Grace are the only men to score 50,000 runs and take 2000 wickets in first-class cricket. (Only Jack Hobbs has scored more than Woolley's 58,969 runs.) For good measure, Woolley is the only man to take 1000 catches, most of them at slip.

    1938
    Don Bradman scored his 1000th run of the season, the earliest date the landmark has been achieved, on his way to 145 not out against Hampshire. The previous record was May 28 by Wally Hammond a year earlier.

    1962
    Birth of a stonewaller. Indian allrounder Ravi Shastri batted ten hours for his Test-best of 206 at the SCG in 1991-92 in the match in which Shane Warne, on debut, took 1 for 150. Of batsmen who have played ten Test innings against Australia, only Eddie Paynter averages more than Shastri's 77.75. Shastri started off as a lower-order hitter but ended up as a defensive batsman at the top of the order. He was a useful one-day player and won the Man of Series in the 1985 World Championship of Cricket in Australia. The same year, he also equalled Gary Sobers' world record of six sixes in an over in a Ranji Trophy game. Shastri, who played his last Test aged just 30, went on to be a popular TV commentator and also served as India's director of cricket in the mid-2010s.

    1975
    The birth of Mr Cricket. Michael Hussey got his nickname after a meteoric rise early in his career. In just 166 days, he became the fastest player to 1000 Test runs - he scored three centuries in his first five Tests - and his average swelled to 86.18 at the end of two years. His form dropped in 2008-09 but he didn't lose his place despite tremendous pressure. And no Australian batsman performed better in a pressure situation - Hussey's unbeaten century in Sydney in 2010 against Pakistan helped Australia crawl back and win a Test that most had written off. He was also the only Australian batsman who had a good run in the 2010-11 Ashes. An accumulator in Tests, Hussey also became a finisher in limited-overs cricket. Most memorably, he took Australia into the World T20 final in 2010 with an unbeaten 24-ball 60, coming in at No. 7 with his side needing 87 off 45 balls in the semi-final against Pakistan.

    1878
    An amazing day's play at Lord's, where Australia beat MCC by nine wickets - in a match of only 105 runs, a record low for a completed first-class game. MCC made 33 and 19, Australia 41 (in 66.2 overs), and 12 for 1. Only three players made double figures, and there were no fewer than 16 ducks. Fred Spofforth took 6 for 4 in the first innings, Harry Boyle 6 for 3 in the second.

    2012
    After four years of underperformance, humiliations and sagas, Kolkata Knight Riders won their first IPL title by beating the defending champions, Chennai Super Kings, by five wickets. They won ten of their 16 league matches and then beat table-toppers Delhi Daredevils to make it to the final, where the virtually unheard of Manvinder Bisla opened in place of Brendon McCullum and added 136 with Jacques Kallis as the Knight Riders chased 191. Bisla's 48-ball 89 was only his fourth half-century in T20s.

    1991
    A dreamy Bank Holiday Monday at Lord's, as England completed their second consecutive home one-day whitewash of West Indies. They had Neil Fairbrother and Graeme Hick to thank. Fairbrother cracked and scampered a marvellous century, adding 213 with Hick. The time looked right for Fairbrother, but a week later England announced their Test squad with Mark Ramprakash in his stead. For Hick it was a bit of a false dawn too: he made fewer runs in four Tests that summer (75) than he did in this innings (86 not out), as Curtly Ambrose flexed his muscles irresistibly.

    1999
    The ultimate World Cup mismatch at Leicester. Scotland against West Indies was never likely to detain anyone for too long, and so it proved. Curtly Ambrose (10-4-8-2) and Courtney Walsh (7-1-7-3) helped themselves, and Scotland were routed for 68. The only Scotsmen who reached double figures were Gavin Hamilton (who later played for England) and Asim Butt (who was born in Lahore). West Indies polished off the target in 10.1 overs; at the time it was the shortest game in one-day international history.

    1852
    Birth of an English seamer with a Test bowling average of 15. Billy Barnes was also a hugely talented batsman, who smacked a match-winning 134 in the first Test, in Adelaide in 1884-85. In the next Test of that series, in Melbourne, he bowled England to a 2-0 lead with second-innings figures of 38.3-26-31-6. In Sydney two years later he did likewise - 6 for 28 off 46 (four-ball) overs, a match in which England were skittled for 45 on the first morning and still won. Legend has it that Barnes once made a match-saving century for Nottinghamshire after having more than one shandy too many.

    1989
    Only the second tie in one-day history, at Trent Bridge, and England's first. Ian Healy at the non-striker's end scampered a bye when Carl Rackemann missed the last ball of the match, from Phil DeFreitas. It was fitting that Healy should square things up: he earlier outran his runner Dean Jones, who was promptly invited to leave the field by England's captain David Gower.

    1892
    An England captain is born. The Hon. Freddie Calthorpe led England in all four of his Test appearances, in the West Indies in 1929-30. In what was supposed to be a timeless, deciding Test in Jamaica - it was eventually abandoned as a draw when the last two days before England's scheduled trip home were washed out - he failed to enforce the follow-on after West Indies replied to England's 849 with 286. As a result the series was drawn. He was a dashing batsman and a wobbly medium-pacer who captained Warwickshire between 1920 and 1929. Calthorpe was only 43 when he died in Worplesdon, Surrey, in 1935.

    1996
    Ali Brown answered his critics with a match-winning hundred for England against India at Old Trafford, four days after he had been called a "clown" in the press after a scratchy debut innings. Brown's 118 gave England a 2-0 series win, but is the only century of a 16-match one-day career that never delivered on his lusty county promise.

    1960
    Sri Lankan medium-pacer Vinothen John, born today, played six Tests and 45 ODIs between 1983 and 1987. He took 5 for 60 in his second Test, in Wellington, and 5 for 86 in his third, in Kandy (8 for 159 overall), but did little thereafter. In one-dayers he averaged 48.67 with an economy rate of 4.29.

    Other birthdays
    1863 Arthur Mold (England)
    1863 Charles Wright (England)
    1870 Lionel Palairet (England)
    1899 George Parker (South Africa)
    1926 Gordon Leggat (New Zealand)
    1955 Jock Edwards (New Zealand)
    1957 Judith Laing (Australia)
    1974 Paula Flannery (New Zealand)
    1983 Oliver Pitcher (Bermuda)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

  15. #30
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    Default may 28

    May 28 down the years


    Pakistan's crisis man
    Misbah-ul-Haq is born
    Misbah-ul-Haq equalled Viv Richards' record for the fastest century, off 56 balls

    1974
    Though Misbah-ul-Haq, born today, made his Test debut in 2001, it was only in 2007 that he became a regular member of the Pakistan side in all three formats. He starred in the World T20 that year, after getting an unexpected call-up ahead of Mohammad Yousuf, and nearly took Pakistan to victory in the final. He did little in the series that followed, against South Africa, but made 464 runs in three Tests in India. He rescued Pakistan several times with some spirited rearguard efforts and was made the team vice-captain in 2008. In 2011, after the World Cup, Misbah replaced Shahid Afridi as captain, and led the side to Test victories over Sri Lanka and England, who were whitewashed 3-0. However, a few months before the 2012 World T20, he stepped down as captain from the format as Pakistan looked to build a younger side. In 2014 against Australia, in a series in the UAE where Pakistan whitewashed the visitors 2-0, he smashed a Test hundred off only 56 balls, equalling Viv Richards' record for the fastest century. He quit ODIs after the 2015 World Cup but remained the Test captain.

    1956
    In Kingston, one of the greatest wicketkeeper-batsmen of them all is born. Jeff Dujon was a wonderfully athletic keeper, and an exhilarating sight standing back to the West Indian pace battery of the 1980s. He was good enough to play his first two Tests as a specialist batsman, and to open in one Test in England in 1988, and to make 3322 Test runs in all.

    1912
    Two Test hat-tricks in one day for Australian legspinner Jimmy Matthews. Unsurprisingly, it's a unique feat, but what's even more amazing is that Matthews didn't need the help of any fielders: two of the six were bowled, two lbw, and two caught-and-bowled. This came in the first match of the Triangular Tournament - a nine-Test series that also involved England - as Australia routed South Africa by an innings and 88 runs at Old Trafford. Bizarrely, Matthews never played after that tournament.


    1988
    Graeme Hick rumbled along to seemingly inexorable greatness, as he became only the second man since the war (New Zealand's Glenn Turner was the other) to make 1000 first-class runs in England by the end of May. And he did it against West Indies too, punishing his future torturers Curtly Ambrose and Courtney Walsh in a blistering 172. The milestone came up when he reached 153. It's richly ironic that Ambrose was the bowler, such was the devastating impact he would later have on Hick's career.

    1934
    Nobody, not even Hick, has scored more than the great Jack Hobbs' 199 first-class centuries, and on this day at Old Trafford he made his last, for Surrey against Lancashire, at the age of 51 years and 163 days.

    1977
    Birth of Ashwell Prince, who made it to the South African squad because of the controversial quota system, but quickly justified his place with a fighting 49 against Australia in 2001-02. In 2005, he made his first century, against Zimbabwe in Centurion, and a month later he got an overseas hundred in the West Indies. In early 2006, Prince got his first hundred in Australia but struggled against Shane Warne during the series. In July 2006 he was named South Africa's first black captain in the absence of the injured Graeme Smith. Though South Africa lost the series, Prince remained in excellent form through the year - two half-centuries in Sri Lanka and 97 and 121 against India. His 149 at Headingley in 2008 came in a ten-wicket win for South Africa and his 150 against Australia in Cape Town in 2009 came in an innings win. Prince played his last Test in 2011 and announced his retirement from international cricket three years later.

    2011
    A lot had changed in the IPL's fourth season - the number of teams, the players, the format - but the name remained the same on the winner's trophy. This time, Chennai Super Kings beat Royal Challengers Bangalore - who were making their second appearance in the final - in a one-sided match in front of their home crowd. M Vijay's blistering 95 set up the game, and he and Michael Hussey scored more than two-thirds of Chennai's 205. With Chris Gayle, the tournament's top run-getter, in their side, Bangalore's fans might have expected a thrilling chase, but their title hopes ended when he was dismissed for a duck in the first over.

    1880
    A record 39 wickets fell on the first day of the match between Oxford University and MCC at the Old Magdalen ground in Oxford. Alfred Shaw took 12 for 53 for MCC and then contributed to a last-wicket stand of 18 as MCC crawled past their target of 40 with one wicket to spare.

    1908
    George Hirst was the destroyer as Yorkshire bowled Nottinghamshire out twice in a day for 17 and 15. Hirst took 12 for 19 as Yorkshire won by an innings and 341 runs.

    1965
    A drinks break with a difference. It was so cold in the first Test between England and New Zealand at Edgbaston that hot coffee was twice served to the batsmen on this, the second day. The caffeine didn't do much for Ken Barrington, who was stuck on 85 for 20 overs, made 137 in over seven hours, and was dropped for the next Test for slow batting, even though his innings anchored England's nine-wicket win. Wisden noted that "seldom in England has a Test been contested in such cold, cheerless weather".

    1911
    Birth of the South African quickie Bob Crisp, who played nine Tests in the 1930s - and is the only man to twice take four wickets in four balls in first-class cricket - but was better known for his off-field exploits. He climbed Kilimanjaro twice in two weeks, was wounded five times as a tank commander in the Western Desert, was awarded the MC, and also wrote for the Daily Express, and founded the magazine Drum. Crisp died in Colchester in 1994.
    Other birthdays

    1853 Hamilton Hamilton (England)
    1864 Basil Grieve (England)
    1929 Leslie Wight (West Indies)
    1949 Jacqueline Wainwright (England)
    1966 Gavin Robertson (Australia)
    1968 Shakeel Khan (Pakistan)
    1969 Rajani Venugopal (India)
    1972 Barbara McDonald (Ireland)
    1972 Jacob-Jan Esmeijer (Netherlands)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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