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Thread: My Weekly Tech Journal

  1. #91
    SB Legend Major General hotspicyhot's Avatar
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    Question 'My Net's slow, do I dump my ISP?'

    Short answer: NO . Read on first.

    You know by now that your speed seems to differ by the hour, and even
    across speed calculators. Why does that happen?

    The primary reason is, your internet speed isn't fixed, and does differ by the hour. You might feel like your ISP is pulling your leg at certain hours when lots of people are logged on to the internet at the same time (this article claims the dreaded hours are 10 am - 6 pm in the India; by rule of thumb it's the peak office hours, as well as after hours when all the Net freak in the world are busy socializing.


    Secondly,
    Different speed tests have different parameters. In case you're aiming to track your internet speed, it's advisable that you stick to any one method. Remember that upload speeds are generally waaaaay slower than download speeds (that's because people upload files much less frequently than they download 'em).


    Thirdly,
    If your PC is attached to a network and someone else is working online, your bandwidth is shared among users. You might be in for some seriously sluggish online moments if the other user(s) are doing download-intensive stuff, such as downloading MP3s or video files.


    Hence
    In case you're up to suing your ISP for not delivering (or deciding to opt for a different ISP, to be more realistic), you should measure your internet speed across different times of the day, and on different days. Compare your average findings to the speed your ISP is advertising. If they're close, be happy and bury the hatchet. Switch to another ISP only if the disparity is alarming. My experience: Major ISPs from the same city, despite their claims to offering the best packages, don't really differ in terms of service quality. And, in case you've been using your email accounts provided by your ISP, switching would mean you have to go through the hassle of moving all your data to your new account, which, more often than not, isn't easy.

    Advice:
    Ask people around when you're in an internet speed dilemma. Ask a friend who's using a different connection to measure his/her internet speed (or better, check it out yourself when you're visiting, since friends are by default as lazy as ourselves ); compare the results to your own findings and ponder.

    If you're using a good dial-up connection, there's a chance it might still best the newbie broadband in your locale, so you should always check; but if you have a T-1 or better option available in your area and you're willing to dish out the bill each month, hesitate no further. An average ADSL will always be better than a dial-up, and a T-1 will almost certainly beat an ADSL.
    If you make yourself more than just a man, if you devote yourself to an ideal, then, you become something else entirely.
    Are you ready to begin?

  2. #92
    SB Legend Brigadier General VrOoM's Avatar
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    hmm great one...tfs...repped

  3. #93
    SB Legend Major General hotspicyhot's Avatar
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    Arrow Why a 56K dial-up will never be even close to 56K

    Why a 56K dial-up will never be even close to 56K

    And it never will be (sorry if this broke your heart). Yes, your dial-up might not be as fast as your ISP is advertising it to be, but make no mistake that you'll never reach your modem-capacity mileage. Reasons :

    1. Static electricity caused by radio signals, power lines and other sources interfere with your modems signals. This results in the 56K to fall back to 42-50Kbps.
    2. 56K modems also require a clean, straight through telephone connection to the telephone company's central office switching center. Phone company line amplifiers that boost a telephone signal over a long distance, PBX switchboard systems, and other phone equipment alter the phone signal and force 56K modems to fall back to speeds of 33.6Kbps and lower.
    3. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and such don't allow 56K modems to use the full range of signals that phone company equipment can generate, fearing it'll cause static interference to other phone lines.


    Therefore, no modem ever connects at 56K. Most 56K modem users seem to connect at speeds of 44-48Kbps, at most. In general it's around 33 Kbps. If you're connecting at very low speeds, you ought to:

    • Check whether you're dialing the right number
    • Make sure you've got the basics right
    • Check whether your PC is infected with viruses or anything that's eating up your bandwidth
    • Update your modem driver (your modem should come with a driver CD/diskette)
    • Remove any junk files accumulated on your PC ( C Previous Posts )
    • Look up whether any application you've installed is trying to access the internet by itself (iTunes, Windows Update, Zone Alarm, etc)



    In addition,

    • Pop-ups and ads of any sort will eat up your bandwidth
    • Sometimes flashing your modem's firmware helps boost speed (beware: this is risky business, and often causes far more problems than it's worth ever worth trying. Consult your modem company's website, and if you can't find anything there, try googling )
    • There are services available that will boost dial-up speeds to near-broadband capacities (3-7 times faster from your usual speed) for a monthly or annual fee. Check it out if it is available in your area.
    If you make yourself more than just a man, if you devote yourself to an ideal, then, you become something else entirely.
    Are you ready to begin?

  4. #94
    SB Legend Major General hotspicyhot's Avatar
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    Arrow Miscellaneous security software (Part 1)

    Miscellaneous Security Software (Part 1)

    The following aren't really reviews, but should provide you with everything you need to know.

    Anti-spyware and Anti-adware :

    Most antivirus applications today come with built-in anti-spywares, so unless you're suspicious something is wrong with your PC you don't need to worry. However, it would be a good idea to install a third-party anti-spyware and anti-adware once in a while to make sure everything's under control. The chief anti-spyware and anti-adware brands are Windows Defender (from Microsoft), Ad-Aware 2007 Free (Lavasoft), AVG Anti-Spyware Free Edition (Grisoft) and Spybot S&D (Safer Networking). Note that I haven't mentioned any paid software, such as the popular Spy Sweeper (Webroot Software). It hardly makes any sense to spend money on something your antivirus is already partially taking care of (the free antiviruses are lagging in this department).

    So which one should you use? No single program can detect all spyware/adware, so one isn't enough. What I do is I spring clean my computer once a month or so -- I install at least two anti-spyware/adware programs and do a thorough check (I like Ad-Aware and Spybot, although Windows Defender is, surprisingly, pretty good; AVG has failed to impress, especially in the definition updates department). Once I'm done I uninstall them -- and that takes us to the issue of registry cleaners.

    Registry Cleaner/Fixer :


    Whatever you call them, if you own a Windows you should have at least one, if not two. There are loads of registry cleaners out there, and buying one (or two) isn't probably a bad idea; like anti-spyware/adware, no two registry cleaners scan for the same items. Eusing Free Registry Cleaner (v1.6), Abexo Free Registry Cleaner (v1) and the little-mentioned RegSeeker (v1.51) are (you guessed) three of the best free ones out there; I also liked TweakNow RegCleaner Standard (v3.0.1). On the shareware front, Registry Mechanic (v7.0; is probably the biggest name out there. My favourite, however, is RegVac (v5.01; don't be deceived by the sloppy looks) -- it did a superb job cleaning up my registry. Expert users might fall in love with jv16 PowerTools (v2007; v2008 coming up soon) -- a fantastic, fantastic piece of software.

    By the way, I feel Registry Mechanic is highly overrated (and aggressively marketed by PC Tools), and so is Ashampoo WinOptimizer (v4.41). You can't really forgive a registry cleaner if it cleans only a select number of errors in the trial version, or if the company keeps emailing you about the latest offers till kingdom come. Plus, none of these could really match the performance of RegVac or jv16 either.

    I use RegVac alongside RegSeeker, and I'm happy with them. I also fiddle with Abexo at times. The golden rule of registry cleaning: if it's not broke, don't fix it. In other words stay happy if your current registry cleaner does the job well for you. If you're looking for a registry cleaner, make sure it has a backup/restore feature. Your registry isn't something you'd want to mess around with. If you're not really familiar with your Windows' registry, always go with the default settings of your cleaner. Every registry cleaner will also optimize/defrag the registry, which really boosts computer performance; and these days they also include tools to fine-tune or clean up your PC (cache cleaner, etc).


    Junk file cleaner :


    I don't really know what else to call them, but 'privacy software' would probably be more appropriate. The stuff they do is clean up all the accumulated junk files on your computer, and hence they're indispensable. Since CCleaner (latest: v2.40.543) debuted, there aren't really many candidates to pick from in this category. CCleaner is free and cleans up your computer really well; in addition, it also cleans up your registry a bit.

    The one I use is paid software: Tracks Eraser Pro (latest is v7.0; I have a much older version) has an intuitive interface and cleans up your PC fast. Plus, it has some additional features, such as stealth mode, the ability to shred recycle bin files (a must if you deal with sensitive information) and a boss key. My bet: go with Tracks Eraser, or combine CCleaner with Eraser (v5.7; completely shreds sensitive files), to make sure your PC is clean of trash.

    Monitor changes to your computer :

    One of my favourite software is WinPatrol from BillP Studios. It's free, but there's a paid version as well. What it basically does is it monitors any changes to your system upon a software installation. In other words, you get to choose what an installed software gets to do on your computer. This is a really, really useful tool that goes a long way in keeping your PC healthy. Other software, such as some antiviruses and some firewalls, often perform this function, but never as well as WinPatrol does. I've never seen it giving false alarms, and it doesn't consume much RAM either. A must have.
    If you make yourself more than just a man, if you devote yourself to an ideal, then, you become something else entirely.
    Are you ready to begin?

  5. #95
    SB Legend Major General hotspicyhot's Avatar
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    Arrow Miscellaneous security software (Part 2)

    Miscellaneous Security Software (Part 2)

    Firewall :

    I'll try to keep this one short. I had a real hard time choosing my firewall, and had to try all the available options (I've never used one I had to pay for). The reasons for having a firewall is obvious: the one that comes built-in with Windows isn't competent, and according to a study, someone tries to hack your computer within 7 seconds of online time (I can't remember the sources, but it was possibly a UK security firm that conducted the research). I've used Comodo, Kerio and ZoneAlarm; I've also used the firewalls that come as part of the security suites every antivirus company has to offer (except NOD32 and BitDefender).

    Among the latter category, Kaspersky's firewall is perhaps best, although my conclusion is you do need a third-party firewall. In that case, you don't really need an antivirus security suite, just the antivirus would do. This narrows down my picks to Comodo, Kerio and ZoneAlarm.

    Comodo Firewall Pro (v3.0) is, despite the misleading title, free. And it's a pretty good firewall. Comodo is great for advanced users, but should be okay with normal joes too. There's an new intrusion detection system that should detect unknown threats, but unfortunately I couldn't figure out how to test this feature. It's not too heavy on RAM and crashed on one occasion.

    ZoneAlarm is a longtime champ, but isn't dominating the firewall market as it used to (with all the new firewalls popping up). ZoneAlarm (v7.0.362) has a new 'game mode' (that makes sure you aren't bothered with alerts when you're busy playing video games on your PC). The interface needs a facelift; I'm tired of seeing the almost-same thing for years. It's also getting RAM intensive day by day. However, ZoneAlarm is still incredibly user-friendly.

    Sunbelt Kerio Personal Firewall (v4.40) is pretty famous these days, mostly due to its configuration options. It's easy on system resources, but gave me nightmares: Kerio crashed far too often and seemed to ask far too many questions. Need I say more?

    Symantec has recently acquired Sygate Personal Firewall, so now it's part of Norton Internet Security 2007. I've used Sygate before and found it a strong contender to ZoneAlarm. But Sygate had configuration hassles, now that it's part of the Symantec camp I'm probably never going to use it again. My experience: anything from Norton is a no-no . Resource Hungry .

    Okay, so which firewall do you go for? If you've never used anything else from the one in Windows, I suggest you try out Comodo and ZoneAlarm. Stick to the one that you feel most comfortable with, for firewalls, like registry cleaners, are long-term investments. I personally prefer ZoneAlarm because: 1. it's incredibly simple; 2. I've got used to it; 3. it doesn't bother you with too many prompts.

    Your call.

    Updating Windows


    Let's face it: Windows' update mechanism isn't perfect, and the auto-update feature has often caused annoyances. Frustrated, for a long time I had (foolishly) decided to not be bothered with the latest Windows updates altogether -- heck, why did I have to be care when I had a rock-steady firewall, antivirus and all other security software necessary installed? I subsequently discovered that I couldn't, for example, access my Wi-Fi network from my laptop without updating Windows. But I still didn't want to turn automatic updates on, and ultimately found salvation in Autopatcher XP.

    I now have some bad news. Microsoft has very recently engaged in a tussle with Autopatcher, and the end result is Autopatcher is history. Still, if you haven't updated your XP in a long while, and want a top-notch updating experience (that you can customize too), hunt for the latest version you can find online. It's made lots of folks happy (myself included, Microsoft excluded ) and you're just unlucky you reached the bandwagon when it stopped moving.

    Conclusion

    If you've picked your arsenal from the categories mentioned in this post and have an antivirus installed , your PC should be a fortress. Software junkies have a very hard time restraining themselves from checking out new software, but when it comes to security, it's best to stick to the options that are working for you. So how does this all contribute to optimizing your broadband|Windows|Firefox experience? Well, if your PC is secure and running smoothly, there's a much better chance that your online experience won't suffer from problems stemming from your home front (i.e. from within your computer). And you have that feeling of digital invincibility. God mode!

    Next: SOON !
    If you make yourself more than just a man, if you devote yourself to an ideal, then, you become something else entirely.
    Are you ready to begin?

  6. #96
    SB Legend Brigadier General VrOoM's Avatar
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    thanks for sharing repped........

  7. #97
    SB Legend Major General hotspicyhot's Avatar
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    Arrow

    Quote Originally Posted by faisal4pro View Post
    Going g8 brother......!
    Quote Originally Posted by chand_ki_chandni View Post
    I know one codec for all in one purpose! The Storm Codec....
    Thanks 4 the information!
    Quote Originally Posted by mamu.ji View Post
    was searching for this...
    a well compiled info...
    thanks for sharing along with pictures....
    subscribed & repped also....
    Quote Originally Posted by faisal4pro View Post
    tfs the upzz....!!!!
    Quote Originally Posted by krish.mukh View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by VrOoM_GuY View Post
    hmm great one...tfs...repped
    Quote Originally Posted by VrOoM_GuY View Post
    thanks for sharing repped........
    If you make yourself more than just a man, if you devote yourself to an ideal, then, you become something else entirely.
    Are you ready to begin?

  8. #98
    SB Legend Major General hotspicyhot's Avatar
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    Arrow Say Good-Bye (Really) to Disconnect Dialogs

    Say Good-Bye to Disconnect Dialogs

    Every time I close Internet Explorer, a box pops up asking me if I want to close my connection to the Internet. How can I stop this box from appearing every time I close IE?


    This feature makes sense if you want to minimize your time online because your ISP's number is a toll call, the ISP charges you by the minute, or you don't want to miss incoming calls--among other reasons. But most of the time, it's just an annoyance. To banish the box, choose Tools, Internet Options, click the Connections tab, and select your dial-up account from the "Dial-up settings" list. Then click the Settings button and the Advanced button under "Dial-up settings." (Hold on, we're almost there. ) Now uncheck "Disconnect when connection may no longer be needed," and finally click OK three times to save the change. The next time you're done browsing, there'll be one less box to click .
    If you make yourself more than just a man, if you devote yourself to an ideal, then, you become something else entirely.
    Are you ready to begin?

  9. #99
    ℂ℟ỉɱỉℕλL Colonel mamu.zi's Avatar
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    Good work dude....... Repz added..... Keep posting.....

  10. #100
    SB Legend Major General hotspicyhot's Avatar
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    Arrow Increase Monitor Refresh Rate: Reduce Flicker, Eye Strain and Headaches

    Increase Monitor Refresh Rate: Reduce Flicker, Eye Strain and Headaches

    Ever have headaches after staring at your screen?

    Maybe your computers monitors screens refresh rate is too low and your screen flickers. Many users are used to the flicker, or your eyes are not sensitive enough to detect it, but the flicker is there. And till it flickers, it will irritate your eyes and cause eye strain. Higher refresh rates are less likely to cause eyestrain.

    Increase Monitor Refresh Rate

    What is the refresh rate?
    The refresh rate (or frequency) refers to the number of times per second that the video board redraws the entire screen.

    How to change the refresh rate
    In Windows XP

    • Go to Control Panel>Display
    • In Settings> Advanced>Monitor
    • Always Check the box for ‘Hide modes that this monitor cannot display’ to avoid hardware disputes. This will then give a drop down list of refresh rates that your monitor safely supports and you may set it up without error. You may also check your manufacturer’s documentation for information about the settings that your monitor supports.
    • And then increase the monitors refresh rate. Most users agree it should be 75 Hz or more for optimal results. My computer was set to 60 Hz, the minimum by default.


    Note:
    If you specify a refresh rate that is too high for your monitor, your screen may become unusable and your hardware may be damaged. Also note, Some monitors shiver at higher rates and some of the higher resolutions and color depths may be unavailable at the higher frequencies.

    My computer displayed resolutions from 60Hz to 200Hz. When I clicked the ‘Hide modes that this monitor cannot display’ box, the choices were only few from 60-80Hz. So I was glad I did not mess up by selecting a higher value which my CRT monitor did not support. I decided to select the recommended 75Hz. Increasing the refresh rate setting to 75 Hz has made a marked improvement and got rid of the headaches.


    Reduce Computer Monitor Eye Strain in 2 Easy Steps


    In fact I have applied these 2 simple fixes on several computers and they have reported a definite reduction of computer vision syndrome and eye strain. You may also try these 2 simple fixes.

    Turn on ClearType in Microsoft Windows XP - ClearType delivers improved font display quality over traditional forms of font smoothing or anti-aliasing. It improves readability on color LCD displays with a digital interface, such as those in laptops and high-quality flat panel displays. Readability on CRT monitors can also be improved. You see better and see clearer with reduced eyestrain.

    Increase your Monitor Refresh Rate - The basic thing is that monitors flicker. Many users are used to the computer monitor flicker, or your eyes are not sensitive enough to detect it, but the flicker is there. And till it flickers, it will irritate your eyes and cause eye strain. Higher refresh rates are less likely to cause eyestrain. See what is the optimal refresh rate for your monitor and reduce flicker induced eyestrain and headache.

    Ever since I have optimized my refresh rate and switched to ClearType, I can assure you would want to do the same! .
    If you make yourself more than just a man, if you devote yourself to an ideal, then, you become something else entirely.
    Are you ready to begin?

  11. #101
    SB Legend Major General hotspicyhot's Avatar
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    Arrow What is Clock Speed?

    What is Clock Speed?

    Clock speed is a measure of how quickly a computer completes basic computations and operations. It is measured as a frequency in hertz, and most commonly refers to the speed of the computer's CPU, or Central Processing Unit. Since the frequency most clock speed measures is very high, the terms megahertz and gigahertz are used. A megahertz is one-million cycles per second, while a gigahertz is one-billion cycles per second. So a computer with a clock speed of 800MHz is running 800,000,000 cycles per second, while a 2.4GHz computer is running 2,400,000,000 cycles per second.

    How clock speed should be used as a benchmark of a computer's speed is a matter of some contention, though most chip makers appear to be drifting towards the conclusion that clock speed should be abandoned as the primary value given. The problem comes from the fact that, although clock speed works as a fairly reliable indicator of how one of a company's chips stacks up against another of their chips, it is a poor indicator of how that chip might compete against a different company's chipset. One reason clock speed of the CPU isn't such a reliable test of overall computer speed is that many other factors come into play. The amount of RAM a computer has, the clock speed of that RAM, the clock speed of the front-side bus, and the cache size all play significant roles in determining overall performance.

    When comparing one Intel Pentium chip to another Pentium chip, for example, the clock speed is a fairly good indicator of an improvement in speed. An 800Mhz Pentium computer will perform most processor-based tasks roughly twice as quickly as a 400MHz Pentium computer. When comparing a different company's processors, however, the story changes. If we look at both a Pentium chip and an AMD chip, for example, we find that the AMD tends to perform most tasks more quickly than a comparable Pentium. A 1.8GHz AMD chip significantly outperforms a Pentium 1.8Ghz chip, instead performing near the speed of a Pentium 2.2Ghz.

    For this reason, AMD stopped listing their clock speed as a primary method of advertising on their computers, instead associating a number with the computer meant to show its performance in comparison to a Pentium. The AMD Athlon 64 3000, for example, has a clock speed of only 1.8GHz, but AMD determined it to be roughly comparable to a Pentium 4 at 3GHz. Intel itself has also begun to move away from the clock speed model of advertising, mostly due to their introduction of a laptop-oriented M line, which has much lower clock speeds to optimize portable performance. By sticking to a clock speed model, Intel made its Pentium-M computers look like they were slow and weak compared to their Pentium 4 models.

    While clock speed can still give a general idea of computing power, it is more often recommended these days to look at some sort of trusted benchmark as a way to compare computers. Looking at benchmarks of how various processors handled tasks you care about will give a clearer picture of how the computer will perform for you. One computer might be significantly faster than another at transforming images in a graphic design program, for example, but slower at video-intensive games. This paradigm of more task-specific computer ratings, rather than a focus exclusively on clock speed, ultimately offers consumers a better understanding of what sort of product they can expect.
    If you make yourself more than just a man, if you devote yourself to an ideal, then, you become something else entirely.
    Are you ready to begin?

  12. #102
    ●๋•нαя ∂нα∂кαη υѕкє ℓιソє● Field Marshal kaps58's Avatar
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    wat if ...wen i hide any folder ..it remain hidden , how can i recover it..and wat might be the possible reason for that....is that a virus..????????
    God is Really Creative....I Mean... Just Luk @ Me ...!!!

  13. #103
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    WOW so much to read and remember!!!
    Thank u so much!!!

  14. #104
    SB Legend Major General hotspicyhot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaps58 View Post
    wat if ...wen i hide any folder ..it remain hidden , how can i recover it..and wat might be the possible reason for that....is that a virus..????????
    GOTO MY COMPUTER
    CLICK TOOLS > FOLDER OPTIONS
    ON THE VIEW TAB
    CHECK THE RADIO BUTTON SHOW HIDDEN FILES AND FOLDERS
    [ SCREENSHOT FOR EASY UNDERSTANDING ]



    NOW CHECK THAT HIDDEN FOLDER. I HOPE IT NOW VISIBLE .
    IF THIS DINT SOLVE YOUR PROBLEM I AM REDIRECTING YOU TO OUR
    CHIEF DOCTOR THREAD PC CLINIC

    HSH
    If you make yourself more than just a man, if you devote yourself to an ideal, then, you become something else entirely.
    Are you ready to begin?

  15. #105
    SB Legend Major General hotspicyhot's Avatar
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    Arrow Great Freeware for Who working on Low RAM Memory

    Free RAM Optimizer XP
    Free RAM Optimizer XP is a small utility that runs in the system tray and monitors your memory usage. If the available memory drops below a certain level, it will automatically attempt to free a specified amount of RAM, making it available to other applications. The tray icon indicates your current memory usage and you can also perform manual free-ups in 6mb increments.
    Last edited by hotspicyhot; 03-07-2008 at 08:18 PM.

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