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Thread: Ball tampering: The most infamous incidents in cricket

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    Default Ball tampering: The most infamous incidents in cricket



    An already emotionally charged Test series between South Africa and Australia turned several shades darker on Saturday after Australian opener Cameron Bancroft was charged with altering the condition of the ball.

    • Ball tampering is an ICC Level 2 offence, which carries a maximum 100 per cent fine and up to four demerit points
    • In 2002, Waqar Younis became the first bowler to cop a ban for ball tampering
    • In 2016, Faf du Plessis was found guilty of ball tampering for using mints to alter the condition of the ball


    NEW DELHI: An already emotionally charged Test series between South Africa and Australia turned several shades darker on Saturday after Australian opener Cameron Bancroft was charged with altering the condition of the ball and skipper Steve Smith admitted that seniors within the team had hatched the plan to gain advantage of a Test match that was slipping away.

    Bancroft was picked up by TV camera putting a yellow object down the front of his pants before the two on-field umpires went to him and asked what was in his pockets. Not long after footage was shown in which Bancroft was seen rubbing the ball and then seemingly putting an object back in his right pocket.

    Addressing the media at the end of the third day's play, Bancroft admitted that he had tried to change the condition of the ball using a foreign object while his "embarrassed "captain Smith, seated next to him, took responsibility.
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    Ball tampering is a Level 2 offence in the ICC Code of Conduct, which carries a maximum 100 per cent fine and up to four demerit points, which equates to a one-Test suspension.



    • In 2016, during a Test match in Hobart, South Africa captain Faf du Plessis was found guilty of ball tampering by the ICC for using mints to alter the condition of the ball, but was cleared to play the next match. On that occasion, television footage had showed him shining the ball with a mint in his mouth. He pleaded not guilty to the charge but was fined his entire match fee for 'changing the condition of the ball in breach of Law 42.3'.

    •In 2001, during India's acrimonious tour of South Africa, Sachin Tendulkar was fined 75 per cent of his match fee and suspended for one Test after the match referee Mike Denness alleged that he had tampered the ball. While TV cameras showed Tendulkar working on the seam of the ball during a Test match it was suggested that he had been merely cleaning some mud off the seam. However, Denness did not buy that logic and suspended Tendulkar. A storm ensured, with the Indian team threatening to quit the tour if the decision was not reversed. The BCCI boycotted the final match which was played and deemed an 'unofficial Test'.

    • In 2002, Waqar Younis became the first bowler to cop a ban for ball tampering after footage showed him lifting the seam of the ball during an ODI in Sri Lanka. Waqar was handed a one-match ban while Azhar Mahmood, who was also seen gouging the side of the ball with thumbnails, was charged 30% of his match fee. Waqar was banned because of an earlier incident during a Test match on the same tour.
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    • In 1994, then England captain Michael Atherton was fined 2,000 pounds after TV pictures appeared to show him putting his hand into his pocket and then applying an illegal substance to the ball. Atherton denied doing so while saying that he was drying his hands on a hot and humid day, and was subsequently cleared from the charges. However, he later admitted that he had failed to inform the match referee that he had dried his hands on dirt which he was carrying in his pocket. Atherton was fined 1,000 pounds for 'using dirt' and other 1,000 pounds for 'giving incomplete information to the match referee'.

    • In 2010, Shahid Afridi was handed a two-match ban after he was seen on TV chewing on one side of the cricket ball during an ODI in Perth. Afridi, leading Pakistan in that match, apologised after being caught biting the ball.

    • Rahul Dravid was the other iconic Indian cricketer to be embroiled in tampering claims. In 2004, during an ODI in Australia, the then Indian vice-captain was charged for ball tampering and fined for rubbing a lozenge on one side of the ball. Footage showed Dravid running one side of the ball with his saliva and then peeling off a jelly like substance. While Dravid denied the allegations, he was fined half of his match fees with the match referee Clive Lloyd saying that the ploy from Dravid had been deliberate.
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    Ball-tampering fall-out: Cricket Australia loses major sponsor



    IMAGE: Axed Australian cricket captain Steve Smith is escorted by Police officers as he leaves the O.R. Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg on Wednesday.
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    Cameron Bancroft, who was caught on camera attempting to scuff up the ball with improvised sandpaper during a test against South Africa in Cape Town, was banned for nine months. All three were sent home from South Africa.

    Magellan said it was ending its contract with Cricket Australia seven months into a three-year deal which was based on shared values of "integrity, leadership, dedication and an unwavering customer-first culture".

    "A conspiracy by the leadership of the Australian Men's Test Cricket Team which broke the rules with a clear intention to gain an unfair advantage during the third test in South Africa goes to the heart of integrity," Magellan CEO Hamish Douglass said in the statement.

    "These recent events are so inconsistent with our values that we are left with no option but to terminate our ongoing partnership with Cricket Australia."

    Magellan has not put a price on the sponsorship deal and did not immediately return calls seeking more details, but Australian media reported it was worth about A$20 million ($15.30 million). The company's 2017 annual report forecast a "material increase in its currently modest marketing expenditure" in part because of cricket sponsorship.

    Morals clauses are commonplace in sports sponsorship deals, allowing both parties to exit if the other engages in conduct that might negatively impact on the image, goodwill and reputation of their partner.

    More than 52 percent of Australians thought suspending players for a season was the most appropriate punishment for ball tampering, a poll by Australian cable television network Sky News found. Nearly a third supported a lifetime ban.

    Breakfast cereal maker Sanitarium Australia, which is owned by the Seventh-dayAdventistChurch, said it ended its relationship with team captain Smith as a breakfast cereal "Weet-Bix brand ambassador", effective immediately.

    "Weet-Bix ambassadors represent our brand values of trust and integrity, and they speak to everything that is good about being Australian," said Sanitarium executive general manager Todd Saunders.

    "Based on the ball tampering incident and the findings of Cricket Australia's investigation, we are unable to continue our relationship with Steve Smith," Saunders added.

    Sports apparel maker ASICS Corp cancelled sponsorship deals with both vice-captain Warner and Bancroft, describing their actions as "not something that ASICS tolerates and are contrary to the values the company stands for".
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