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Companies that collaborated with Nazis

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  • Companies that collaborated with Nazis

    During Adolf Hitler’s time, being able to do business in Germany almost meant supporting the dictator. So it's not at all fair to frame all these businesses as enthusiastic Nazi collaborators. While some of these businesses exist and flourish today, it's likely that millions of their customers have no idea of these companies' past dealings with the Nazi party.
    Thank you bala

  • #2
    For a brief period in the late 1930s and 1940s, Adolf Hitler managed to redefine and personify evil in a way that even ancient mass-murderers such as Tamerlane and Genghis Khan never aspired to. By virtue of Hitler taking complete control of the most powerful country on the European continent, practically every existing business entity in Germany thus became a de facto instrument of this new and tyrannical government. At that time, doing business in Germany meant supporting Hitler, so it's not fair to frame all these businesses as enthusiastic Nazi collaborators. While some of these businesses exist and flourish today, it's likely that millions of their customers have no idea of these companies' past dealings with the Nazi party.


    Thank you bala

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    • #3
      Bayer
      It seems that almost any German multinational of a certain vintage can find a link to the Nazi regime. In some cases, that link is more direct than in others. Bayer was founded in Germany in 1863, and has been a household name in North America since not long after. Today, despite making everything from polymers to blood glucose monitors, Bayer remains most famous for being the company that first discovered (or more accurately, isolated) aspirin.
      The most outrageous thing about Bayer's connection to the Nazi regime is the timing. In 1956, Bayer welcomed a new chairman of the board: a second-generation chemist named Fritz ter Meer. Bayer's directors must have liked what they saw in Fritz ter Meer, whose resume included the study of law, employment with his father's company and three years in prison for war crimes.


      Thank you bala

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      • #4
        It's not as if ter Meer had been punished for, say, being ordered against his will to stand guard at Dachau. No, he helped plan Monowitz, a concentration camp better known as Auschwitz III. He also built the infamous Buna factory, where his colleagues conducted human experiments and forced slaves to build critical components for the Wehrmacht. Furthermore, Fritz ter Meer never denied his involvement, and he was sentenced to seven years in prison during the infamous Nuremburg Trials.
        However, ter Meer served less than half of his sentence. Even then, having been subjected to a wrist slap from a light and fluffy pillow, ter Meer didn't merely fall into obscurity. He not only held the highest executive position at Bayer, but also served on the boards of several other companies before retiring in the 1960s and dying of natural causes at the age of 83

        Thank you bala

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        • #5
          IG Farben
          For some of us of a certain age, BASF was the company that made cassette tapes. Another German multinational that's been around since the 19th century, BASF is similar to Siemens in another way, in that it produces the unglamorous if vital things that make life better: engineering plastics, chemical coatings and polymers that their end users don't even notice.
          In 1925, BASF and a couple of partners formed an infamous conglomerate named IG Farben. One of the chemicals manufactured by the company at the time was Zyklon B, which was the gas used to suffocate untold millions of concentration camp prisoners during the Holocaust.
          In 1951, when the victors partitioned Germany, the Western Allies restored IG Farben into its original components. Today, BASF continues to trade as one of the featured securities on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange, with a market capitalization of over $60 billion.



          Thank you bala

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          • #6
            Siemens
            Next time you're in your garage, look at the brand names of the products you find. If you own a damping pin, turbo compressor or fluoroscope, there's a good chance it carries the Siemens logo. The company is worth approximately $89 billion, employs roughly 370,000 people and claims to operate in about 190 countries.
            When World War II became the major topic of concern for Germany, Siemens was there. The company forced slaves to manufacture components for the rockets that ended up raining down on London and Antwerp, Belgium in short order. In the early 21st century, Siemens began to pay reparations to the workers it had paid nary a pfennig to 55 years earlier.


            Thank you bala

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            • #7




              The Bottom Line

              In a world where Chick-Fil-A can face a boycott because of the religious views of its chairman, and British Petroleum can be the subject of virulent protests because of a tragic accident, it's tough to imagine what form of consumer activism would be appropriate if the companies featured on this list were doing business today with hated regimes.

              .........
              Thank you bala

              Comment


              • #8
                Shaam-e-Avadh is very tiring

                Comment


                • #9
                  basanti,

                  thanks for sharing and post more

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    i read about Ikea somewhere


                    Make My Day

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ignoramusenator View Post
                      i read about Ikea somewhere

                      U sure Iggy ???
                      "I'm always ready to learn although I do not always like being taught"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        my goodness........unbelievable!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          that's why bayer is good in making mosquito killer

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by gracefulguy View Post
                            U sure Iggy ???
                            I read it somewhere, here is Telegraph article.

                            IKEA's billionaire founder Ingvar Kamprad was a member of the Swedish Nazi party and was such a concern to secret service they opened a file on him, according to a new book.

                            The 1943 file, revealed in a book published on Wednesday by Swedishjournalist Elisabeth Åsbrink, will revive the long-standing controversy over the far right sympathies of the 85-year-old businessman.

                            It proves for the first time that Mr Kamprad was an active member of Svensk Socialistisk Samling – the successor to the Swedish Nationalist Socialist Workers Party – even detailing his membership number, 4013.

                            It quotes letters intercepted from Mr Kamprad, then 17, in which he enthuses about recruiting new members and says that he "misses no opportunity to work for the movement".

                            The secret service concluded that, as Mr Kamprad received the party's youth newspaper, he must have held "some sort of official position within the organisation".

                            Ms Åsbrink accused Mr Kamprad of failing to come clean about the full extent of his Nazi past.
                            Wiki

                            As a teenager, IKEA founder Ingvar Kamprad was directly involved in the pro-Nazi New Swedish Movement (Nysvenska Rörelsen) until at least 1948, causing tensions when IKEA began opening stores in Israel, although one source has claimed that the movement was not pro-Nazi.Kamprad devotes two chapters to his time in Nysvenska Rörelsen in his book, Leading By Design: The IKEA Story and, in a 1994 letter to IKEA employees, called his affiliation with the organisation the "greatest mistake of my life." After the revelations came to light, he pledged £1 billion to charity.


                            Make My Day

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                            • #15
                              good addition iggum.......
                              Thank you bala

                              Comment

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