Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 111

Thread: Classic down memory lane : History of cricket

  1. #31
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    986
    Rep Power
    0

    Default May 29

    May 29 down the years

    A thrilling finish to a series decider in Antigua
    Wavell Hinds top scored in West Indies' chase, which ended in a one-wicket win.

    2000
    West Indies needed 216 to beat Pakistan in Antigua, but looked dead in the water at 197 for 9 as Courtney Walsh strode out swinging his arms. But his captain, Jimmy Adams, was still there, and drip by drip (Adams' 48 not out came in almost six hours, with not a single boundary) they saw West Indies to the ninth one-wicket win in Test history. It shouldn't have been so: replays showed Walsh was caught via bat and pad off Saqlain Mushtaq, who then missed two clear run-out chances, one of them a sitter when Adams and Walsh ended up at the same end. Wasim Akram, who had put the burgeoning match-fixing scandal aside to bowl heroically for figures of 11 for 110, was the unluckiest of losers.

    1902
    The beginning of the inaugural Test at Edgbaston, and England picked an XI who all had first-class centuries to their name. It was also, according to some very good judges, including Frank Keating, the greatest team they have ever picked: Archie MacLaren, CB Fry, Ranji, FS Jackson, Johnny Tyldesley, **** Lilley, George Hirst, Gilbert Jessop, Len Braund, Bill Lockwood and Wilfred Rhodes. Rhodes - a man who scored almost 40,000 first-class runs - was some No. 11. He made 38 not out, and with Tyldesley cracking 138, England made 376 for 9 declared. That was worth plenty more on a pitch so poor that Australia were then skittled for 36, their lowest Test score. Rhodes took 7 for 17, but as England moved in for a quick second-innings kill, rain ruined the last day and the match was drawn.

    1999
    Having already qualified for the Super Six stage by demolishing all comers, South Africa were probably not overly concerned when they lost their final group game against Zimbabwe in Chelmsford. But the repercussions were considerable: as well as knocking England out, it meant that South Africa carried two fewer points to the Super Six stage. With those two points, they would have finished above Australia in the Super Sixes and things might have turned out quite different.

    1950
    But for his namesake Deryck, David Murray, the West Indian keeper, who was born today, would surely have played many more than 19 Tests. He was talented behind the wicket and a capable batsman who made three Test fifties and a first-class double hundred, in Jamshedpur on the 1978-79 tour of India. He took over from Deryck Murray - they were not related - in 1980-81, and was briefly No. 1, but he was banned from playing cricket in the West Indies after he went on a rebel tour to South Africa, and his last Test appearance came in Sydney in 1981-82.

    2016
    A maiden IPL title for Sunrisers Hyderabad, who beat Royal Challengers Bangalore at the Chinnaswamy Stadium. Sunrisers were led from the front by David Warner, who finished with 848 runs in the tournament, and their bowlers - in particular Mustafizur Rahman and Bhuvneshwar Kumar - were stellar as well. Royal Challengers' path to the final was more dramatic, after they won only two of their first seven matches, and that they got there was thanks in large part to Virat Kohli, who scored a record four centuries in the season. But in the end it was Sunrisers who emerged victorious in a match in which over 400 runs were scored. Ben Cutting's tail-end 15-ball 39 was to prove vital.


    1950
    Talat Ali, who was born today, played ten Tests for Pakistan in the 1970s, but he is better known as a match referee. Talat was a dogged opener who got his Test career off to a traumatic start when he fractured his thumb on debut, facing Dennis Lillee in Adelaide in 1972-73. Pakistan won only one of his ten matches, when he made 40 and a Test-best 61 in Christchurch in 1978-79.

    1839
    Birth of the first man to be dismissed in a Test. Australian allrounder Nat Thomson was bowled by Yorkshire's Allen Hill for 1 at the MCG in the inaugural Test in 1876-77, but within three weeks his Test career was over. Thomson was dropped after the second Test, despite having made 41 in the second innings of a match where no Australian reached 50. He died in his native Sydney in 1896.

    1839
    On the same day that Thomson was born, so was Edward James "Ned" Gregory. He also played in that first Test, and became the first batsman to fall for a duck in a Test. It was his only appearance. His son Syd, who was born on the site of the SCG, later captained Australia. Ned was curator at the SCG for 30 years, where he died in 1899.


    Other birthdays
    1953 Rangy Nanan (West Indies)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

  2. #32
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    986
    Rep Power
    0

    Default May 30

    May 30 down the years

    The Black Bradman
    The first man to score two centuries in a Lord's Test
    George Headley's average in Tests West Indies won: 95

    1909
    In Panama, The Black Bradman is born. Sachin Tendulkar's devotees might say otherwise, but most older people agree that George Headley was second only to the Don. Even though West Indies won only five of his 22 Tests, Headley averaged in excess of 60. And in those five victories, his average was a Bradmanesque 95. That included two centuries in West Indies' first-ever victory, against England in Guyana in 1929-30, and a mighty 270 not out, also against England, in Jamaica in 1934-35. In 1939 he became the first person to score two centuries in a Lord's Test.

    1895
    A remarkable achievement by the 47-year-old WG Grace, who became the first man to score 1000 runs before the end of May. In fact, he reached the landmark in only 22 days and in six matches. He did not start until May 9 but then recorded scores of 13, 103 not out, 18, 25, 52, 288, 18, 257, 73 not out and 169.

    2016
    Alastair Cook became the first Englishman to make 10,000 Test runs, and the youngest at 31 years and 157 days, when he hit the milestone in Chester-le-Street against Sri Lanka. Cook had started the Test, his 128th, on 9980 runs and fell for 15 in the first innings. After Sri Lanka's fightback in the follow-on, led by Dinesh Chandimal's century, England needed 79 to win on day four. Cook made 47 of those, reaching the landmark with a clip off his pads off the bowling of Nuwan Pradeep.

    1949
    He may have taken 325 Test wickets and captained England, but the career of Bob Willis, who was born today, will be best remembered for one immortal spell at Headingley in 1981. Willis played 90 Tests in all - 18 as captain. Peculiarly, he took 16 five-fors but no ten-fors. After operations on both knees in 1975, when he was 26, he seldom bowled without pain. Yet through sheer willpower he sustained his career for nine more years. On retirement he moved into the media and is a commentator and studio expert with Sky Sports.

    1983
    A fairly dull County Championship match was unfolding at Chelmsford as Surrey dismissed Essex for 287. Then, unbelievably, Surrey were skittled for 14. It could have been worse: Surrey were 8 for 8 - they had been 8 for 3, but Nos. 3 to 8 all made ducks - before Sylvester Clarke biffed a boundary. Norbert Phillip took 6 for 4 and Neil Foster 4 for 10, and it remains the only sub-20 total in county cricket since the Second World War. It was swing that did it. There was nothing wrong with the pitch, as Surrey's captain Roger Knight proved the next day with a match-saving century.

    2011
    In an astonishing end to the rain-hit Cardiff Test, England beat Sri Lanka by an innings and 14 runs. On the first four days, during which Prasanna Jayawardene, Alastair Cook and Ian Bell made hundreds and Jonathan Trott his second double-century, a draw seemed the only possible result. Two overs into the final day - the start of which was delayed to 3pm - Andrew Strauss declared 96 runs ahead. Then in 24.4 overs Chris Tremlett and Graeme Swann triggered a collapse, helped by a panicky Sri Lankan line-up. England didn't even miss James Anderson, who was unable to bowl due to a side strain, as Tremlett and Swann took eight, leaving the final two wickets for Stuart Broad. This was Sri Lanka's first overseas tour since Muttiah Muralitharan had retired, and also their first since Tillakaratne Dilshan officially took over from Kumar Sangakkara.

    1983
    Sri Lanka fast bowler Dhammika Prasad, born today, started as a No. 3 batsman, but when 17 had to switch when his school, De Mazenod College, could not find a suitable new-ball bowler. The move seemed to suit him fine as he made it to the Under-19 World Cup, and won a scholarship to play in England. He debuted for Sri Lanka in an ODI in 2006, against Bangladesh in Chittagong, and was on a hat-trick in his first over. The highlight of his career came in June 2014, in Leeds, when he claimed a second-innings five-for to help Sri Lanka beat England by 100 runs and seal their first Test series win in the country.

    1887
    Sir Francis Lacey scored 323 not out for Hampshire against Norfolk in Southampton, the highest score in a Minor County match (Hampshire did not become a first-class county until 1895).

    1999
    The day England were asked to leave their own World Cup party. About 20 hours before the official World Cup song was released, England slid to a fatal 63-run defeat to India at Edgbaston. It was all thoroughly depressing, and England, who went out on run rate, were left to clutch only at a number of ifs: if Zimbabwe hadn't beaten a South African side that had, up to then, been irresistible; if England themselves hadn't dawdled in completing comfortable victories over Zimbabwe and Kenya; if Javed Akhtar hadn't triggered Graham Thorpe with one of the worst lbw decisions in history...

    1999
    On the same day, in the same competition, cricket lost a little bit of its innocence. Australia, and Steve Waugh in particular, staged a deliberate go-slow (12 runs in ten overs) at the conclusion of a comfortable six-wicket victory over West Indies at Old Trafford. It was designed to enable West Indies to get through at New Zealand's expense, on run rate. If that happened - it ultimately didn't - Australia would have taken two extra points to the Super Six stage, having beaten West Indies but lost to New Zealand. A forgettable and depressing match was at least memorable for one thing: the ball of the tournament from Glenn McGrath, an absolute jaffa to bowl Brian Lara.

    1879
    Birth of the great Colin Blythe, an artistic slow left-armer who used flight to lure batsmen to their doom. Despite suffering from epilepsy, he took 100 wickets in a season 14 times for Kent. His Test career got off to a slow start, but in his last ten appearances he took a Murali-esque 70 wickets at an average of 14, including 11 to beat the Australians at Edgbaston in 1909. He was killed in Belgium during the First World War.

    1895
    The Sussex allrounder Maurice "Chubby" Tate, who was born today, started life as an offspinner, but after ten years of modest success he repackaged himself as a quick bowler. The results were devastating. He made his Test debut two years later and had a storming start, with 65 wickets in his first ten matches. His Wisden obituary described him as "probably the first bowler to deliberately use the seam". He was also good enough with the bat to make a Test hundred, against South Africa at Lord's in 1929.

    Other birthdays
    1892 Ronald Stanyforth (England)
    1936 Roy Harford (New Zealand)
    1966 Ian Austin (England)
    1966 Gary Martin (Zimbabwe)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

  3. #33
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    986
    Rep Power
    0

    Default May 31

    May 31 down the years

    The greatest one-day knock of all
    Viv puts England to the sword
    Viv Richards' 189 came off 170 balls

    1984
    The greatest innings in one-day international history according to everyone who witnessed it. Viv Richards smeared England all round Old Trafford in the first Texaco Trophy match: his 189 came off only 170 balls, with 21 fours and five sixes. What makes the innings so great is its context: West Indies were 102 for 7 at one point, then 166 for 9. They ended up making 272 for 9, and won by 104 runs. Of the last-wicket partnership of 106, Michael Holding made 12. Eldine Baptiste was the only other West Indian even to reach double figures.

    2015
    First the floodlights failed, then a dust storm arrived, then it began to rain. And that's how what was shaping up to be an interesting chase from Zimbabwe ended in the last of three ODIs in the first one-day series on Pakistani soil in six years. Ninth-ranked Pakistan took the series 2-0 against 11th-ranked Zimbabwe, the washout denying them the chance at the 3-0 result they were chasing to gain vital rating points in a bid to catch up to Bangladesh and secure a place in the top-eight-only 2017 Champions Trophy (September 2015 cut-off). That even half of the match took place would have been a big relief for the hosts, though, given the suicide bomb that went off, killing two people, near the Gaddafi Stadium during the second ODI. Zimbabwe were the first Full Member to tour the country since the terrorist attack directed at the Sri Lankan team in March 2009.

    1999
    Eyebrows were raised as Pakistan lost to Bangladesh in an amazing World Cup match at Northampton. In Wisden Cricket Monthly, Kamran Abbasi wrote that "Pakistan lost their heads in a flurry of poor strokes and worse running," but it wasn't long before the accusations started flying, most notably from Saleem Malik, who played in the match and said it was rigged.

    1973
    At Northampton, New Zealand's Glenn Turner became the first man since the Second World War to score 1000 first-class runs by the end of May. But if anything, Turner peaked too early: in the Tests his scores were 11, 9, 4, 11 and 81.

    1815
    The first first-class game at the third and final home of Thomas Lord's ground. After moving from Dorset Square and a site that's now under the Regent's Canal, Lord's came to rest at its present spot in St John's Wood. The notoriously poor wicket was already a feature - the game saw 40 wickets fall for 210 runs. Middlesex beat MCC by 16 runs.

    1928
    Birth of one half of what was the biggest opening partnership in Tests for over 50 years. Against New Zealand on a Madras shirt-front in 1955-56, India's Pankaj Roy added 413 in 472 minutes with Vinoo Mankad (231), and made a Test-best 173. He was less accomplished when the ball jagged around, though: in nine Tests in England he averaged 13, thanks mainly to five ducks in six innings when Fred Trueman terrorised him in 1952. He captained India just once, at Lord's in 1959, when he made another duck. His son Pranab also played Test cricket for India. Pankaj died in his native Kolkata in 2001.

    1950
    At a Test trial in his hometown of Bradford, Jim Laker returned the astonishing figures of 14-12-2-8 as England bowled The Rest out for 27. Of the two runs he conceded, one was a gentle single off the mark for his Surrey team-mate Eric Bedser. Laker, not entirely surprisingly, was selected, but was then dropped after taking only one wicket in England's first-Test victory against West Indies.

    1924
    Birth of the first man to be given out "handled the ball" in a Test. South African Russell Endean made history when he palmed down a delivery from Jim Laker in Cape Town in 1956-57 that was spinning back towards his stumps. Ironically, Endean was involved in another unusual dismissal on his debut: at The Oval in 1951, when Len Hutton became the only man to be given out "obstructing the field" for preventing Endean from attempting a catch.

    1946
    Birth of the most experienced Test umpire. Steve Bucknor broke ****ie Bird's record in 2002, and in March 2005 became the first umpire to officiate in 100 Test matches. Bucknor also stood in a record five successive World Cup finals (1992-2007). His rise to international status was rapid - his appointment for the 1992 final followed just four Tests and a handful of one-day internationals. Though he was scheduled to retire in 2011, Bucknor was forced out two years early after some high-profile errors. He misinterpreted the bad-light rules, leading to a farcical end to the 2007 World Cup final in Barbados, and was removed by the ICC from officiating in the third Test between Australia and India in Perth after several contentious decisions contributed to India's defeat in the second Test in Sydney in January 2008. Bucknor also refereed in a football World Cup qualifier.

    1966
    A batting average of 29.27 from 52 Tests might suggest a modest career for the dashing Roshan Mahanama, who was born today, but there is one match he'll never forget. In Colombo in 1997-98, he added 576 for the second wicket with Sanath Jayasuriya, the second highest partnership in Test history. They were the first pair to bat through two full days' play of a Test, with Mahanama making 225 and Jayasuriya 340 as Sri Lanka ran up 952 for 6, another Test record. Apart from that, Mahanama often struggled to rein in his attacking instincts; his best years were between 1992 and 1994, when he made three centuries in six Tests.

    1926
    Birth of one of India's finest wicketkeepers. Khokhan Sen took over from Jenni Irani on the Australia tour of 1947-48 and impressed all by taking four catches and conceding just four byes in the hosts' 575 in Melbourne. He played in all five Tests against West Indies in 1948-49, and warded off competition from Nana Joshi and Madhav Mantri in the early '50s. Sen's finest moment came against England in 1951-52 in Madras, where he effected five stumpings - four in the first innings - off Vinoo Mankad's bowling as India took their first Test victory. Sen played four more Tests before being replaced by Mantri.

    1902
    Australia's lowest innings total was made today in Edgbaston. But luck was on their side, because despite being bowled out for 36 and then trailing by 340 runs, they managed to get a draw - only because of a downpour on the final day of this three-day game. They were bowled out in an hour and a half, with Victor Trumper's 70-minute 18 being the top score. Wilfred Rhodes took his then-best figures of 7 for 17 and Australia ended day two with their second innings on 8 for 0. It rained for 12 hours overnight and there was play on the third day only because spectators had been let in in the afternoon.

    1998
    A surprise win for New Zealand in the first Test against Sri Lanka in Colombo - and a surprise match-winner too. On his debut, Paul Wiseman outbowled Muttiah Muralitharan in the battle of the offies, taking 7 for 143 in the match as against Murali's 9 for 227. Thanks to Wiseman's second-innings five-for - and big, chalk-and-cheese centuries from Stephen Fleming and Craig McMillan - New Zealand won three Tests in a row for the first time.

    1976
    An obdurate left-hander and one of only three batsmen in Test history to make 99 on debut, Asim Kamal played 12 Tests for Pakistan in the mid-2000s. Kamal got his chance at the age of 27 and he held the middle order together in his early Tests. He consolidated his reputation during Pakistan's 2005 tour of India, scoring 91 in the first innings of the first Test in Mohali. His safe catching at gully came in handy. However, his consistency slipped in the following months and he was dropped at the end of 2005.

    Other birthdays
    1935 Bruce Bolton (New Zealand)
    1968 Teuntje de Boer (Netherlands)
    1980 Arundhati Kirkire (India)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

  4. #34
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    986
    Rep Power
    0

    Default june 1st

    June 1 down the years
    Cronje's violent end
    A tainted cricketer dies in a plane crash
    Hansie Cronje: South Africa's fallen captain

    2002
    At the age of 32, and just 26 months after his dramatic fall from grace, Hansie Cronje died in a plane crash near George, a town in South Africa's Western Cape. Cronje, who captained South Africa in 53 matches - and would surely have done so in many more - and two World Cups, shook the cricket world to its foundations in April 2000, when he admitted taking money from a bookmaker to influence the results of matches, and invited ridicule by blaming Satanic influences for his deception. But at the time of his death, in South Africa at least, he was beginning to win back public support despite this notorious lack of repentance. Away from cricket, he had been rebuilding his life as a financial manager for a Johannesburg company. More than 2000 mourners attended his funeral.

    1978
    The greatest day of Chris Old's career. Against Pakistan at Edgbaston, Old took 7 for 50, including four wickets in five balls. Agonisingly, this spell did not include a hat-trick: worse still, the two sets of two wickets sandwiched a no-ball. Old is one of only three men to achieve the feat in a Test (Maurice Allom and Wasim Akram are the others). Pakistan were blown away for 164, and England went on to win by an innings inside four days. This Test also marked the debut of David Gower, who Wisden said "played with the assurance of a Test veteran". Gower made another fifty in his second innings, a century in his fourth, and a double-century within a year.

    1985
    At Taunton, Viv Richards became the first West Indian to make 300 runs in a day. He creamed 322 against Warwickshire, back then the highest score in Somerset's history, and it was brutal stuff. Richards reached 300 off only 244 balls - he went from 100 to 300 in 130 deliveries - and in all, belted eight sixes and 42 fours. At the time it was the highest first-class score in England since 1949. Richards' record stood for 21 years, before Justin Langer scored 342 for Somerset against Surrey.

    1899
    The end of one great Test career... and the beginning of two others. WG Grace began the last of his 22 Tests at the age of 50 in England's draw against Australia at Trent Bridge. Grace made 28 and 1 and took no wickets, while two young debutants had mixed starts. For England, Wilfred Rhodes took seven wickets. For Australia, Victor Trumper began with a duck but went on to forge a reputation as one of their finest batsmen.

    1985
    Dinesh Karthik, born today, got his chance in the Indian squad when Parthiv Patel's form behind the stumps dropped drastically. On his one-day debut, at Lord's in 2004, Karthik caught the eye with a brilliant one-hand stumping to dismiss Michael Vaughan. A few months later he made his Test debut against Australia in Mumbai. But after managing just one fifty in ten Tests, he was axed in favour of the flamboyant MS Dhoni. He returned for India's tour of South Africa in 2006, scored his maiden Test ton in Dhaka in 2007, and was for a while considered a specialist Test opener. But once Dhoni became a fixture, Karthik retreated to the fringes. India preferred Wriddhiman Saha as the keeper after Dhoni's Test retirement, so Karthik had to be content with being a high-value player in the IPL for the next few seasons. He did earn an India recall for the 2017 Champions Trophy, though, replacing the injured Manish Pandey in the 15-player squad before the tournament began.

    2008
    The first Indian Premier League ended with a cliffhanger of a final. Rajasthan Royals, the tournament's most consistent side (and its most underrated) beat Chennai Super Kings off the final ball in Mumbai. Rajasthan needed 21 off 14 balls when their star batsman, Yusuf Pathan, was run out for a 39-ball 56. Their lead bowler, Sohail Tanvir, joined Shane Warne at the crease, and at the start of the final over Rajasthan needed eight off six balls. It came down to one off one. Tanvir pulled to short mid-on, by which time Warne had already scrambled halfway down the pitch.

    2014
    Six years later Kolkata Knight Riders won their second IPL title in a high-intensity match against Kings XI Punjab, who made it to their maiden final after six below-par seasons. Wriddhiman Saha's hundred - the first in an IPL final - set up a chase of 200, which Manish Pandey directed with an urgent but fluent 94 off 50 balls.

    1964
    Just one wicketless Test for Indian seamer Rashid Patel, who was born today, and is better known for an unsavoury incident during the Duleep Trophy final in Jamshedpur in 1990-91. After one sledging match too many, Patel chased Raman Lamba, the batsman, wielding a stump maniacally. He struck Lamba and was later banned for 14 months.

    1928
    Gloucestershire medium-pacer Percy Mills became the fourth bowler to take a first-class five-for without conceding a run when he ushered Somerset from 71 for 3 to 90 all out with a spell of 6.4-6-0-5 in Bristol, after which Gloucester breezed to a ten-wicket victory.

    1932
    Birth of Frank Cameron, the New Zealand seamer who played 19 Tests in the 1960s. He was successful too, taking three five-fors and averaging below 30. Cameron's finest display was against Pakistan in Auckland in 1964-65, when his match figures were 49-22-70-9. He was later chairman of selectors for New Zealand, as well as an umpire, and was awarded the MBE.

    1930
    Fourteen Tests for Matt Poore, who was born today, but his wasn't the most successful career. New Zealand won none of those games, and Poore never topped the 45 he made in his very first innings, against South Africa in Auckland in 1952-53.

    Other birthdays
    1919 Owen Wynne (South Africa)
    1933 Ian Sinclair (New Zealand)
    1943 Ian King (Australia)
    1949 Margaret Jennings (Australia)
    1963 Jenny Owens (Australia)
    1973 Shafiuddin Ahmed (Bangladesh)
    1976 Shahriar Hossain (Bangladesh)
    1979 Bindeshwari Goel (India)

    Resources
    :Espn.cricinfo.com

  5. #35
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    986
    Rep Power
    0

    Default june 2nd

    June 2 down the years
    Twin princely entrances
    The Waughs make their mark

    Mark and Steve: the first twins to play in a Test together

    1965
    A great few minutes for Australian cricket, as the Waugh brothers are born in the Sydney suburb of Bankstown. Steve, about four minutes older than Mark, made his Test debut five years before his brother lit up Adelaide with a dreamy 138 in 1990-91. Mark had been called up to replace Steve, but they eventually became the first twins to play in a Test together; in all they did it 108 times.

    1975
    With the inaugural World Cup looming, snow swept across England, causing widespread disruption and the abandonment of play in two County Championship matches, while several others were prematurely ended as players shivered in temperatures of around 50 Fahrenheit. A letter in the Times warned that we were entering a new ice age. Five days later the tournament began... in temperatures in the high 70s as spectators sweltered in the heat.

    1987
    Birth of Sri Lankan allrounder Angelo Mathews. Though mostly known for his batting, his first big impact was with the ball, when he blew India away with 6 for 19 in a one-dayer at the Premadasa. He was the driving force in the world-record stand of 132 for the ninth wicket with Lasith Malinga in the game against Australia that Sri Lanka won by one wicket at the MCG. Often coming to the crease at No. 6, Mathews provides solidity to the lower middle order and has played a part in some unforgettable finishes. In February 2013, he became Sri Lanka's youngest ever Test captain at 25. In June 2014, he led them to their first series victory in England - a 1-0 win in a two-match series, where Mathews scored hundreds in both Tests. But as Mahela Jayawardene and Kumar Sangakkara's careers came to a close, Sri Lanka struggled to establish their dominance under Mathews, even at home, losing Test series to India and Pakistan in 2015, and failing to defend their World T20 title in 2016.

    1989
    Steven Smith is born. Smith began as a legspinner who was handy with the bat but turned into a batsman capable of occupying a specialist slot. He made his Test debut against Pakistan in 2010 but lost his place after five matches. He returned two years later, on Australia's tour to India, and made the most of his chance with a composed 92 in Mohali. His first Test century came in the fifth Ashes Test of the 2013 series in England. His two hundreds in the home series against England played a big part in the whitewash. In the second game of the four-match 2014-15 home series against India, Smith was handed charge of the Test team in the absence of the injured Michael Clarke. Smith showed little sign of the added responsibility affecting his batting, making a century in each of the four Tests - the only batsman after Jacques Kallis to make a hundred in every Test of a series of four matches or more. He carried the form into the World Cup that followed, making 105 off 93 in the semi-final against India, before hitting the winning runs in the course of an unbeaten 56 in the final. He became Australia's full-time captain after the 2015 Ashes.

    1865
    Birth of one of the greatest bowlers of all time - George Lohmann. The statistics of his career are jaw-dropping: in 18 Tests he took 112 wickets at the average of 10.75. To put that in context: nobody else with 70 Test wickets has an average below 15. Lohmann took a wicket every 34 balls, and conceded just 1.88 runs per over. It was stealth and cunning that brought him his wickets rather than pace: he was little more than medium. In South Africa in 1895-96 he was utterly devastating, albeit against an extremely poor side. Lohmann took 35 wickets in three Tests at the average of 5.80. His strike rate was a wicket every 14 balls - just over two overs. It was in South Africa that he died of tuberculosis in 1901, aged only 36
    .
    2015
    At Headingley, Brendon McCullum's New Zealand completed a famous win to square the Test series against England 1-1. The 199-run victory was New Zealand's second largest in terms of runs in Test cricket, their first in the 21st century in England, and it kept them undefeated in a seventh straight Test series. At the heart of the victory was their bold new brand of cricket: they made 804 runs at almost five an over and won comfortably despite the weather taking almost a day out of the game. On the final day it was spin that sealed the deal for them: offspinner Mark Craig and part-timer Kane Williamson picked up three apiece on the visibly wearing surface.

    1908
    Birth of a man who went on to become the oldest living Test cricketer. New Zealand batsman Lindsay "Dad" Weir inherited the title when England's Alf Gover died in October 2001, and held it until his death in October 2003, aged 95. Weir played 11 Tests, none of which his side won, and top-scored with 74 not out against South Africa in Christchurch in 1931-32, an innings in which nobody else made more than 17
    .
    1971
    Opening bowler Martin Suji, born today, played in three World Cups and three ICC Trophy competitions for Kenya. His finest moment in international cricket came in the 2003 World Cup Super Six match against Zimbabwe. Suji took 3 for 19 to catapult his side into the semi-final. But he was forced to sit on the sidelines as Kenya's infighting led to them being isolated from international cricket, and when they did eventually return in 2006, a serious knee injury ended his international career.

    1973
    Birth of Jayantha Silva, the Sri Lankan left-arm spinner whose seven-Test career split into two distinct segments. Serve up Zimbabwean prey and he was lethal: in three Tests against them he took 16 wickets at an average of 10.12, including a couple of match-winning hands in Colombo in 1996-97. But in four Tests against India, Australia and Pakistan, Silva was plundered for four wickets at an average of 121.25.

    Other birthdays
    1917 Peggy Antonio (Australia)
    1929 June Bragger (England)
    1948 Trevor Jesty (England)
    1955 Gerald Peckover (Zimbabwe)
    1967 Clare O'Leary (Ireland)
    1967 Alan Rutherford (Ireland)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

  6. #36
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    986
    Rep Power
    0

    Default June 3rd saturday

    June 3 down the years
    Mr Whippy
    The 916-wicket man

    Wasim Akram: left-arm poetry in motion

    1966
    Birth of one of the greatest left-arm fast bowlers in history. Wasim Akram was at the top for almost 20 years, in which time his famous whippy action brought him a record 916 international wickets for Pakistan. In only his second Test, he took 10 for 128 in Dunedin in 1985. (He went one better on the 1994 tour, when he took 11 for 179 in Wellington.) He demolished England with two unforgettable deliveries, to Allan Lamb and Chris Lewis, in the World Cup final in Melbourne in 1992, each a definition of unplayable. For good measure, Akram and Waqar Younis - partners in crime but never great friends - then bowled England to defeat in the Test series that followed. Akram was also an attacking batsman lower down the order and had a double-century against Zimbabwe to prove his credentials. Chuck in the film-star good looks and he really did have it all. His great career, which also included sterling work for Lancashire, was tainted only by allegations of his involvement in the match-fixing scandal of the late 1990s.

    1928
    One of New Zealand's finest captains is born. John Reid was in charge for New Zealand's first three victories at Test level, but he was no Mike Brearley figure: Reid was well worth his place as his country's finest pre-Hadlee allrounder. His averages - 33 with bat and ball - are even more impressive given that New Zealand won only three of his 58 Tests. In the last of those wins, against South Africa in Port Elizabeth in 1961-62, Reid was heroic, with second-innings figures of 45-27-44-4, as New Zealand won a thriller by 40 runs to square the series. That was a landmark tour for Reid - he averaged 60 with the bat and 19 with the ball. A year later, batting for Wellington against Northern Districts, he whacked 15 sixes in his 296, a first-class record at the time. He later became an ICC match referee.

    1906
    Birth of Walter Robins, England's dynamic allrounder who played 16 Tests leading up to the Second World War, and was captain in his last three, against New Zealand in 1937. He made one Test century, against South Africa at Old Trafford in 1935, and two years later was one of the first legspinners to demolish West Indies, with 6 for 32 at Lord's, a ground on which he also took two first-class hat-tricks. He died in London in 1968.

    1971
    Many great players have had inauspicious Test debuts - Victor Trumper, Don Bradman, Martin Donnelly, Len Hutton, Graham Gooch, Michael Holding, Saeed Anwar, Shane Warne - and on this day Imran Khan kicked off his top-level career with 5 runs and 28 wicketless overs against England at Edgbaston.

    1976
    Thirty-four-year-old Mike Brearley was thrown to the West Indian wolves for his debut in the drawn first Test at Trent Bridge. Brearley spent the first two days watching Viv Richards belt 232... and then bagged a fourth-ball duck. His fellow new boy and former Middlesex colleague Larry Gomes, coming in at No. 7 for West Indies, also failed to score.

    2000
    The last international for Mohammad Azharuddin and Ajay Jadeja. While Azhar was dismissed for 1, Jadeja went on to top-score for his side with 93 off 103 balls. But a century by Mohammad Yousuf (then Yousuf Youhana) and Abdul Razzaq's 4 for 29 ensured Pakistan won the Asia Cup match by 44 runs, in Dhaka. In December that year Azhar was handed a life ban and Jadeja suspended for five years from all cricket-related activities by the BCCI over allegations of match-fixing.

    1960
    Birth of Carl Rackemann, Australia's burly, balding fast bowler. He played 12 Tests and had a storming start with 11 wickets to demolish Pakistan on a Perth flyer in 1983-84. Rackemann liked Perth - against New Zealand there in 1989-90, he returned amazing second-innings figures of 31-21-23-1. His career at the top level was limited by injury and the decision to go on the 1985-86 rebel tour of South Africa.

    1961
    Birth of the first Zimbabwean to face a ball in a Test. Kevin Arnott's first innings - 40 off 176 balls against India in Harare in 1992-93 - said everything about a technically sound batsman who sold his wicket dearly. In one World Cup match against Pakistan in 1992, he made 7 off 61 balls. He played only four Tests, and in the second, against New Zealand in Bulawayo in 1992-93, became the second Zimbabwean to make a Test hundred. His father, Don, played for Rhodesia in the 1950s.

    1998
    Galle became Test cricket's 79th venue. Sri Lanka hosted New Zealand there on this day, and it quickly became a place where touring sides feared to tread. New Zealand were hammered by an innings - Mahela Jayawardene smacked 167 in a match where nobody else made over 53 - and Sri Lanka won six out of the first eight Tests here: three by an innings, two by 10 wickets, and the other by the small matter of 315 runs. However, the ground was ruined by the tsunami on Boxing Day in 2004 and underwent a large redevelopment before returning as a Test venue in late 2007.

    Other birthdays
    1906 Norman Gallichan (New Zealand)
    1930 Michael Melle (South Africa)
    1940 Richard "Prof" Edwards (West Indies)
    1951 David Ogilvie (Australia)
    1954 Terri Russell (Australia)
    1956 Surinder Khanna (India)
    1965 Helen Plimmer (England)
    1972 Robert Kennedy (New Zealand)
    1976 Cliodhna Sharp (Ireland)
    1977 Hasibul Hossain (Bangladesh)
    1977 Rachel Pullar (New Zealand)
    1979 Neil Ferreira (Zimbabwe)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

  7. #37
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    986
    Rep Power
    0

    Exclamation June 4 : Sunday

    June 4 down the years
    The ball of the century?
    Gatting b Warne
    The ball that made wrist-spin sexy again

    1993
    Shane Warne's Ball of the Century. Mike Gatting usually tucked into bad spin bowlers with the zeal he reserved for lunchtime buffets, and he can't have been too alarmed when a chubby, blond Australian leggie sidled up to bowl his first ball in an Ashes Test. It drifted lazily onto leg stump, then spat back a yard or two and clipped the top of off. The famous picture of Ian Healy aahing and Gatting oohing tells the story perfectly. Wisden noted that "never, perhaps, has one delivery cast so long a shadow over a game, or a series". Australia won the Test by 179 runs, after England's hopes of a draw were dealt a fatal blow when Graham Gooch was out handled the ball on the final afternoon, and they went on to win the series 4-1. It was the ball that made wristspin sexy again, and England never really got over it.

    2013
    Less than a month after three Indian cricketers were arrested for their involvement in spot-fixing, Bangladesh's Mohammad Ashraful confessed to participating in spot-fixing and match-fixing in the Bangladesh Premier League earlier in the year. The Bangladesh board decided not to involve him in any form of cricket till the ICC's Anti-Corruption and Security Unit submitted its report on investigations into the goings-on in the BPL. He was banned for eight years, but it was later reduced to five, with the last two years suspended.

    1957
    A famous duel at Edgbaston, as Peter May and Colin Cowdrey (and their pads) came up against Sonny Ramadhin. Ramadhin had demolished England with 7 for 49 in the first innings, and with West Indies taking a lead of 288, there was much work to do if England were to save the game. May and Cowdrey did that and more with a monumental partnership of 411, then a Test record for the fourth wicket. They denied West Indies for nearly two whole days, their pads thrust forward time and again as a first line of defence. May was still there, unbeaten on 285 at the end, the highest score by an England captain until Graham Gooch's 333 in 1990, and Ramadhin bowled the most balls (588) in any first-class innings. His figures were an eye-watering 98-35-179-2.

    1915
    A New Zealand captain is born. Walter Hadlee is best known as the father of Sir Richard and Dayle, but he played 11 Tests either side of the Second World War, the last eight as captain. The highlight was his sole century, 116 against England in Christchurch in 1946-47. He later became chairman of the New Zealand Board of Control. Hadlee died in Christchurch in 2006, at the age of 91.

    1964
    The Test debut of one Geoff Boycott, and he top-scored with 48 as England struggled to 216 for 8 against Australia in the first Test at Trent Bridge. The first of his 16 opening partners was... Fred Titmus, who was shoved up the order when John Edrich pulled out just before the start. On a tricky pitch in this rain-affected draw, Boycott didn't bat in the second innings because of a fractured finger. As time wore on, he would occasionally come up with less convincing reasons to avoid batting on a sticky wicket. He didn't do too badly, though, as a final haul of 8114 Test runs would suggest.

    1991
    Birth of England allrounder Ben Stokes, who was probably the only bright spot for England during their 5-0 thrashing in Australia in 2013-14, his debut series, in which he scored 279 runs and took 15 wickets in four Tests. An attacking left-hand middle-order batsman and right-arm seamer, his credentials went up a notch when he scored 92 and 101 and picked up three crucial second-innings wickets in England's come-from-behind win at Lord's against New Zealand in 2015. At the Newlands Test in 2016, he blazed 258 off only 198 balls, the second-fastest double-ton in Test history. Few months later, he experienced the heartbreak of conceding four sixes in the final over of the World T20 final, as England conceded the title to West Indies.


    1971
    In only his second Test, Zaheer Abbas laced a glorious 274 against England at Edgbaston, a 544-minute affair that included 38 fours. In 14 Tests against England, Zaheer made two centuries - and both were doubles. Pakistan made 608 for 7, and England were soon 148 for 6. They followed on despite a trademark century from Alan Knott, and were still in big trouble going into the last day. Rain came to the rescue, though - fewer than 15 overs were bowled all day.

    1950
    Birth of Brian Rose, the England left-hander who is best remembered for leading Somerset to their first silverware, the Gillette Cup and the John Player League in 1979, the beginning of a golden age for them. In the same year he courted controversy by declaring Somerset's innings in a Benson & Hedges Cup match after one over, so as to take advantage of a technicality. It didn't do him much good: he was vilified and Somerset were thrown out of the competition. Rose played nine Tests, and stood up well to the West Indies in 1980, when he made 243 runs at 48.60.

    1998
    The Gaffer's first day as England captain. Alec Stewart had been in charge before, but only as a stop gap; when he led England out against South Africa at Edgbaston, it was the real thing. The match ended in a draw after rain washed out the final day, but only after Stewart had inspired some of the most carefree declaration batting seen by an England side in the last 20 years: they slogged their way to 170 for 8 off 45.1 overs, a tentative lead of 289 with a day to play.

    1958
    Birth of the man who postponed his wedding to play for England. Sussex seamer Tony Pigott needn't have bothered - his wedding was scheduled for the fourth day of the Test against New Zealand in Christchurch, and England were stuffed by an innings inside three, bowled out for 82 and 93 in one of their most humiliating defeats. It was Pigott's only Test. He later played for Surrey, and kickstarted the Sussex revolution as chief executive.

    1975
    Dinanath Ramnarine, born today, took 45 wickets with his legbreaks in 12 Tests for West Indies. Some average international performances and brushes with those in a position to influence selection led to him retiring at 28 to pursue his West Indies Players' Association role full-time. He soon found himself in direct conflict with the West Indies board as player disputes became more regular, with both parties tussling for power. In 2007, under the new regime headed by Julian Hunte, he was invited onto the main WICB board. It lasted just two years until he tendered his resignation. He continued to serve as the players' association chief but after ten years of fighting for players' interests, he resigned in 2012.

    1982
    The birth of Thilina Kandamby, a promising young batsman who was in and out of the Sri Lankan side in the mid-2000s. He competed for a spot in the one-day middle order with Thilan Samaraweera and Chamara Kapugedera but lost out to them in the race for a place in the 2011 World Cup squad. He was recalled for the tour of England later that year but was dropped again, recalled after three years for a solitary one-dayer and failed to make the 2015 World Cup squad.

    Other birthdays
    1876 Robert Dower (South Africa)
    1887 Nelson Betancourt (West Indies)
    1910 George Carew (West Indies)
    1959 Russell Tiffin (Zimbabwe)
    1973 Kalpana Liyanarachchi (Sri Lanka)
    1975 Alex Wharf (England)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

  8. #38
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    986
    Rep Power
    0

    Thumbs up june 5th mon.

    June 5 down the years
    What a start
    An extraordinary beginning to an Ashes series
    Nasser Hussain made his career-best 207

    1997
    Fresh from putting the boot into West Indies and dashing South Africa's hopes of world supremacy, Australia came to England as strong favourites. But on the first morning of the series at a delirious Edgbaston, they crumbled to 54 for 8. Only Shane Warne got the Aussies to 118. Then Nasser Hussain and Graham Thorpe added 288 in a thrilling partnership, and Hussain's 207 changed his life. By the same token, Mark Taylor's brave second-innings hundred saved his career (he'd made no fifties in his previous 11 Tests) but not the match: England stormed to a nine-wicket win on the fourth evening, and on the back of a 3-0 one-day whitewash, all was well with the world. For two weeks anyway, until England were bowled out for 77 at Lord's, and reality began to dawn.

    1912
    Birth of a cricket spoilsport. Warwickshire and England legspinner Eric Hollies played only one of his 13 Tests against Australia, but it was enough to give him a place in history. At The Oval in 1948, Don Bradman needed only 4 for a career average of 100... and Hollies bowled him second ball for 0 with a googly. The Observer Sport Monthly deemed it the greatest shock in sporting history.

    1916
    An Invincible is born. Sid Barnes was unlucky only to play 13 Tests (his career sandwiched the Second World War), but he certainly made the most of life at the top - his Test average was 63. He came of age in Sydney in 1946-47, when he made an 11-hour 234 and added 405 for the fifth wicket with Don Bradman - who also made 234. And in the all-conquering 1948 side, he averaged 82, including 141 at Lord's. An often-controversial character whose attempted comeback in the 1950s was blocked by the Australian board, Barnes committed suicide in his native Sydney in 1973.

    2009
    England lost to Netherlands. Off the last ball. In the opening match of the second World T20 in England, Ryan ten Doeschate found himself at the crease in the 14th over with Netherlands needing 47 off the last seven. Top scorer Tom de Grooth (49) had just fallen, and three overs later Peter Borren was dismissed for a 25-ball 30. Ten Doeschate and Edgar Schiferli took it down to seven off the final one. Stuart Broad dropped a catch off ten Doeschate and they needed four off three balls. It only got worse for Broad. Needing two off the final delivery, Schiferli smashed the ball, but Broad collected it in his follow-through and took a shy at the stumps. He missed and Netherlands took the winning run. In the 2014 World T20, Netherlands reprised the performance, beating England by 45 runs.

    1980
    Ian Botham's first day as England captain. It seemed a logical progression when he was given the job for the first Test against West Indies at Trent Bridge. He was the best player in the team by a mile, with averages of 40 with the bat and 18 with the ball from 25 Tests. But he was only 24 years old, and it probably came too early: England won none of Botham's 12 Tests as captain, in which time he averaged 13 with the bat and 33 with the ball. In fairness to Beefy, he presided over 1-0 and 2-0 defeats to West Indies, for which he was slated. England's next three series against the same opposition - 14 defeats, one draw, no wins - put those results into context.

    1974
    Mervyn Dillon might not be fit to lace the boots of Michael Holding and Co, but he was comfortably the pick of their fast bowlers around the turn of the century, till the likes of Fidel Edwards and Jerome Taylor came along. Dillon, who was born on this day, was not genuinely quick, but he jagged the ball both ways off a shortish length. In 38 Tests, he took 131 wickets, with a best match haul of 8 for 123

    1979
    Birth of Scotland batsman Fraser Watts, who played in the 2007 World Cup in West Indies and the World T20 in South Africa, after making his international debut a year before. But while Watts' record against Full Member sides has been modest, he has done reasonably well against other Associates. He got his first one-day hundred in July 2009, against Canada.


    Other birthdays
    1884 Claude Jennings (Australia)
    1906 Jack Robertson (South Africa)
    1921 Lance Pierre (West Indies)
    1936 Kelly Seymour (South Africa)
    1945 Ambar Roy (India)
    1981 Andrew McDonald (Australia)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

  9. #39
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    986
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    June 6 down the years
    501 not out
    A first-class first

    In 1994, Brian Lara surpassed Hanif Mohammad's 499

    1994
    On the 50th anniversary of the D-Day landings, Brian Lara achieved immortality with the highest score in first-class cricket history: 501 not out. As if his Test-record 375 wasn't enough, Lara took the first-class record within two months when he surpassed Hanif Mohammad's 499, while playing for Warwickshire against Durham at Edgbaston. He had a few near-misses - Lara was bowled off a no-ball on 12 and then was dropped by wicketkeeper Chris Scott on 18 (Scott apparently said: "Oh dear, he'll probably go on and get a hundred"). Technically there was only one ball left when he creamed John Morris through the covers for four to bring up the magic 500. In all, Lara faced only 427 deliveries, and hammered 62 fours and ten sixes. On the final day he whacked 174 runs before lunch. For good measure, he also became the first man to make seven hundreds in eight first-class innings, the first of which was the 375. He lost his Test record briefly to Matthew Hayden in 2003, but took it back in April 2004 with 400 against England in Antigua.


    1957
    The career of Mike Gatting, who was born today, was split into three distinct segments. He struggled at first, taking seven years and 54 innings to make his first Test century. But after breaking that duck with 136 in Mumbai in 1984-85, Gatting went on a storming two-year run in which he made nine centuries in 28 Tests and averaged 63. Then came Shakoor Rana, and an alleged liaison with a barmaid that cost him the England captaincy in 1988. Gatting was never the same - he captained the rebel tour to South Africa in 1989, and in 51 Tests either side of his outstanding two-year run of form, he only made one century, a tortuous 117 in Adelaide in 1994-95 as the curtain came gently down on his career.

    1943
    One of Pakistan's finest batsmen is born... in Hyderabad, India. Asif Iqbal came a long way from the 21-year-old who opened the bowling - with his fellow debutant and future batting star Majid Khan - and batted No. 10, against Australia in Karachi in 1964-65. In full flow Asif was a sumptuous sight. He made his first Test century from No. 9, 146 against England at The Oval in 1967, but he eventually graduated into the middle order, where his dashing, fleet-footed strokeplay charmed everyone, not least during a successful stint in county cricket with Kent.

    1988
    Birth of India batsman Ajinkya Rahane. A prolific scorer for Mumbai - he made over 1000 runs in only his second Ranji season - Rahane was on the fringes of the Indian Test team for years before he finally got his chance in the 2013 Delhi Test against Australia. He made up for a forgettable debut by establishing himself as one of India's most valuable overseas batsmen, with centuries in New Zealand, England, Australia and West Indies, and against South Africa at home, in his first 25 Tests, filling the middle-order vacancy left by VVS Laxman's retirement. Rahane has the ability to adapt to different formats, with strong showings in the IPL at the top of the order.

    1991
    After all the fuss, 25-year-old Graeme Hick finally made his England Test debut against West Indies at Headingley. Most pundits had already booked him in for 100 Tests, 8000 runs and an average of 50, but it didn't quite work out like that. In fairness, it was an unforgiving baptism - Curtly Ambrose tortured him all summer, dismissing him six times in a row, but it was Courtney Walsh who ended his first innings when Hick fenced to Jeffrey Dujon, having made just 6.

    1930
    A typhoon is born. In terms of raw, unbridled pace, few bowlers in history can match England's Frank Tyson. Richie Benaud rated him the quickest he ever saw. In 17 Tests, Tyson took 76 wickets at an average of 18. This was no brainless quickie, however - Tyson was a Durham University graduate, and had a penchant for quoting Shakespeare or Wordsworth to batsmen, something you can't quite imagine Glenn McGrath ever doing. Most famously, Tyson blew away Australia as England retained the Ashes in 1954-55. After starting off with 1 for 160 in defeat in Brisbane, he shortened his run and took ten wickets in Sydney and nine more in Melbourne, when he collected 7 for 27 in the second innings and frightened the life out of the Aussies. Injury plagued his career, though, and he emigrated to Australia, where he became a headmaster for a time, before coaching Victoria.

    1982
    Birth of Pakistan left-arm fast bowler Mohammad Irfan, who at 7ft 1in is one of the tallest cricketers to have played the game. When a club cricketer, he was spotted by Aaqib Javed and that chance meeting allowed Irfan to give up his job in a plastic pipe factory and dream of playing for Pakistan. He debuted at 28 on the one-day leg of the 2010 England tour, and while injuries interrupted his career at the start, he went on to make a regular place for himself in the limited-overs sides, troubling batsmen with his bounce and speeds of over 140kph.

    1994
    Brian Lara's 501 overshadowed a routine England victory over New Zealand at Trent Bridge, in a match that ended on the same day. England won by an innings for the first time at home in nine years, thanks mainly to Graham Gooch (210, his last Test hundred), and Phil DeFreitas, who in addition to taking 9 for 165 in the match, made a quick-fire 51 and became the 100th person to take 100 Test wickets.

    1940
    Birth of the South African allrounder Herbert "Tiger" Lance, who played 13 Tests. He was a handy strokeplayer in the lower middle order, and a useful third- or fourth-change seamer. He took 3 for 30 in his first Test innings, against New Zealand in Johannesburg in 1961-62. His finest hour with the bat also came in Johannesburg, when he made 44 and 70 against Australia in 1966-67, a match that South Africa won at a canter despite trailing on first innings.

    1969
    Birth of the Indian left-arm spinner Sunil Joshi, whose Test career had one distinct highlight. In Bangladesh's inaugural Test, in Dhaka, Joshi pooped the party with 92, his only Test fifty, and eight wickets, including his only five-for. It set up India's second overseas victory in 14 years. He had one notable one-day performance as well, grabbing 5 for 6 against South Africa in Nairobi in 1999-2000.

    1959
    Tahir Naqqash, born today, took 34 wickets each in his 15 Tests and 40 ODIs, bowling right-arm fast-medium and offbreaks. But he never bettered his performance in his first Test, in Karachi, where he made his only half-century and took five wickets. Despite a Test career that lasted just three years, Naqqash managed to make tours to Australia, India, England and New Zealand.

    Other birthdays
    1890 Ted Bowley (England)
    1909 Morappakam Gopalan (India)
    1917 Prior Jones (West Indies)
    1956 Andy Pycroft (Zimbabwe)
    1967 Wasim Haider (Pakistan)
    1968 Karen Young (Ireland)
    1972 Dulip Liyanage (Sri Lanka)
    1973 Ashfaq Ahmed (Pakistan)
    1980 Dewald Nel (Scotland)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

  10. #40
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    986
    Rep Power
    0

    Default June 7

    June 7 down the years
    India's nadir
    A row of ducks for India
    Fred Trueman skittled out India's top order
    1952
    The worst start to an innings in Test history. In the first Test at Headingley, India would have fancied their chances when they began their second innings only 41 runs behind England. Fourteen balls later they were 0 for 4, and the game was as good as over. The author of the carnage was England's 21-year-old debutant Fred Trueman. He took three of the wickets, and Alec Bedser the other. Trueman did not look back: he took eight in the second Test, then 8 for 31 in the first innings of the third
    .
    1975
    The beginning of the first World Cup - and an infamous go-slow from Sunil Gavaskar. Having decided that India had no chance of victory after Dennis Amiss smacked England to 334 for 4, Gavaskar booked in for an extended net. In 60 overs he crawled to 36 not out off 174 balls, to the chagrin of his coach, his captain... and one spectator, who was moved to march out and drop his lunch on the pitch. England won by 202 runs after India closed on 132 for 3 - it was the biggest one-day victory until 1984-85.


    1975
    On the same day, Dennis Lillee (5 for 34) bowled Australia to victory over Pakistan with the first one-day five-for, New Zealand thrashed East Africa by 181 runs (171 of them came from Glenn Turner, the first 150 in ODI history), and West Indies stormed to a nine-wicket win over the minnows from Sri Lanka, who were playing their first ODI, still seven years away from Test status.

    1975
    Birth of Shane Bond, the injury-prone New Zealand fast bowler. One of the best of his breed to emerge from his country, Bond injected new life into the New Zealand side on his introduction to Test cricket on the Australia tour of 2001-02, and gave the side a rare fast-bowling option. However, his career was subsequently plagued with injuries, chiefly recurring stress fractures of the back. He had numerous surgeries, which limited him to 18 Tests in all, over eight years. After a stint with the ICL in 2008, which caused NZC to terminate his central contract, he returned to international cricket briefly in 2009. In December that year, he gave up Tests to concentrate on a limited-overs career. But his body couldn't take the strain of that either and he retired from all cricket in May 2010. Bond turned to coaching, and in 2012 was appointed New Zealand's bowling coach, a role he fulfilled till the 2015 World Cup.

    1894
    A Test captain is born. Karl Nunes led West Indies in their inaugural Test match, against England at Lord's in 1928, making 37 and 10 in an innings defeat. His finest hour came two years later, in Jamaica, however, when he and the 20-year-old George Headley added 228 in five and a half hours to secure a famous draw. After retirement, Nunes served as president of the West Indies board from 1945 to 1952.

    1957
    Micky Stewart set a new first-class record by taking seven catches in an innings for Surrey at Northampton, as Jim Laker and Tony Lock wreaked havoc. Six were at backward short-leg and the other in the gully. The Wisden Almanack said that "none was really difficult". No outfielder has taken more than Stewart's seven catches, though Gloucestershire's Tony Brown equalled the record nine years later.

    1964
    Nine Tests for Sri Lankan seamer Graeme Labrooy, who was born today, but the highlight of his career came with the bat. Labrooy had scored more than 11 only once in 12 innings, when he came in at No. 9 against New Zealand in Auckland in 1990-91. He proceeded to smear 70 not out in only 89 minutes, 60 of them in boundaries. He also took seven wickets in the match, but somewhat harshly, he was not picked again.

    1996
    At Edgbaston, a big umpiring error in the burgeoning England career of Nasser Hussain. Playing his first Test for three years, Hussain looked to have gloved one down the leg side off India's Javagal Srinath when he had made 14. But he was let off and went on to make a match-winning 128, his first Test hundred. Between his debut in the West Indies in 1989-90 and this match, Hussain played just seven Tests out of 66.

    1988
    After two successive blackwashes at the hands of West Indies, England warded off the threat of a third at the first time of asking with a draw in the first Test, at Trent Bridge. They had a brilliant 146 not out from Graham Gooch to thank, although it made little difference to the eventual series outcome - West Indies romped home 4-0, and by the end of the summer Gooch, a foot-soldier to Mike Gatting here, was England's fourth captain of the series.

    1993
    Another first Test, and another England rescue act led by a Gooch century - but this one ended in tears when Gooch punched away a delivery from Merv Hughes that was bouncing dangerously over the stumps. Gooch was out handled the ball for 133, the first to go this way for England, and his side's hopes of a draw went with him.

    Other birthdays
    1846 Charlie Absolom (England)
    1875 George Simpson-Hayward (England)
    1907 Alice Wegemund (Australia)
    1921 Myrtle Edwards (Australia)
    1930 Ian Leggat (New Zealand)
    1947 Rudolph Doodnauth (West Indies)
    1957 Neal Radford (England)
    1957 Timur Mohamed (West Indies)
    1975 Marlon Black (West Indies)
    1977 Deep Dasgupta (India)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

  11. #41
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    986
    Rep Power
    0

    Exclamation June 8

    June 8 down the years
    Deadly on his day
    A spinner in name if not nature
    Derek Underwood: left-arm spin or left-arm medium?

    1945
    A deadly left-arm spinner is born. No modern bowler has been quite as lethal on a sticky wicket as Derek Underwood, making his nickname utterly apposite. He was a spinner in name if not in nature - he was close to medium pace, and a few books still classify him as "LM". No England spinner can match his 123 wickets in victories. In those games, he averaged 15, with ten five-fors in 27 matches. His finest hour was against Australia at a soggy Oval in 1968, when he took 7 for 50 in the second innings and sealed a glorious victory when John Inverarity padded up to an arm ball with only five minutes of the match left. He was also a legend at Kent, where he formed a spinner-keeper partnership with Alan Knott that served England well, and that perhaps only Ian Healy and Shane Warne can match for sustained excellence and devastation. Underwood managed a couple of big milestones for his county too: in 1963, aged 18, he became the youngest person to take 100 wickets in a season. And in 1984, aged 39, he finally made his only first-class hundred, against Sussex in Hastings.

    1932
    The birth of the first English captain to regain the Ashes in Australia since Douglas Jardine. Ray Illingworth's Test career was a modest one until he took charge for the first time at the age of 37, against West Indies in 1969. Within 18 months he had led England to a famous 2-0 victory in Australia. He overcame all sorts of obstacles, not least a public who wanted Colin Cowdrey as captain. (Also, in the Wisden Almanack, EM Wellings wrote that "the attitude of numerous Australians has never in my experience been so hostile to an English captain".) A quintessential Yorkshireman, Illingworth didn't exactly endear himself when he led his team off the field in the decider in Sydney after John Snow was attacked on the boundary. As an offspinning allrounder, Illy was cussed and miserly. Throughout his career he went for less than two runs per over, and his batting benefited from his over-my-dead-body mentality more than any technical brilliance. Despite being recognised by many as having a peerless cricket brain, Illingworth went down in many people's estimation after an ill-fated reign as England coach. He took the reins in 1994 but never saw eye to eye with his captain, Mike Atherton, and had an unedifying public falling out with Devon Malcolm in South Africa in 1995-96.

    1950
    The Test debut of West Indies' spin twins, Sonny Ramadhin and Alf Valentine. They had only played two first-class matches each before this tour, but were pitched in for the first Test on an Old Trafford turner. Valentine had a sensational start, with 8 for 104 in the first innings, and 11 wickets in the match. But it was another debutant left-armer, England's Bob Berry, who won the match with 9 for 116. Despite that, Berry only played one more Test - he went wicketless at Lord's, while Ramadhin and Valentine shared 18 wickets to inspire a famous victory.

    1857
    James Grundy, playing for MCC v Kent at Lord's, became the first man to be given out handled the ball.

    1906
    Birth of Syed Nazir Ali, who played alongside his brother Wazir in India's inaugural Test, at Lord's in 1932. Nazir was a fine allrounder who also played for Sussex, and made two Test appearances. He died in Lahore in 1975.

    Other birthdays
    1866 Punch Philipson (England)
    1891 Fred Susskind (South Africa)
    1901 Archibald Palm (South Africa)
    1903 Leslie Townsend (England)
    1919 Guy Overton (New Zealand)
    1924 Ian Colquhoun (New Zealand)
    1929 Venatappa Muddiah (India)
    1946 Richie Robinson (Australia)
    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

  12. #42
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    986
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    June 9 down the years
    Gooch sets up history
    England's first home victory over West Indies in two decades
    Graham Gooch made 61.11% of his team's runs at Headingley in 1991


    1991
    Graham Gooch's unforgettable 154 not out set England up for their first home victory over West Indies for 22 years. In horrible conditions for batting at Headingley, Gooch made 61.11% of his team's second-innings 252, an England record. Only Mark Ramprakash and Derek Pringle, who both made 27, managed more than 6. Pringle's contribution was crucial. He hung around in a partnership of 98 for the seventh wicket, and was there when Gooch symbolically refused the offer of light on the third evening. Psychologically that was the clincher. Gooch was at his hard-nosed, uncomplicated best, and hardly ever looked like getting out. The Wisden Almanack said that "no praise could be too lavish". Phil DeFreitas took 8 for 93, and Ramprakash, a debutant along with Graeme Hick and Steve Watkins, took a blinding catch to get rid of Phil Simmons, and a direct hit to see off Carl Hooper.

    1983
    The beginning of the third World Cup - and one of the biggest shocks in cricket history. Nine years before they were granted Test status, Zimbabwe, inspired by their 34-year-old captain Duncan Fletcher, stunned Australia with a 13-run victory in their first-ever one-day international, at Trent Bridge. Fletcher cracked 69 not out in Zimbabwe's victory, then took 4 for 42 as Australia spluttered to 226 for 7. Another old stager, John Traicos, with an impeccable spell of 12-2-27-0, was also central to the victory. On the same day, England got their campaign underway by thumping New Zealand at The Oval. Allan Lamb hammered 102 and Martin Snedden (12-1-105-2) became the first bowler to notch a century in an ODI.

    1975
    In Birmingham, England, a big-hitting but controversial Australian is born. Andrew Symonds was included in the England A squad to tour Pakistan in 1995, but decided he was a fair-dinkum Aussie after all. He was one of the stars of Australia's World Cup campaign in 2003. He made his Test debut in 2004 and got his maiden hundred in the Ashes two years later. The 2007-08 season was his best, with 777 runs in nine Tests against Sri Lanka, India and West Indies. The high was an unbeaten 162 in the first innings at the SCG, which was quickly followed by the low of a lengthy race row involving Harbhajan Singh. Things got worse for Symonds, who had earlier struggled with alcohol and disciplinary problems. He was dropped from the side for going fishing instead of attending a team meeting, then got into a pub brawl, and in 2009 was sent back from the World T20 for an alcohol-related incident. He played T20s in England, India and Australia till 2012, when he announced his retirement from all forms of cricket.

    1967
    Geoff Boycott's highest Test score - and the innings that got him dropped. Boycott crawled to 246 not out against India at Headingley in just short of ten hours, and though England went on to win the game by six wickets, the chairman of selectors, Doug Insole, dropped him for the next Test because of selfish (as opposed to slow) batting.

    1955
    On the same day 12 years earlier, another Englishman who was later dropped for selfish batting made his Test debut. Ken Barrington failed to score against South Africa at Trent Bridge - he made a duck in the first innings of a match that England won by an innings. He was dropped after making 34 and 18 in the next Test but returned four years later and was in the runs straight away, with three consecutive 80s against India.

    1972
    Birth of one of a unique cricket sextet. When Zimbabwe played New Zealand in the first Test in Harare in 1997-98, Bryan and Paul Strang were one of three sets of brothers in the side, along with the Rennies (Gavin and John) and the Flowers (Andy and Grant). Bryan was a diligent if low-slung left-arm seamer who faded after a promising start to his Test career. In his first 11 Tests he took 29 wickets at 27. In 15 subsequent Tests he took 27 wickets at 51. Zimbabwe didn't win any of his 26 Tests.

    1987
    Birth of diminutive Bangladesh wicketkeeper Mushfiqur Rahim. Having broken into the national team as a teenager, he made his maiden Test century - off just 112 balls - against a strong Indian attack, in Chittagong in 2010. A year later, he replaced Shakib Al Hasan as captain, and found early success when Bangladesh beat India and Sri Lanka to make it to the Asia Cup final. In 2013, he led Bangladesh to a 3-0 ODI whitewash of New Zealand at home. He produced Bangladesh's first Test double-century, in 2013, but was stripped of the ODI captaincy the following year after Bangladesh's form fell away. He continued to lead in Test cricket, though, and made centuries in consecutive Tests - in Wellington and in Hyderabad - in early 2017.

    1919
    Odd goings on in Taunton, where Somerset fielded one S Trimnell against Gloucestershire. He made 92 and 58 not out. Nothing odd there, except that Trimnell was actually Sidney Rippon, an established Somerset player. No reason was ever given for the change of name.


    Other birthdays
    1890 Doug Meintjes (South Africa)
    1905 Harry Alexander (Australia)
    1937 Charlie Stayers (West Indies)
    1937 Lesley Johnston (Australia)
    1955 Michael Taylor (Australia)
    1960 Grant Paterson (Zimbabwe)
    1974 Dale Benkenstein (South Africa)
    1977 Usman Afzaal (England)
    1977 Brighton Watambwa (Zimbabwe)
    1984 Michael Beer (Australia)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

  13. #43
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    986
    Rep Power
    0

    Exclamation June 10

    June 10 down the years

    India conquer HQ
    Kapil and Co pull it off at Lord's

    Dilip Vengsarkar: the first to score hundreds in three successive Lord's Tests

    1986
    India put the seal on their first Test win in 11 attempts at Lord's, after a nervous chase on the final day. They needed 134 to win but were stuttering at 78 for 4 and then 110 for 5. Enter their captain, Kapil Dev, who left nobody in any doubt as he smacked 23 off only ten balls, finishing things off in a grand manner with a six off Phil Edmonds. Kapil took the match award, but the real architect was Dilip Vengsarkar, whose unbeaten 126 in the first innings made him the first person to score hundreds in three successive Lord's Tests. For England's own middle-order charmer, David Gower, it was the end of the line as captain. Less than a year after he had been the darling of the nation when England regained the Ashes, he was replaced by Mike Gatting. Gower was restored as captain in 1989, but that lasted only one series, when Australia toured.

    2012
    Tino Best made what was at that point the highest score by a No. 11 in Tests - an entertaining 95 at Edgbaston, full of drives and edges, that helped West Indies to their first 400-plus total of the tour. While Best missed a well-deserved hundred, his partner Denesh Ramdin got one - his first in three years - and celebrated it by taking out a note from his pocket that read, "Yeah Viv talk nah" - a response to Viv Richards' criticism of his batting. That was all by way of entertainment in the match, where three days of play were washed out. England won the series 2-0, and Ramdin, who later apologised for his gesture, was fined

    1968
    It's common knowledge that Doug Walters struggled badly in Tests in England, where he averaged 25 - just over half his career average. But on this day he continued a superb display in his first overseas Ashes Test, with 86 in the second innings at Old Trafford. Walters had made 81 in the first innings, and his performance was central to Australia's 159-run victory in a low-scoring match.

    1981
    When Albie Morkel, born today, first emerged on the scene as a right-arm fast-medium bowler and left-hand batsman, he was talked up as the next Lance Klusener. However, his early career suggested he was best suited to T20. In his first 51 one-dayers, he made only two half-centuries, both against Zimbabwe. He played the World T20s in 2009 and 2010, without spectacular results, but his IPL form was better - in 54 games in the first four seasons, he scored 674 runs (at a strike rate of 144) and took 56 wickets for Chennai Super Kings. Morkel got his first Test when he replaced his brother Morne against Australia in 2009, but he could never really break through in the longer formats, and has been a regular for South Africa only in T20 cricket.

    1986
    A precocious talent who scored 73 on first-class debut at the age of 16, Khurram Manzoor was one of many Test openers tried, dropped and called up again by Pakistan's selectors. In 2009, Manzoor had been not out on 59 overnight in his second Test when it had to be scrapped after the Sri Lankan team bus was attacked by terrorists in Lahore. On Pakistan's disastrous 2009-10 tour of Australia, Manzoor batted for six hours, trying unsuccessfully to save the Hobart Test. But his best innings came against South Africa in October 2013, when he scored 146 and shared an opening century stand with Shan Masood in Abu Dhabi. Pakistan won the Test by seven wickets.

    1989
    Birth of David Miller, who was picked in the South African limited-overs side in 2010 for his power-hitting. Batting in the middle order, with the view of fulfilling the role of a finisher, Miller scored six half-centuries in his first 40 ODIs - over three and a half years. But it was in the 2014 IPL that he flourished, playing blazing knocks in early and late stages of the Kings XI Punjab innings, scoring 446 at a strike of 150. Having entrenched himself in the South Africa limited-overs middle order, he began the 2015 World Cup with an unbeaten 138 off 92 as South Africa saw off Zimbabwe, but his most vital contribution of the tournament came in the semi-final (which ultimately ended in more heartbreak for his team) when he blitzed 49 off 18 to help lift South Africa to 281 after rain interrupted at 38 overs and shortened the innings to 43.

    Other birthdays
    1911 Chilla Christ (Australia)
    1939 Rudi Webster (Scotland)
    1962 Floris Jansen (Netherlands)
    1969 Pieter Strydom (South Africa)
    1969 Nick Dyer (Scotland)
    1972 Eric Upashantha (Sri Lanka)
    1978 Ian Blackwell (England)
    1983 Sunnette Viljoen (South Africa)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

  14. #44
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    986
    Rep Power
    0

    Exclamation June 11

    June 11 down the years
    Saqlain's hat-trick

    Only the second man to get three in three balls twice

    Saqlain Mushtaq's was the second hat-trick in World Cups

    1999
    A World Cup hat-trick for Saqlain Mushtaq, as Pakistan thrashed Zimbabwe by 148 runs in the Super Six match at The Oval. Given the men he dismissed, it's one he might remember quite sheepishly: Henry Olonga (one-day international average: 4.36), Adam Huckle (2.25), and Pommie Mbangwa (4.71) were never in danger of doing much tail-wagging. But a World Cup hat-trick is a World Cup hat-trick: this was only the second, and Saqqy also became the second man (Wasim Akram was the first) to take two hat-tricks in ODIs.

    1907
    It might have been one of the wettest summers on record, but what was clear was that Northamptonshire's batsmen were all at sea. Three weeks after being bowled out for 60 and 39 by Kent, they were skittled for 12 in 40 minutes by Gloucestershire at Gloucester. It remains the lowest score in county cricket and the third lowest of all time. George Dennett was the destroyer, with 8 for 9 (all eight wickets came for three runs), and he took 7 for 12 in Northants' second innings. They held on for a draw, however.

    2008
    The arrival of English cricket's sugar daddy. When Allen Stanford landed his sleek black helicopter on the hallowed turf of Lord's, flanked by a cortege of West Indian legends and greeted with presidential pomp and ceremony by the ECB, the intended message was that nothing in the game would ever be the same again. Minutes later Stanford unveiled a Perspex box containing US$20 million, the sum of money that would be up for grabs in the first of five winner-takes-all "20/20 for 20s" in Antigua in November that year. It all seemed a bit unreal, and sure enough, it was: Stanford was arrested for fraud to the tune of millions of dollars early in 2009.

    1951
    A Calypso allrounder is born. Collis King could be an absolutely devastating hitter on his day. His coronation came in the World Cup final of 1979, when he flayed England all round Lord's in a breathtaking 66-ball 86, having come to the crease with West Indies in trouble. His career was effectively finished after he was banned for going on a rebel tour to South Africa in 1983-84. He also played for Glamorgan and Worcestershire.

    1971
    Many cricketers have a mid-life crisis, in the course of which they reinvent themselves, but nobody can match New Zealand's efficient, un-fussy opener Mark Richardson, who was born today. When Richardson began his first-class career with Auckland, he was a left-arm spinner who batted No. 10. But after suffering an attack of the yips, he concentrated on his batting to increasingly good effect. He was 30 when he made his Test debut, scored 99 in his second Test, and his first of four hundreds against Pakistan in Hamilton in 2001. Richardson retired in 2004, having played 38 Tests and scored at an average of 44.7. His after-match challenges to the opposition's slowest runner were popular, and he often contested them in a beige lycra jumpsuit.

    1927
    Pelham Warner made the first ball-by-ball radio broadcast from Lord's on the first day of the match between Middlesex and Nottinghamshire. The BBC had asked for a perch in the pavilion, but instead were stuck next to the clock at the Nursery End. The experiment was deemed a success and was repeated for Eton v Harrow and Oxford v Cambridge, two games of social, if not general, importance.

    1983
    More World Cup offspinning derring-do. It's a slightly odd stat that Vic Marks is the only English spinner to take two ODI five-fors, as he only ever took one for Somerset. The first came on this day against Sri Lanka on his home ground, in Taunton. After David Gower smacked five sixes in a brilliant 130, Marks flighted his way to 5 for 39 as England won comfortably
    .
    1939
    Birth of England's most famous female cricketer. Rachael Heyhoe-Flint hit the first six in women's Test history - against Australia at The Oval in 1963 - and was a fine batsman and captain of her country. But her real contribution came in bringing women's cricket into the public eye. She helped organise the inaugural World Cup in 1973 - and then lifted the trophy when England won it. A year earlier she had been awarded the MBE. Heyhoe-Flint, who also played hockey for England, was a key campaigner in women being allowed membership of MCC.

    1954
    Birth of the dogged Australian opener John Dyson, who had the misfortune to make his maiden Test century in one of his country's most spectacular defeats - at Headingley in 1981. In all, Dyson played 30 Tests, but an average of 26 did him a Ramprakashian injustice. He was also famous for a succession of breathtaking outfield catches for New South Wales. He later took to coaching, working with Sri Lanka and then with West Indies.

    1995
    England's hopes of feeding on the carcass of West Indies cricket after they had been dethroned by Australia took a blow when they were smashed by nine wickets inside four days in the first Test, at Headingley. This was a mixed day for English sport: the football team were thumped 3-1 by Brazil in the Umbro Cup, but Rob Andrew's last-minute drop-goal gave the rugby side a famous World Cup win over Australia.

    1978
    A first-over specialist is born. Daryl Tuffey, a strapping fast-medium bowler from New Zealand, had an amazing penchant for picking up wickets in the first over of games, both Tests and one-dayers. After a quiet start he settled into a quality groove as the sort of player capable of performing well on most surfaces, and his finest hour was 6 for 54 to help New Zealand tie the three-Test series with England in Auckland in 2001-02.

    1942
    In the age Before Murali, Somachandra de Silva, who was born today, was probably Sri Lanka's best spin bowler. He was 39 when Sri Lanka played their inaugural Test, and was the first to take a five-for - 5 for 59 against Pakistan in Faisalabad later that winter. He bowed out after their famous draw at Lord's in 1984, when he bowled impressively for figures of 45-16-85-2.

    1967
    Birth of one of the first men to be punished for match-fixing. The international career of South African seamer Henry Williams - seven one-day internationals and an average of 25 - would have been largely forgettable had he not become embroiled in the scandal. Williams and Herschelle Gibbs were banned from international cricket for six months in 2000, when they admitted to accepting money from Hansie Cronje to underperform in a one-day international. Williams agreed to concede more than 50 runs off his ten overs. As it transpired, he was injured and bowled only 11 balls.

    1987
    After captaining South Africa Under-19s at the 2006 World Cup and showing much promise in his formative years, Dean Elgar, born today, had to wait his turn at the senior level. He was given a maiden ODI call-up in 2011, following a solid first-class season for Knights. His style of play seemed more fitted to the longer format, though, and he debuted in Tests in November 2012, against Australia in Perth, and registered a pair. By 2014, though, he had become a regular in the line-up. During his 118 against England at Kingsmead in 2015 he became the sixth South African to carry his bat in a Test innings. Elgar hit a bit of a purple patch in Tests in 2016-17, when he made three fifties and two hundreds in six innings.

    Other birthdays
    1935 Fazal-ur-Rehman (Pakistan)
    1975 Mithra Wettimuny (Sri Lanka)

    ? ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

  15. #45
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    986
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    June 12 down the years
    The Karachi streetfighter
    Birth of only the second man whose Test average never fell below 50

    Javed Miandad played in a record six World Cups

    1957
    Pakistan's greatest batsman is born. From the moment Javed Miandad caressed 163 in his first Test innings, against New Zealand in Lahore in 1976-77, his career was touched by genius. He is one of only two men (England's Herbert Sutcliffe is the other) to have a Test average that never dropped below 50. Miandad made 206 in his fourth Test innings, and six double-hundreds in all. The only blot on his copybook is a modest record against West Indies - an average of 29 from 16 Tests - but it was against them that he played perhaps his greatest innings, a match-winning 114 in Guyana in 1987-88. There was always the suggestion that you had to knock over all three stumps to get Miandad out at home: he was lbw 15 times in overseas Tests before it happened even once in Pakistan, but he was comfortably one of the finest batsmen of his generation. Miandad, who also played in a record six World Cups, loved a scrap: most famously, he waved his bat threateningly at Dennis Lillee in Perth in 1983-84, and mimicked Indian wicketkeeper Kiran More's noisy appealing by jumping and shrieking during the World Cup match in Sydney in 1991-92.

    1956
    Terry Alderman, born today, will always be remembered as the man who reduced Graham Gooch's technique to rubble, particularly in 1989, when Gooch's form was so poor that he asked to be left out. In all, he nailed Gooch seven times. Alderman, the definitive wicket-to-wicket bowler, was devastating In two series in England, in 1981 and 1989 (he missed 1985 because of a rebel tour), though he never had it quite so good anywhere else. He took almost as many wickets in 12 Tests in England (83) as he did in 29 Tests elsewhere (87). Not surprisingly, therefore, Alderman was a success for Kent and Gloucestershire. His sister Denise also played cricket for Australia.

    1939
    Birth of the only man to be no-balled for throwing in a Lord's Test. South African paceman Geoff Griffin never recovered from being called no fewer than 11 times in the 1960 Test - he did not bowl again on the tour, and never played another Test. It was a real rollercoaster ride: earlier in the match, only his second Test, he'd taken a hat-trick.

    1983
    A day Winston Davis of West Indies is unlikely to forget - he hurried Australia to defeat with 7 for 51 in a World Cup match in Headingley. They were, at the time, the best figures in one-day internationals. Better still, this was only his second ODI. It was a bit of a false dawn, though: it took Davis another 12 matches to take his next seven wickets.

    1973
    A tense win for England in an extraordinary Test at Trent Bridge. Having been skittled for 97 in their first innings, New Zealand looked to have absolutely no chance of chasing 479 to win. But Bev Congdon (176) and Vic Pollard (116) made a great fist of things, and at 402 for 5 a sensational result looked on. In the end England triumphed by just 38 runs.

    1930
    Birth of Jim Burke, the stalwart Australian opener of the 1950s. He played 24 Tests, but never really hit the heights of his debut, when he made 101 not out against England in Adelaide in 1950-51. Burke was a dashing No. 6 then, but was dropped and went down the Ravi Shastri route, returning as a scrapper of an opener. He was ensconced at No. 2 when he made a Test-best 189 against South Africa in Cape Town in 1957-58. Burke didn't bowl his offspinners often, which was probably a good thing - his action, described by Ian Peebles as "like a policeman applying his truncheon to a particularly short offender's head" - was extremely suspect. He was also the only man to escape the clutches of Jim Laker when Laker took 19 wickets in the Old Trafford Test of 1956. Burke committed suicide in his native Sydney in 1979.

    1935
    Australia's youngest male cricketer is born. Ian Craig made his first-class debut for New South Wales aged only 16 - and within a year he was fast-tracked into the Test side. He looked the part, making 53 and 47 on debut against South Africa in Melbourne in 1952-53. Five years later he was Australia's youngest captain too, but the Bradman comparisons wore him down. He played his last Test at 22, and his last first-class match at 26.

    1947
    Tom Brierley made 116 not out for Lancashire against Glamorgan at Liverpool, equalling his career best... which had come in 1938 for Glamorgan against Lancashire at Old Trafford.

    1964
    Birth of the Essex offspinner Peter Such, who had a storming Test debut but was soon rendered impotent like many other modern-day English fingerspinners. Such took 6 for 67 in his first Test innings, against Australia at Old Trafford in 1993, and added another five-for against them in Sydney almost six years later. He only made 11 Test appearances in total, all against Australia and New Zealand. Such was also a magnificently inept batsman, who on his Test debut played Merv Hughes from close to square leg. His last Test innings, against New Zealand at Old Trafford in 1999, was a 72-minute duck. It brought him a standing ovation.

    1959
    Birth of the man who took the first one-day international hat-trick. Pakistani seamer Jalal-ud-Din only played eight one-dayers (despite a record of 14 wickets at an average of 15) and six Tests. He was playing just his second ODI when he wrote his name in the record books, getting rid of Rod Marsh, Bruce Yardley and Geoff Lawson with successive deliveries in Hyderabad in 1982-83.

    1976
    Birth of Zimbabwe left-arm spinner Ray Price, who nearly bowled his side to victory with a ten-wicket haul against West Indies in a Test in Harare in 2003, only to be thwarted by a last-wicket stand by Ridley Jacobs and Fidel Edwards. He took nine more in the next Test but soon after, threw in his lot with Heath Streak and the rebel cricketers, and went to England to play county cricket. He returned from national exile in 2008, when the board offered him a central contract, and went on to become a very useful one-day bowler, ranked No. 2 in the world in the format in 2009.

    1990
    Mike Atherton announced himself on the world stage with a maiden century in his third Test - a classical 151 against New Zealand in a rain-affected draw at Trent Bridge. At the age of 22, he was at the time England's youngest century-maker since David Gower 12 years earlier - a record broken by Alastair Cook, who scored his maiden hundred at 21 years and 69 days in 2006.

    1961
    Birth of New Zealand allrounder Rod Latham. He scored his maiden Test hundred in only his second Test, against Zimbabwe in Bulawayo in 1992, but he played only two more Tests after that. Latham was sent in as an opener during the World Cup earlier that year, partnering Mark Greatbatch as New Zealand set a trend with their explosive starts. However, Latham's ODI career was restricted to only 33 games. His son Tom, a Test opener, currently plays for New Zealand.

    Other birthdays
    1860 Jack Edwards (Australia)
    1861 William Attewell (England)
    1948 Norbert Phillip (West Indies)
    1960 Rajinder Singh Ghai (India)
    1967 Neil Maxwell (Fiji)
    1968 Trevor Penney (Zimbabwe)

    ESPN cricinfo
    Resources.

Similar Threads

  1. Down to memory lane hot zeenat aman
    By javsayy in forum Bollywood Celebrities
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 11-07-2017, 05:44 PM
  2. Rare duets of down memory lane #111
    By UpdateA1 in forum Music
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 27-04-2017, 02:17 PM
  3. Trip Down the Memory Lane
    By ! K ! in forum Chit Chat Corner
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 24-10-2011, 07:21 PM
  4. kya din the woh......down memory lane
    By NERORULZ in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-12-2008, 04:15 PM
  5. Taj Hotel: Down Memory Lane !
    By gors1 in forum Bollywood Celebrities
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 03-12-2008, 02:02 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •